On the eve of Victory Day

Work was progressing slowly on the Earley St Bartholomew war memorial porch.

The War Memorial

Those who are following the progress of this fund month by month will be glad of an account of the last committee meeting on July 18. Being on the eve of Victory Day the meeting was not well attended. This was unfortunate, but the fixture had been made. There were present – The Vicar in the chair, Mr Richard Brown, hon. Treasurer (his co-treasurer being on holiday and away from home), Mr George Love, Mr FC Edwards, Mr H Mole, Mr E Clayton Jones, Mr E Long, Mr H Masters, Mrs Newbery, Miss Goose, Miss H L Stevens, Mr D Lawrence, and Miss Ashcroft.

Collectors for Cumberland Road were appointed, Mr Long and Miss Stevens volunteering for this work. Subscriptions received to date were paid in, together with some new promises. The hon. Treasurer ereported at the close of proceedings as follows

Subscriptions paid or promised, as already announced £407 8s 1d
New subscriptions July 18 £32 5s 6d
New promises £5 5s 0d
Collection in church (Peace Sunday) £10 11s 5d

This figure, with a few pounds which came in after the meeting ended represents an increase of £50 from June 13 to July 18, and one which greatly encourages us to hope for a further advance by Sept 4 (Thursday) the date of the next committee meeting. The builder has made all the preparations for the work and is waiting for the working drawings of the stonework. At the present moment church architects are pressed with work, and we must wait patiently our turn. A drawing of the porch shewing the elevation as seen looking from S Bartholomew’s Road will shortly be hung in the church, and we invite everyone to study it.


Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, August 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

Advertisements

“This is not very encouraging to anyone who has undertaken a voluntary public work which interests and benefits everybody”

Perhaps some people just wanted to forget the war.

Most of the Forms sent out, to be filled in with the details of those who have served in the War, have now been received. There are however still some to come in. In some cases the collector has called five or six times without result. This is not very encouraging to anyone who has undertaken a voluntary public work which interests and benefits everybody. We feel sure that this, no doubt unintentional, lack of consideration only needs mentioning to be remedied, and that all outstanding forms will be returned at once to Miss G. Palmer, (The Briars, Ellis Road). As was pointed out last month these full and correct details are asked for in order that a complete list of all who have served may be made and preserved, and, in the case of the fallen, that their names may be placed on a Memorial, whatever form the Parish decides that such a Memorial shall take.

Wokingham St Sebastian parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P154C/28A/1)

As if anyone would ever wish to do such a thing as remove the war memorial!

An offer was made to pay for a war memorial in Stratfield Mortimer.

Another War Memorial

Colonel and Mrs. Nash have offered to present to the parish church a large brass tablet on which will be permanently recorded the names of all parishioners who have given their lives for their country during the war – a most welcome gift. This cannot be erected, however, without a “faculty” – a form of legal sanction, the chief value of which is that it prevents anybody from ever removing the memorial, (as if anyone would ever wish to do such a thing!) and a faculty cannot be obtained without the passing of a resolution in its favour by a vestry meeting. A vestry meeting for this purpose will therefore be held on Tuesday, July 8th, at 6-30 p.m., at the parish church vestry.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P120/28A/14)

Tea for all the inhabitants of the village

Sulhamstead planned to celebrate the war’s end with a party, while remembering the dead forever. Churchgoers were currently worshipping in a brand new building, built only in 1914 next to the previous church.

WAR MEMORIAL AND PEACE CELEBRATIONS

A Public Meeting was summoned by house-to-house circulation of printed notices on Monday, July 7th, with Sir George Watson, bart, as chairman. There was a larger attendance than usual, both of men and women.

A resolution was unanimously carried that a Memorial of those that had fallen should be erected on the site of the old Church. Other suggestions were made to use any balance of money that might be obtained, and these suggestions were deferred for future consideration.

It was decided to attempt to provide tea for all the inhabitants of the village, and to entertain them by means of sports or otherwise.

A Ladies’ Committee was appointed to carry out the catering and a Sports Committee for the entertaining. The Committees had power to co-opt and to act jointly whenever they wished.

The day of celebration was fixed for Saturday, July 19th. Sir George Watson was elected Chairman, Mr Clay Secretary and Treasurer.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, August 1919 (D/EX725/4)

A splendid and lasting tribute of our gratitude to God for the valour of our men

The vicar of Maidenhead St Luke, holidaying with a brother home from the front, liked the parish’s war memorial plans.

The Vicar’s Letter

Dear Friends and Parishioners,

I write this letter far away in the stormy Hebrides; where lochs abound, great winds blow, and sea birds and seals are as common as rabbits ought to be on Maidenhead Thicket.

I feel that the few days I have been away – much of it spent in travelling – must have thrown a great strain on my colleagues at a very busy time. I suppose I must plead that the Armistice, the hope of an early Peace, and my brother’s return, must be my excuse…

As regards the future, I am hoping that on June 30th, the Parochial Church Council and the War Memorial Committee may approve of the beautiful plans Mr Cheadle has drawn out for us. I believe the Borough memorial Committee close their appeal on June 30th. We shall then have a clear field, and shall not in any way spoil anyone else’s scheme. The Memorial Chapel will be (if adopted) a splendid and lasting tribute of our gratitude to God for the valour of our men. In it we can pray for all we love here or in the next world. We can draw near to the Fallen in our thoughts. We can meditate on the One Great Sacrifice and think of our own kith and kin who followed that example in no unworthy way. But if we do undertake this work we ought to carry it out as nobly as lies in our power.

I remain, Your faithful friend and Vicar, C E M Fry.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

We must not forget our brothers who have made the supreme sacrifice

Peace did not mean putting the past behind us.

The signing of the Peace Treaty is an appropriate moment for reminding our readers of the proposed War Memorial in S. Mary’s Church. We must not forget our brothers who have made the supreme sacrifice, and there must be many people who will only be too anxious to take their share in providing a permanent memorial. All donations should be sent direct to Colonel Justice, at Speen Court.

Speenhamland parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P116B/28A/2)

Raise the money in twelve months

Parochial Church Council

The First meeting of the St Luke’s Parochial Church Council was held on Wednesday, July 2nd, at 8 pm, in the Parish Room at the Vicarage. A good muster of members were present. The only business before the meeting was the consideration of the plans for the proposed War Memorial Chapel. After an exhaustive discussion, partly in the Vicarage and partly in the Church, it was decided to recommend definitely the smaller scheme, which will cost about £2,150, but to hope that money enough will be found for the complete scheme, which would cost about £3,000. An account has been opened in the London, County, etc Bank, in High Street, called “The St Luke’s War Memorial Fund”. Several subscriptions have already been paid into it. It is proposed that the Parish, excepting Furze Platt, shall be divided into sections of twenty-five houses, and that a large number of collectors shall be obtained, so that everyone may have an opportunity of contributing something to the scheme. The idea is to try and raise the money in twelve months, very largely, it is hoped, by monthly subscriptions. A big meeting will be called very shortly to launch the scheme.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, August 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

War memorial plans look beautiful

Future Events
Monday June 30th

I hope to hold a Meeting of the newly-elected Parochial Church Council and the War Memorial Committee at the Vicarage at 8 pm, to consider plans of the new Memorial Chapel. They look beautiful to me. Any change of date will be announced in Church.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, June 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

A house-to-house collection should be made at once

There was some progress with Winkfield’s war memorial plans.

THE WAR MEMORIAL

Another Public Meeting was held on June 26th, when the attendance was very poor. The Secretary reported that it had been found impossible to find a suitable site on which to move and add to the present Men’s Club Room as the only suitable land was not for sale; also the Y.M.C.A. could be of no help.

After some discussion, it was resolved that enquiries should be made as to the possibility of buying the land on which the present club room stands, with a view to enlarging this, and that there ought to be no longer delay in appealing funds. It was therefore decided that a house-to-house collection should be made at once to raise funds for putting up a Memorial Brass in the Church, and also to buy if possible the site of the Men’s Club Room in Winkfield Row, and the Caretaker’s cottage, with a view to enlarging the Club Room into a Parish Institute.

The estimated cost is about £600, and if the funds raised should not suffice, the question of the disposal of any surplus after the Brass has been erected, will be put before a meeting of the subscribers.

Since the meeting, it has been ascertained that the property required can be bought for £300.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, August 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/8)

Careful and repeated consideration of many war memorial designs

There was a U turn over the Mortimer memorial.

War Memorial

The recent public meeting reversed the decision of its predecessor, and unanimously agreed to place the Memorial at the Cross roads at the top of the hill near the Pound. Mr. Maryon’s design was accepted, after the committee’s careful and repeated consideration of many other designs. At least £500 is now asked for. An account has been opened at Lloyds Bank, Reading, and donors are asked to draw cheques to “Mortimer War Memorial or Bearer” and send them direct to Lloyds Bank. Smaller amounts should be sent in cash to the Hon. Sec. at Wisley, Padworth Road.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, June 1919 (D/P120/28A/14)

Lovely procession

The Bisham war memorial was dedicated.

18 June 1919

Memorial service in church, then processed through village to Cross for dedication. Bishop [of] Buckingham came. Most lovely.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)

“It was decided to place a Memorial on the wall”

There was progress towards a Newbury war memorial.

The War Memorial Committee came to the Church on June 18th at 2.30, to meet Mr C O Skilbeck, who came down from London to advise them, on behalf of the Oxford Diocesan Advisory Committee. It was decided to place a Memorial on the wall just near the Lady Chapel, and Mr Skilbeck gave the Committee the name of an architect who would draw up a design. As soon as this is settled upon, an appeal for funds will be made. To provide this Memorial, and to put the Westminster Chimes upon the Bells, may involve an expenditure of £200 or £250.

Newbury parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P89/28A/14)

The war will not, strictly speaking, have “terminated”, until the peace terms have been duly ratified

The war had still not technically ended, as the treaties had not been signed. But peace celebrations were in full swing.

Peace Celebrations

At a second General Meeting, on 17th June, the recommendation of the Committee that these celebrations should take the form of a Tea, with games, etc, for the children of the parish, was approved. “Children” to include all ages up to 14, and any still attending school over that age. By the time this magazine appears it is hoped that the German Representatives will have signed the Peace Terms. But Austria, Turkey, and Bulgaria remain to be dealt with, and moreover the war will not, strictly speaking, have “terminated”, until the terms have been duly ratified by the proper representative assemblies. No doubt, however, an official Peace Celebration Day will be proclaimed before this has taken place in all the countries concerned.

Meanwhile, as announced at the Meeting, the Military Authorities are arranging central functions for those who have served overseas, and there will be a gathering and entertainment in Reading.

War Memorial

At the same Meeting, further recommendations of the Committee were adopted, viz:

(a) The erection of a Cross in the Churchyard in memory of those who have fallen;

(b) The improvement of the Parish Recreation Grounds, in connection with a Sports Club to be formed.

It was referred to the Committee to raise two separate funds for these two objects (Peace Celebrations and War Memorial), the latter fund to be applied first to the Cross, and secondly to Recreation Grounds, etc.

Burghfield parish magazine, July 1919 (D/EX725/4)

A stormy meeting

Opinion in Bisham was divided over the parish’s war memorial.

16 June 1919

Meeting in evening at schools about war memorial in church. Rather stormy.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)

Gratitude for deliverance from the German menace

The War Memorial

The committee met on June 13.

Present: The vicar, the Rev. H B Mead, the two churchwardens, Messrs F B East, W B Waters, H Masters, E Long, G C Sturgess, H B Mole, E Clayton Jones, A H Salman, J A Murray, H Knapman, T R Stevens, F C Edwards, G C Love. Ladies: D A Lawrence, G Fanstone, E Type, N Driscoll, A L Martin, H L Stevens, S Goose, B Newbery. The appointment of Mr Richard Brown and Mr Frank B East as joint treasurers of the fund met with approbation. The newly elected treasurers proceeded to receive the first payments, and a first and most gratifying instalment, in cash and promises, the amount of £407 8s 1d was returned. It was resolved to ask the builder to proceed with the work with as little delay as possible. The committee adjourned to Friday 18 July.

This glorious start, recorded above, may rightly call for a word in these pages. There are hundreds of people round about the church who may like to have a share in this Memorial; and the generosity of the first givers will, we hope, move them to follow their example. As we may have said before, we do not want to beg anyone to give to our memorial porch; we only desire to ask them to decide whether or not they will show their gratitude for deliverance from the German menace in this way. Those who have given, and those who mean to give, know that a considerable sum must be yet obtained if the architect’s fee and builders expenses are to be met. We have a large and determined committee, and they may be relied upon to bring the matter under the notice of the parishioners and worshippers of the church. Outside these there are but a few that can be approached; the amount must be raised amongst ourselves, and we are confident that it will be raised.

Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)