An act of gallantry and devotion to duty

A teacher who had served with distinction in the Royal Engineers was rewarded by a promotion when he got home.

Higher Education Sub-committee report
18 October 1919

MAIDENHEAD COUNTY BOYS’ SCHOOL

With regard to the Manual Room, a sectional part of one of the Hospital Wards at the Canadian Hospital at Cliveden was purchased for £100, and an estimate of Messrs Partlo of £108 for taking down, carting and re-erecting has been accepted….

WINDSOR COUNTY BOYS’ SCHOOL

There were 136 applicants for the post of Headmaster… The Governors selected Mr F Morrow, BA (NUI), the Second Master at the School. Mr Morrow was educated at Pocock College, Kilkenny, and has had 16 years’ experience as an Assistant Master, 10 years of which have been at the Windsor County Boys’ School. He has published a text book of practical geography. His war service was with the RE, in which corps he attained the rank of captain, and was awarded the MC for an act of gallantry and devotion to duty.

School Management Sub-committee report
18 October 1919

TEMPORARY WAR BUILDINGS FOR SCHOOL PURPOSES

The Board of Education have notified that HM Government have decided that huts required by Local Education Authorities for Educational purposes shall be sold to them at a discount of 33 % on the valuation.

The Secretary has been asked to make enquiries and report cases where these huts might be useful.

By-laws and Attendance Sub-committee report
18 October 1919

MEDICAL INSPECTION

Dr Napier, Assistant School Medical Officer, has returned from Military Service and resumed work on 29 September. Dr G R Lake, who has helped the Committee part time during the last four years, will cease work at the end of the present month. The Sub-committee have placed on record their appreciation of Dr Lake’s work which enabled them to carry on a curtailed scheme of Medical Inspection during the War.

Berkshire County Council minutes (C/CL/C1/1/22)

The happiness which the children were all expecting these first holidays of the Peace to bring

Clewer
Distribution of Prizes and Certificates

On Monday, July 28, the Rector of Clewer (the Rev. A T C Cowie) distributed the certificates and prizes won during the School Year. He then took the simple dismissal service, and gave a short address, in which he showed how the happiness which the children were all expecting these first holidays of the Peace to bring, depended on the spirit of unselfishness in their homes.

Speenhamland
July 28th

Letter from Office to say that an extra week’s holiday would be given this year in commemoration of the signing of Peace. We shall now re-open on Tuesday Sept. 9th.

Clewer: St Stephen’s High School Magazine, 1919 (D/EX1675/6/2/2); log book of St Mary’s CE School, Speenhamland (C/EL119/3)

Peace Treat

Children continued to celebrate peace.

Reading: All Saints Infant School
23rd July 1919

The school closes this morning (Wed) till Friday; on account of the swimming gala this afternoon; and the children’s Peace Treat tomorrow.

Wallingford Boys Council School
1919, 23 July

Visited, at about 12.10, by the Chairman of Managers, when it was decided that an extra week’s holiday should be given in response to the wish of HM the King (Peace Celebration).

Newbury
23/07/19

There will be a half holiday this afternoon by order of the Ed: Com: as the swimming sports are taking place.

Log books of All Saints Infant School, Reading (89/SCH/19/2); and Wallingford Boys Council School (SCH22/8/3); St Joseph’s Infant School, Newbury ( N/ES 7/1)

Half holiday

9/07/19
There will be a half holiday this afternoon and also tomorrow afternoon by order of the Education Committee for Sunday Treats and Victory loan processions respectively.

Log book of St Joseph’s Infant School, Newbury ( N/ES 7/1)

Special classes for soldiers

Students were getting back to normal on leaving the army.

MAIDENHEAD TECHNICAL INSTITUTE

The Sub-committee understand that the Technical Institute will probably be evacuated by the Red Cross Hospital authorities shortly…

EVENING CLASSES

In a circular letter, the Board of Education urge the importance of the resumption of the part of this work which was curtailed owing to the war and of its further development at the earliest possible date.

The Sub-committee have not found it possible to resuscitate any of the closed classes this session but have made provision in the estimates for increasing the number of classes next session.

ARMY EDUCATION

In connexion with the scheme for Army Education, the Sub-committee have been asked to arrange special classes for soldiers at Windsor and these have been duly held. The whole of the cost is payable by the War Office.

COUNTY SCHOLARSHIPS

The Sub-committee have allowed B L James (3rd year Senior Scholar), who was released from the Army in January to resume his Senior Scholarship at the Newbury Grammar School for the remainder of its period.

M G Hyder, who was granted a Supplementary County Scholarship in 1916, has been released from the Army, and took up his Scholarship at Keble College, Oxford, as from the commencement of the Lent Term.

The Sub-committee have renewed the Scholarship of E H Austin (who has also been released from the Army) at the University College, Reading, until the end of the Summer Term.

Report of Higher Education Sub-committee to Berkshire Education Committee, 3 May 1919, in Berkshire County Council minutes (C/CL/C1/1/22)

The work of the Navy in the Great War

Newbury children attended a lecture on the Navy.

Newbury St Nicolas CE (Boys) School
19th February 1919

A party of boys was taken, at the suggestion of the Education Committee, to a lecture at the Picture Palace on ‘The work of the Navy in the Great War’.

Newbury St Nicolas CE (Girls) School
28th February 1919

On the afternoon of Feb. 19th the upper classes attended an illustrated lecture on ‘The Navy’, at the Picture Palace.

Newbury St Nicolas CE (Boys) School log book (90/SCH/5/3, p. 48); Newbury St Nicolas CE (Girls) School log look(90/SCH/5/5, p. 244)

During demobilization the need of education in the Army would be greatly increased

Schools were still not back to normal.

Report of School Management Sub-committee, 18 January 1919

TEACHERS AND DEMOBILIZATION

The Board of Education have asked to be supplied with particulars as to the teachers in the County on Military Service, and state they will endeavour to secure their early release.

A subsequent letter, however, states that during demobilization the need of education in the Army would be greatly increased, and that it was now proposed that teachers now serving in the Army, if they so desire, might be re-enlisted for a period of one year after the cessation of hostilities. The Board of Education invite Authorities to consider how they can co-operate by holding open for teachers who re-engage the posts which now await them on their return.

The Sub-committee have pointed out to the Board of Education the difficulty experienced at the present time in carrying on owing to the number of Head Teachers on military service, and have urged on them the desirability of securing the release of these teachers as soon as possible. With this reservation, the Sub-committee recommend the [Education] Committee to accede to the request…

Report of Works Sub-committee of Education Committee, 18 January 1919

TEMPORARY BUILDINGS

The Board of Education have forwarded particulars of various types of temporary war buildings which might be suitable for use as temporary school buildings, and suggested that the Committee should communicate with the Secretary of the Lands and Buildings Reconstruction Committee, and ask to be informed when any of the buildings were coming up for disposal.

The Sub-committee have asked to be informed where any of these buildings can be seen.

Report of Bylaws and Attendance Sub-committee, 18 January 1919

SCHOOL MEDICAL SERVICE

Dr A Richmond has taken over the work of Acting School Medical Officer as from 1 January in place of Dr W Sisam.

The Sub-committee recommend that the Education Committee do place on record their appreciation of the work of Dr Sisam, show has during the last four years given his services as Acting School medical Officer without payment, in the absence of Dr G C Taylor on Military Service….

EPIDEMIC OF INFLUENZA

In November and December, the epidemic of influenza spread through the county and, with few exceptions, the schools were closed for periods of from a fortnight to six weeks on the advice of the Acting School Medical Officer. The percentage of attendance during the time the various schools were open was low, being in November 79 per cent….

Report of School Management Sub-committee, Berkshire County Council minutes (C/CL/C1/1/22)

The headmaster of Three Mile Cross has received his discharge from the army

Things were getting back to normal.

Husrt
13th January 1919

I have been informed by the Education Secretary that the headmaster of Three Mile Cross has received his discharge from the army, therefore Mr Darlington will return to Hurst Boys’ School.

Speenhamland
Jan 13th

Letter from Mr Jeeves to say that the children had collected £2.0.3 during the Christmas holidays for St Dunstan’s Hostel.

Log books of Hurst C of E Boys School (D/P73/28/23);St Mary’s CE School, Speenhamland (C/EL119/3)

A school treat to commemorate the end of the war

Wargrave children had an extra day off after a messy party, while it was more sober news in Boyne Hill.

Wargrave
November 19th 1918

The school was closed yesterday (18th) to enable the cleaner to clear the rooms after a school treat, which was held on Saturday to commemorate the end of the war.

Boyne Hill
Nov: 19th

War Loan takings today are £4.1.9.

Another death has been reported this afternoon.

Newbury
19/11/18

The school closes this afternoon until Monday Nov 25th by order of the education committee as the epidemic is still very bad.

Log books of Wargrave School (88/SCH/36/1); Boyne Hill Girls’ CE School (C/EL121/3); St Joseph’s Infant School, Newbury ( N/ES 7/1)

Closed for influenza

More Berkshire schools were affected.

Little Coxwell
Nov. 8th

The school will be closed by order of the Education Committee, owing to an outbreak of Influenza.

Upton
8.XI.18

School closed for two weeks on account of the Influenza Epidemic.

Log books ofLittle Coxwell CE School (C/EL80); Upton CE School (C/EL48/2)

Numbers so low, and sickness so rife

Influenza was taking its toll, and many schools would miss out on celebrating the armistice as a result.

Sonning
4th November 1918

On Monday 4th November only 22 boys presented themselves at school. I informed the Correspondent (Rev G.S Crawford) and he communicated with the B.E.C. The Secretary of the B.E.C acting on the advice of the school Medical Officer advised the closing of the school until Nov 18th.

Braywick
4th November 1918

School re-assembled as usual this morning but as the numbers were so low, and sickness so rife Dr Patterson ordered the school to close for a week longer.

Upton
4. XI.18

Henry Roberts and Francis Webb had their marks cancelled during the morning as they appeared to be suffering from influenza.

Milton
Nov 4th

I, Alice Andrews, take up my duties here as Head Mistress.
Owing to Influenza only 30 children assembled – sent for the Rector who advised me to wire to Reading – dismissed children to await instructions.

Boyne Hill
Nov: 4th

School reopened at 9 am with 172 present out of 201. The MOH has been notified.
The building has been thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.
Children have again been dismissed until Nov: 11th.

Log books of Sonning Boys school (89/SCH/1/2); Braywick CE School (C/EL65/4); Upton CE School (C/EL48/2); Milton CE School (D/P85/25/25); Boyne Hill Girls’ CE School (C/EL121/3);

Blackberries are for soldiers only

Warfield children did their bit.

The Warfield School War Savings Association is progressing steadily, and the members at present have invested well over £400. The purchase of the 15/6 certificates, which in five years becomes £1 is a splendid investment, and the officials would greatly welcome new members; the minimum weekly investment is only sixpence.

The elder scholars of the Day school had the unique experience of Blackberry picking in school hours last week. Accompanied by Miss Leach they searched the bushes and succeeded in gathering 400 lbs. in the time allotted by the Education Committee. The berries were sent in the M.O.F. hampers to the local agent at Wokingham, as they are for soldiers only.

Warfield section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, October 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/9)

Teachers over 45 years will not be called up for the present

The County Council continued to try to prevent all its male teachers from being called up to fight.

MILITARY SERVICE

The Board of Education have notified that, by arrangement with the Ministry of National Service, Teachers over 45 years on 1 January, 1918, will not be called up for the present. The age of protection for teachers in Grade II has been raised to 36 years on 1 January, 1918. At the present time the following arrangements are in operation as regards the protection of teachers:

Teachers in Grade III over 25 years of age on 1 January, 1918
Teachers in Grade II over 36 years of age on 1 January, 1918
All teachers over 45 years of age on 1 January, 1918

Since the last meeting, two Headmasters have been called to the colours, one leaves on 8 October; the calling up of another has been postponed till 31 October. The Board of Education have also recommended postponement in the case of the Headmaster of a large Mixed School in East Berks.

Berkshire County Council: Report of School Management Sub-committee, 12 October 1918 (C/CL/C1/1/21)

“The whole situation on the Western front was changed to our advantage”

The Rector of Remenham encouraged parishioners to give what they could.

Rector’s Letter

My Dear People,

With regard to the War, what cause for thankfulness was ours during the month of August: the whole situation on the Western front was changed to our advantage. Very humbly we have ground to hope that the Almighty has made bare his arm. In dark hours we knew that His care was over us; in the day of sunshine and success we acknowledge that “our sufficiency is of God”. We lift our hearts up unto the Lord.

I would call your attention to two appeals that are made to us in this issue of the Magazine. Please save all your fruit stones (plum, cherry, peach, nectarine, apricot, date) and hard nut shells; they are urgently needed for making charcoal for anti-gas masks to protect our fighting men. I shall be glad to receive at the Rectory between September 15 and 30 all stones and shells collected.

Then, secondly, urge the children to gather blackberries as soon as they are ripe; the Berkshire Education Committee are asking the head teachers to organise the effort throughout the county, and our headmistress is doing so for Remenham…

George H Williams

ANTI-GAS MASKS

Who will help our soldiers?

Mrs Barber, Culham Court, has received an urgent request from the Director-General of National Salvage asking us to collect fruit stones and nut-shells. They are needed for the production of charcoal for anti-gas masks, for the charcoal thus produced affords far greater protection to our soldiers against poison gas than any other known substance. The need will continue for the next two months. It is important that stones and nut shells should be forwarded in a dry condition; stones should be dried by being placed for a short time in the sun or in an oven. Will any one who is disposed to help, collect their fruit stones and nut shells, and send them, however small the quantity may be, to the Rectory any time between September 15 and 30?

BLACKBERRIES WANTED!

The Berkshire Education Committee has been asked by the Ministry of Food to arrange for the systematic picking and collecting of blackberries for jam making. Miss Mannion, the head mistress, is organising the collection by the school children of Remenham. A payment of 3d per lb will be made to the children for the amount collected, and they will be granted holidays for the picking expeditions. The picking should take place when the berries are ripe and dry. The children will work in organised parties under the supervision of their teachers, and they are warned to do no damage and to close all gates after them. All berries picked under this scheme must be reserved for Government use and none may be sold.

Remenham parish magazine, September 1918 (D/P99/28A/4)

Baskets for blackberries

A school in Sandhurst was particualrly involved in picking blackberries for jam, combatting food shortages.

September 4th 1918

At the request of the Education Committee I am organising the picking of blackberries for the Ministry of Food. Have received 18 baskets for use.

Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p.446)