A very narrow escape

There was news of the fate of several men from Burghfield.

THE WAR

Honours and Promotions

Temporary Captain G H B Chance, MGC, to be Assistant Instructor, graded for pay at Hythe rate.

Casualties

Captain R P Bullivant, MC (1st County of London Yeomanry), killed in action, in Palestine; 2nd Lt A Searies (Suffolk Regiment), severely wounded; Albert Bond (13th Royal Fusiliers), wounded last April; L Clarke (2/4th Royal Berks), wounded; Eric G Lamperd (London Regiment), prisoner; F J Maunder (Devon Regiment), wounded; Lance Corporal Percy Watts (Royal Berks Regiment), wounded; Lance Corporal Alfred West (Inniskilling Fusiliers), prisoner.

No details have yet been received about the lamented death of Captain Ritchie Bullivant, of which the whole parish will have heard with regret. It is hoped to give some fuller notice in a future magazine. Meanwhile his brother may be assured of general sympathy.

It is to be deplored that gallant Alfred Searies should have been seriously wounded, gunshot wounds in face and hand. He has, however, been able to be removed to hospital at Wimereux, so his mother may hope for the best. He had been doing duty for some time as acting captain; and we hear that he had also been recommended for the Military Cross, so he had been distinguishing himself before receiving his third wound.

2nd Lt G D Lake, ASC, MT, has lately had a very narrow escape from a shell bursting close to him and killing and injuring several men. We hope to see him safe and sound home for his approaching marriage, which is to take place (if he gets his expected “leave”) about mid-November.

Burghfield parish magazine, November 1918 (D/EX725/4)

Advertisements

“We all long for peace, but it must be peace after victory, and the enemy must be thoroughly beaten first”

Even as more men were reported killed, some were determined that no easy quarter should be given to the enemy.

“Sir Albert Stanley, President of the Board of Trade, has sent a letter to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Cardinal Bourne, the Chief Rabbi, the Salvation Army, and the heads of Churches of all other Denominations in England and Scotland and Wales, calling attention to the serous scarcity of coal, and suggesting that Church Services should be held in daylight.”

The Times, October 17th.

If this should be enforced, we hope our congregation will loyally fall in with such an arrangement.

THE WAR

Our brave troops, along with those of our Allies, have been winning victory after victory for the last three months, and the enemy has made proposals for an armistice to the President of the United States. We all long for peace, but it must be peace after victory, and the enemy must be thoroughly beaten first. We can safely trust to our Rulers, and to our Admirals and Generals, with those of our Allies, to see that no premature peace is entered upon. Now they need all our prayers, that they may be guided to right decisions. We are deeply thankful for God’s recent mercies to us, and we pray that we may be worthy of them. What a glorious day it will be when the war really ends, and our men return home again!

Mrs Doggett has lost her husband, Sidney Newman Doggett, from illness in France, and we offer her our sincere sympathy in her trouble. Like so many others, he has nobly given his life for his country.

ROLL OF HONOUR

91 Albert Edward Marshall, 2nd Batt. Wilts Regt, died of wounds at Haesnes April 12th, 1918. RIP.
92 John William Charles Gough, 5th Batt. West Riding Regt, killed in action July 20th, 1918. RIP.
93 L-Corp. Frederick John Lake, 1st Dorset Regt, killed in action July 20th, 1918. RIP.
94 Pte Jesse A Buxey, 1st Royal Warwicks, killed in action in France August 30th, 1918. RIP.
95 Pte Sidney Newman Doggett, Roayl Warwickshire Regt, died in France September 28th, 1918. RIP.
96 Gunner Philip John Webb, RGA, died of wounds August 15th, 1918. RIP.

Newbury St Nicolas parish magazine, November 1918 (D/P89/28A/13)

Laid to rest: the Newbury roll of honour

The Newbury men who had been killed were listed in the church magazine by installment.

ROLL OF HONOUR

Copied and supplied to the Parish Magazine by Mr J W H Kemp

(Continued from last month.)

45. Pte Benjamin Weller Smith, Duke of Cornwall’s LI, killed in France, June 18th, aged 24. Laid to rest at Bus, France.

46. Corp. Harry Lawes, killed in Mesopotamia 21st January, 1914.

47. Pte Ernest Westall, Territorials, died 16th June, 1916, in hospital.

48. Pte William Oscar Wickens, 8th Batt. Royal Berks Regt, missing since Oct. 13th, 1915, now reported killed.

49. Pte Bertram Edgar Wickens, Inter-communication Section 1/4 Royal Berks Regt, died of wounds April 17th, 1917.

50. Pte Gerald Lionel Wickens, 1/1 Trench Mortar Battery, 1st Infantry Brigade, killed in action August 27th, 1916.

51. Pte James Reginald Swatton, killed November, 1916. RIP.

52. Basil Henry Belcher, Royal Berks Regt, missing, believed killed, July 1st, 1916.

53. Pte Charles Whitehorn, killed in action July 3rd, 1916, 5th Royal Berks Regt.

54. Alan George Busby, killed in France June 9th, 1917. RIP.

55. In memory of Thomas Alfred Stillman, 2nd son of Mrs Stillman, of Market Street, Newbury, killed in action June 6th somewhere in France.

56. In memory of George Frederick Stevens, Qr-Master-Sergt, Royal Engineers, killed in France, July 10-11, 1917.

57. Sergt Frederick John Preston, 2/4 Royal Berks Regt, died of wounds, Le Trefont Hospital, France, 7th June, 1917.

58. L-Corp. William Crook, 94142, 128th Field Co, RE, killed July 1st, 1917, late of Diamond Cottages, Newbury.

59. Sergt W H Lake, 633 battery RFA, Indian Expeditionary Forces, died August 10th, 1916; prisoner of war in Turkey.

60. Pte Frank Pibworth, 6th Batt. Royal Berks Regt, died of wounds August 1st, 1917.

61. Pte Charles Mundy, KOYLI, killed Sept. 14th, 1917.

62. Pte Alfred John Aldridge, 16th Royal Warwickshire Regt, killed in action in France July 27th, 1916.

63. Pte Albert James Geater, A Co 1/4 Royal Berks Regt, killed in action August 16th, 1917.

64. Signalman Arthur William Stevens, 1st Devons, died of wounds in Hospital, France, October 4th, 1917.

65. Pte George Herbert Smith, 6th Batt. Royal Berks, killed in France March 10th 1915.

66. Pte James Henry Smith, 6th Batt. Royal Berks, killed in France August 27th, 1915.

67. Pte Edward Albert Smith, 6th Batt. Royal Berks, killed in action August 16th, 1917.

(To be continued.)

Newbury St Nicholas parish magazine, April 1918 (D/P89/28A/13)

The clear, brave notes of the “Last Post” are heard again

There was news of a number of men from Burghfield.

THE WAR

Honours and Promotions

Captain Richard P Bullivant of the Mill House (County of London Yemanry) has been awarded the Military Cross for good service in Palestine, particularly in connection with the charge of dismounted Yeomanry near Jerusalem.

Mr George D Lake of Brookfield has received his commission as 2nd Lieutenant after OTC training, and is to join his unit (ASC, MT) in France on 1st March.

Ernest Wise (2/4th Royal Berks) has been made Provost-Sergeant of the Battalion.

Casualties

B Hutchins (2/4th Royal Berks), wounded, a second time.

Discharge

A C Lovelock (ASC, MT), ill health, Feb 1918.

Obituary Notice

Lance-Corporal R T Montagu (see last month’s magazine). Mr Montagu has received a letter from the captain of his son’s Company containing the words –

“Your son was in my platoon before I took over the command of the Company, and I gave him his lance stripe. He was a thoroughly good fellow, and a really fine soldier. The Company has lost a good man, and he will be greatly missed.”

He appears to have been killed by a shell while out on patrol early on the morning of the 8th January.

The death of Ernest Goddard is recorded with regret. He died at home on 12th February. He was called up from Reserve at outbreak of war, and posted to the 1st Royal Berks. Wounded in October 1915, he lost his right arm, and was discharged in June 1916. We all sympathize with his father and the family. The Depot of the Regiment sent a bearer party with a corporal and a bugler to his funeral on the 16th February; and the clear, brave notes of the “Last Post” were heard again in our quiet churchyard.

Burghfield parish magazine, March 1918 (D/EX725/4)

No liability for personal injury as the result of an enemy air raid

Who should pay for air raid losses? One men spirited employer refused to pay out under their workmen’s compensation policy for an employees killed in an air raid on his place of work.

17 November 1917

The Chairman reported that he had agreed to extend the time for the payment of £3 lent to Mrs Lake for an additional month from 27 November 1917. The action of the Chairman was approved, and the Committee decided that Mrs Lake be allowed a further two months extension to 27 January 1918.

The Chairman read the correspondence between the Treasurer, Mrs Coleman and the Government Committee, with reference to the fatal accident to Mrs Coleman’s husband in the air raid on June 13, 1917.

The Chairman stated that following the authority of the Government Committee he had authorised a payment of 12/6 per week to Mrs Coleman pending the settlement of her claim for compensation against her late husband’s employers under the Workman’s Compensation Act.

The following letter from Messrs Griffiths & Gardner was read:

Coleman deceased

Our clients Messrs R Barrett & Son Ltd in whose employ Mrs Coleman’s husband was at the time of his death owing to an enemy bomb exploding, have handed us your letter to her of the 6th instant and requested us to reply thereto.

We have advised our clients that there is no liability under the Workmen’s Compensation Act for personal injury as the result of an enemy raid. The deceased’s death did not result from personal injury by accident arising out of and in the course of his employment, but purely owing to the raid.

We ourselves ran the same risk in our offices, as the deceased did at Messrs Barretts.

Yours faithfully
Griffith & Gardner

The Treasurer was authorised to send a copy of the above letter to the Government Committee for their observations.

The Chairman read correspondence between the Treasurer, Mr Bowyer, Miss Smith and the Government Committee, from which it appeared that Mr W F Bowyer and Miss G I Smith claimed amounts of £3.4.3 and £1.0.1 respectively, for clothing destroyed in the air raid of July 7, 1917.

The Committee decided to recommend the claims to be paid.


National Relief Fund: Berkshire Committee minutes (C/CL/C6/4/1)

Ploughing the land

The local committee of the National Relief Fund, which aimed to help people thrown into poverty as a direct result of the war, decided to help out a mother trying to keep her son’s farm going.

21 April 1917
Application for Loan

The following letter from Mr W H Tottie was read:

Mrs Lake, Yew Tree Farm, Swallowfield
This woman has with her husband been looking after a farm for their son who is in the Berkshire Yeomanry. As her husband died recently and she has since then been quite unable to find or pay for labour she now wants assistance towards ploughing the land. A neighbouring farmer will do this for her and he asks £5, but Lady Constance Pasley thinks it could be done for less – say £3 – the Pensions Committee and the War Agricultural Committee have no powers to grant this and I would suggest that our National Relief Fund should help her. It is obviously desirable that the land be tilled. Mr Norland and the War Agricultural Committee have particulars.

Yours sincerely
(Signed) W H Tottie

The Committee decided that Mrs Lake be granted a loan of not exceeding £5, such loan to be repayable six months after the issue of the cheque and to be secured by a promissory note signed by Mrs Lake.

National Relief Fund: Berkshire Committee minutes (C/CL/C6/4/1)

“We shall never forget the English people”

The Laurent family from Belgian had been guests of the people of Burghfield for almost a year. Now they were moving on:

OUR BELGIAN FRIENDS AT THE OLD SCHOOLS

In the Magazine of November 1914 will be found an account of the arrival on 24th October of M and Mme Laurent, of 5 Rue de Diest, Louvain, and their two daughters, and last July they were joined by their young son (aged 16) who has been working in Wales. After almost exactly a year, they have now left us on 19th October, Mme Laurent being in very poor health and unable (in the opinion of Dr Lake of Brookfield, who has been very kind to her) to bear another winter in the Old Schools.

They have passed now under the care of the Mayor of Reading’s Belgian Relief Committee, who have found accommodation for them at 102 London Road, where we hope they will be comfortable until the happy times of peace, and return to their own land.

All of us who have know them are sorry to lose them, and it is pleasant to know that our warm feelings are reciprocated, as may be gathered from the following rather free translation of a farewell letter written on their departure:

The Old Schools
19/10/1915

To the Committee of Burghfield

We, the Laurent family, wish to let readers (of the Magazine) know how much gratitude we feel is due from us to the Committee of Burghfield. It is a whole year since we took refuge in the parish, and from our arrival here down to the day of our departure, we cannot say how generous they have been to us. And at the last we cannot help expressing to all the members of the Committee our best thanks. And we shall never forget the English people, and we hope our compatriots will do the same.

La Famille Laurent, qui doit tant de reconnaissance au Comite de Burghfield.

Alphonse Laurent
Florence (nee Cazier) Laurent
Reine Laurent
Jeanne Eleanore Laurent
Arthur Laurent

Burghfield parish magazine, November 1915 (D/EX725/3)

Cutting down on cookery and handicraft lessons

Berkshire schools continued to be affected by the war, as the reports of the Education Committee’s sub-committees reveal.

Higher Education Sub-committee
BELGIAN CHILDREN
The Sub-committee have approved the admission of certain Belgian children into the County Secondary Schools without payment of fees. The Board of Education have informed the Government that these children need not be calculated in determining the number of free places to be awarded under S.20 of the Regulations.

School Management Sub-committee
TEACHERS ON MILITARY SERVICE
There are now 38 teachers from the Elementary Schools of the county on military service. The Sub-committee have learned with regret that Mr Berry, Assistant Master at Sunningdale School, has been killed in action…

SPECIAL SUBJECTS INSTRUCTION
Owing to the use of three of the Cookery and Handicraft Centres for hospital purposes, the Sub-committee have found it necessary to effect some re-arrangement of the work. As a result, they propose to terminate the engagement of one of the Cookery Teachers and do not propose to fill temporarily the post of one of the Handicraft Instructors who has joined HM Forces.

By-Laws and Attendance Sub-committee
SCHOOL MEDICAL SERVICE
Both of the Assistant School Medical Inspectors (G H Culverwell and L E Napier) have applied for and been granted leave of absence to join the RAMC for the period of the war.

The Sub-committee have authorised the Acting School Medical Officer [Dr Sisam] to engage temporary assistance for the examination of special cases and G R Lake, MRCS (Eng), LSA, of Burghfield, is being employed about two half-days per week.

Nurse Dwyer has applied for and been granted leave of absence, without salary, to take up military hospital work.

LABOUR CERTIFICATE EXAMINATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS
Since August 1914, 394 boys of 13 years of age have been granted Exemption Certificate under the By-laws for employment on farms; and in addition the Sub-committee have excused temporarily from attendance at school 154 boys over 12 years of age for agricultural employment owing to shortage of labour.

Reports of sub-committees to Berkshire Education Committee, 10 July 1915 (C/CL/C1/1/18)

Further funds needed for our Belgian guests in Burghfield

By February 1915 more money was needed to support the Belgian refugees who had found a home in Burghfield, and the parish magazine informed churchgoers:

Our Belgian Guests
As the funds collected for the support of our guests at the Old Schools will soon be exhausted, a Public Meeting will be held in the Jubilee room on Wednesday, February 3rd at 6 pm to consider ways and means of providing further funds. The chair will be taken by Mr Willink. The meeting will be open to all parishioners, both men and women, and it is hoped that there will be a large attendance in order that the subject may be well discussed and some scheme of subscription adopted.


The March issue of the parish magazine reported on the meeting:

Our Belgian Guests
A Public Meeting, which was well attended, was held in the Jubilee Room on February 3rd, to consider ways and means of providing for our Belgian guests. A representative committee was elected, which has since met to consider the best means of raising funds. Dr Lake kindly undertook to act as Secretary and Treasurer, and it was decided to make an appeal to the generosity of the parishioners and to invite as many as possible to contribute a small sum weekly for three months, beginning on March 25th. It is thought that a certain number may be willing to give 6d a week, while others may prefer to give a lump sum, however small, to cover the three months. Will all those willing to help in this way kindly send their names and promises to Dr Lake, Brookfields, Burghfeld Common.

Burghfield parish magazine, February and March 1915 (D/EX725/3)

The cheerfulness and resignation of the Belgian refugees is beyond praise

The Burghfield parish magazine tells its readers a little more about the Belgian family they had welcomed to their midst:

OUR BELGIAN GUESTS
It will interest Burghfield people to know that Madame Schram and her two daughters, who have been living at Barnhey, by the kind permission of the Miss Vyners, are going to a little house prepared for Belgian Refugees near Silchester. We are sorry to lose them from Burghfield, but they will like a little house by themselves. Madame Rasquin could hardly be left alone, and through the kindness of Dr Lake accommodation has been found for her in the Refugees’ Home at Blackheath. Monsieur et Madame Laurent and their daughters remain at the old School, and no doubt their Burghfield friends will continue to be kind to them with little gifts of luxuries and clothing, for both of which they will be most grateful. Their cheerfulness and resignation, after the loss of all their earthly possessions, are beyond praise.

Burghfield parish magazine, January 1915 (D/EX725/3)