Gratitude for deliverance from the German menace

The War Memorial

The committee met on June 13.

Present: The vicar, the Rev. H B Mead, the two churchwardens, Messrs F B East, W B Waters, H Masters, E Long, G C Sturgess, H B Mole, E Clayton Jones, A H Salman, J A Murray, H Knapman, T R Stevens, F C Edwards, G C Love. Ladies: D A Lawrence, G Fanstone, E Type, N Driscoll, A L Martin, H L Stevens, S Goose, B Newbery. The appointment of Mr Richard Brown and Mr Frank B East as joint treasurers of the fund met with approbation. The newly elected treasurers proceeded to receive the first payments, and a first and most gratifying instalment, in cash and promises, the amount of £407 8s 1d was returned. It was resolved to ask the builder to proceed with the work with as little delay as possible. The committee adjourned to Friday 18 July.

This glorious start, recorded above, may rightly call for a word in these pages. There are hundreds of people round about the church who may like to have a share in this Memorial; and the generosity of the first givers will, we hope, move them to follow their example. As we may have said before, we do not want to beg anyone to give to our memorial porch; we only desire to ask them to decide whether or not they will show their gratitude for deliverance from the German menace in this way. Those who have given, and those who mean to give, know that a considerable sum must be yet obtained if the architect’s fee and builders expenses are to be met. We have a large and determined committee, and they may be relied upon to bring the matter under the notice of the parishioners and worshippers of the church. Outside these there are but a few that can be approached; the amount must be raised amongst ourselves, and we are confident that it will be raised.

Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

Advertisements

A thank-offering for all the mercies God has shown us during the years of war

St Peter’s Church Committee

A Processional Cross has been presented to St Peter’s as a thank-offering for all the mercies God has shown us during the years of war.

The final list of subscribers to the Cross Fund, which is now closed:

The Vicar, Mr F Rogers, Canon Meara, Mrs East, Mr and Mrs Snow, Mrs Parkinson, Mrs Plaistowe, Mrs Arundell, Mrs Arnold, Mrs and Miss Wright, Mrs Warwick, Mrs Crowhurst, Miss Sperling, Mr and Mrs G Parkinson, Miss Leaver, Major and Mrs Boulton, Mrs and Miss Lilly, Mrs W Fuller, Mrs Newell, Miss Lenns, Mr and Mrs Warren, Mrs Adams, Mrs C West, Messrs G Woodwards, D Blay, Don. Blay, F Lovegrove, R Lovegrove, F Matthews, F Street, H Hill, F Davis, C Snow, R Potter, R Knibbs, F Potter, G Burfoot and B Perkins.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, June 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

Gratitude for deliverance

The Earley war memorial was on its way.

The War Memorial

The committee met on Friday 17 May.

Present: The Vicar in the chair, Mr. Churchwarden Brown, Messrs H Masters, A H Salman, G C Sturgess, T R Stevens, E Clayton Jones, H Mole, F B East, H knapman, F C Edwards, H A Box, A J H Wright, Mrs Newbury, Miss Driscoll, Miss G Fanstone, Miss Goose, Miss Type, Miss H L Stevens, Miss D Lawrence.

The architect’s design and drawings were on view and the builder’s specification and estimate were read. It was resolved unanimously that the work be carried out as soon as possible.

The Committee decided to keep the subscription list open, and to issue a subscription list with names of contributors on the completion of the work; also, that a monthly statement of sums raised should be published in the Magazine during the summer.

The Committee was of the opinion that only the names of parishioners who had laid down their lives should be inscribed on the panels, but they reserved their final decision upon this point.

The chairman urged that all contributions should be given in a spirit of thanksgiving and that this was not an occasion for an ordinary appeal for subscriptions. He thought many persons giving in such spirit would prefer to give (in whole or part) anonymously, but whether this was so or not, he hoped a sense of gratitude for deliverance would govern all gifts made.

The committee adjourned to Friday June 13.

Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, June 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

A thankoffering for deliverance from the great menace and peril, and a memorial in honour of those who had by their deaths saved England

There was an animated debate in Earley regarding the war memorial at St Bartholomew’s.

War Memorial Meeting

A well attended meeting of parishioners and worshippers at our church was held on March 13. The Vicar was voted into the chair, and set out the steps which had led to that gathering. He said he thought he might take it for granted that the desire of all of them was, first to make a thankoffering for deliverance from the great menace and peril, secondly to embody with this act of thanksgiving some memorial in honour of those who had by their deaths saved England. They had no wish merely to commemorate the event in history of the great European War of 1914-1918. Any memorial raised would have a religious character, and therefore might well be associated with the parish church. He said that the Parochial Church council, at whose instance this general meeting had been called, put forward two well considered suggestions as to the form the memorial should take; these were (1) the building of a large and useful north porch, with a record on the walls of the names of those who had given their lives; and (2) the panelling of the Lady Chapel and, if possible, the painting of some glass in that chapel. These were two suggestions only, and he invited more from the meeting.

On resuming his seat, Mr Crapp rose and advocated the painting of one or more of the windows in the church; Mr Box seconded this. Mr T Hayward proposed the decoration and completion of S. John’s chapel. Miss Matthews suggested the endowment of a memorial bed at the hospital and a mural tablet at the church; Miss E L Norris seconded this. Mr R Brown advanced the claims of the north porch and of the Lady chapel; Mr Whatley supported him.

In the discussion the following took part:- Mr Wright, Mrs Norris, Mr Lawrence, Mr Mole and others, and on a vote being taken 36 were given for the church porch, the Lady chapel scheme receiving 12 and second place. Questions were asked respecting the cost of building, and the chairman expressed some little doubt of their ability to raise a sufficient sum. However, his hesitation was not shared by Mr Frank East, whose comment evoked applause from the meeting. A committee was appointed to carry out the scheme. (List of names supplied).


Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, April 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

Lieutenant East lost his leg in the service of the Country and Empire

Men were starting to return from imprisonment.

COMMISSION IN THE AUSTRALIAN IMPERIAL FORCE

Mr and Mrs East, of Church Cottage, have received notification from General W Birdwood, CO, Australian Force, that their son, Mr Robert East, has been appointed Second Lieutenant from August 10th, 1917. The notification is dated 6/3/1918. It will be remembered that Lieutenant East lost his leg in the service of the Country and Empire.

RETURN OF PRISONERS OF WAR

The first prisoner of war to return to the parish has been Private Roland Pitherall, who returned at the beginning of November.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, January 1919 (D/EX725/4)

Until such time as Mr Hunt returns from Military Service

It was expected that soldiers would soon be demobilised and able to return to civilian jobs.

Dec: 16th
Bessie East, pupil teacher formerly attached to St Mark’s School, Cold Ash, has been transferred here until such time as Mr Hunt returns from Military Service.

Thatcham CE School log book (C/EL53/4)

A sad casualty

Two men with Sulhamstead connections had fought their final battle.

Sergeant Major Robert East, Australian Expeditionary Force, has been obliged to have his leg amputated, and has returned to Australia for further treatment. He was to have been raised to the rank of a Commissioned Officer, but this sad casualty has prevented it.

ROLL OF HONOUR

We regret to have to announce that Mrs Painter has received news from the War Office that her husband, Private Albert Painter, Royal Berks, has been posted as killed. He was taken prisoner by the Germans on March 21st, and died on March 24th.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, August 1918 (D/EX725/4)

So many are giving their lives for us that we may enjoy freedom, that we must be willing to make our smaller sacrifices and use our freedom unselfishly and for others

There was news of several Sulhamstead soldiers.

THE WAR

We congratulate Mrs Grimshaw upon her son’s latest honour. Captain Grimshaw, MC, has been awarded the Croix de Guerre, Senior Class (with Palm).

Mr Harry Frank Wise, Queen’s Own Oxford Hussars, who proceeded to France in October, 1914, has been given, on the field officer’s recommendation, rank as lieutenant.

We regret to record many casualties and one death since our last issue. Colour Sergeant Major Robert East, 3rd Battalion AIF, has been returned home seriously wounded. His leg has been amputated above the knee, and he lies in a very serious condition. It will be remembered that his brother, Private Amos East, was returned seriously invalided. At the same hospital as C. Sergeant Major Robert East is Gunner Reginald Briant Brown, RFA, son of Mr Brown of Jame’s Farm, Lower End, [who] is also lying wounded.

Private Albert Painter, 8th Berks Battalion, Stretcher Bearer, has been missing since March 31st.

Amongst others connected with the parish, we have received tidings of the death of Private Ernest Brown, RFA, son of the late Mr Henry Brown of the Kennels.

It is with great sorrow that we announce two deaths. Private Henry Bonner, 2nd Battalion, Royal Berks Regiment, was killed in action during the period from March 22nd to April 2nd. This is all the War Office can communicate.

The second death was that of the son, Samuel, of Mr and Mrs Locke. He was sent back to England wounded, died in Hospital at Reading, and was buried at Shinfield on May 14th. It is only a few months since his brother’s death. So many are giving their lives for us that we may enjoy freedom, that we must be willing to make our smaller sacrifices and use our freedom unselfishly and for others.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, June 1918 (D/EX725/4)

Home from the Salonika Front for training in a Cadet Corps

Customers at Sulhamstead Post Office supported a canteen at railway stations for soldiers on the move.

THE WAR

SOLDIERS’ CANTEEN, S.E.R.

The amount in the box held by Mrs Winchcombe at the Post Office for this purpose amounted to 2s 6d.

Sergeant James Price has returned home from the Salonika Front for training in a Cadet Corps. His brother, Corporal Stanley Price, has been sent from India to Egypt, to be trained for a commission in the Royal Air Force.

We regret that Private Amos East has been returned home seriously invalided. Private Enefer is still in hospital in London, suffering from wounds.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, May 1918 (D/EX725/4)

None can fail to see the Satanic origins of the war

The Community of St John Baptist, the Anglican Sisterhood at Clewer, were supporting the war in prayer.

December 4, 1915
My dear Associates,

The Novena of Prayer for the World War has begun, and very many of you will be joining in prayer with the Community, a cooperation which we value more than any other part of the activity of our Associates; and let us pray that our people may learn how to pray; they have much to learn, of not why so small a number at Intercession Services? Why the demand so often made that priests should join the colours, and fight at the front? The priest who celebrates daily, or often at his Altar, is doing more for his country than by fighting, however bravely, at the front. The real battle-ground is probably not Flanders, nor Gallipoli, nor anywhere else on earth, but the heavenly places themselves. Spiritual foes must be met by spiritual forces, and none can fail to see the Satanic origins of this present war, with all its unexampled cruelty, and murder, and its most skilfully organised campaign of lying, and treachery, both individual, and diplomatic.

As this letter reaches you, two of our Sisters, Sister Alexandrina and Sister Dorothea, will be on their way to India, in the P & O SS “Caledonia”. Two more, Sister Mary Frances and Sister Kathleen Prisca, will sail in the SS “Kaiser-I-Hind” on January 1st. I commend them to your prayers; the prayer “for those in peril on the sea” has now a new and terrible significance….

Arthur East, Warden CSJB

4 December 1915
Sister Alexandrina and Sister Dorothea started from here at 7.20 for Liverpool St & Tilbury Docks, where they embarked on the Caledonia for India. Mother went with them to London & returned in the afternoon. Two Sisters went to see them off at the Docks. Originally it had been arranged for them to start on the 27th Nov. in the Moldavia, but that ship was suddenly requisitioned by government.

Letters to Associates and Annals of the Community of St John Baptist, Clewer (D/EX1675/1/24/6; D/EX1675/1/14/5)

Sulhamstead and the wounded

News of new recruits and wounded men dominated the Sulhamstead parish magazine this month, as Sulhamstead House (now the Police Training College) joined the ranks of war hospitals.

THE WAR
Commissions

Mr Norman Watson has been given a commission of Second Lieutenant in the Kings Royal Rifles.

Mr General Merton has gained his “wings” after many months of practice in flying and has been appointed a Second Flight Lieutenant.

The Recruiting Sergeant has been busy in Sulhamstead and in the neighbourhood. At the time of going to press it is stated that nine more recruits have been obtained in Sulhamstead.

Wounded
We regret to hear that Lieutenant Grimshaw has been seriously wounded. Although a cavalry officer, he was serving in the trenches when he received his wounds from an explosion of shrapnel causing 18 wounds. He has been brought to Guy’s Hospital.

Robert East is also amongst the wounded, and is lying at the Hospital at Birmingham.

Lieut. Noel Carter was wounded in the trenches near Ypres some weeks ago, and was taken to the hospital at Fishmongers’ Hall, London. The Scouts will be glad to hear that he has recovered and is expecting to return to France.

CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL: SULHAMSTEAD HOUSE
Sir George and Lady Watson have opened their house as a Convalescent Hospital for the wounded. Fourteen wounded soldiers were sent from the Reading Base Hospital, of whom, ten had left at the time of writing, after more than a fortnight’s stay. They were very loth to leave as they had so thoroughly enjoyed their convalescent stage at Sulhamstead House.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, June 1915 (D/EX725/3)

Wait, work and pray at ‘the base’ while loved ones fight

Many of the women who belonged to Theale Mothers’ Union, a church-based group, were enduring the anxiety of having a husband or son at the Front. The May issue of the parish magazine announced a special meeting to address their special concerns:

THE MOTHERS’ UNION
Arrangements will be made, it is hoped, for a meeting of the members of our Branch on Thursday, May 20th. A short Service will be held in Church, with an address by the Rectory, at 3.30 p.m., to be followed by Tea in the Parish Room. Due notice will be given in Church, and by the District Visitors to the members individually. A Meeting for Prayer is particularly called for now that the husbands and sons of so many members are serving their King and Country, and in peril in the War.

FOR KING AND COUNTRY
Ezra East, of Calcot … Army Service Corps.
The Rector will be glad to receive further names.

The following month reported on the success of this meeting:

SPECIAL SERVICE OF INTERCESSION
The members of the Mothers’ Union, and the wives and mothers of all in the parish serving their King and Country, were invited to a Service in the Parish Church on Thursday, May 20th, at 3.30 p.m. The congregation numbered about 50. After the Whitsuntide Collect, the Mothers’ Union Prayer, etc. Psalm 91 was said, and was followed by the special Lesson, Romans VIII, 19 to 28. In his address the Rector said that the sacredness of Marriage was the root-principle of the Mothers’ Union, and the bond that united families, when our sailors and soldiers had gone forth to do their duty to their King and Country. Their wives and mothers were at ‘the base,’ where they had to wait and work and pray.

The Rector besought them in times of anxiety and depression not to regret that they had let their husbands and sons go forth, but to let the consciousness that they had done right comfort them, and hearten them to bear any sacrifice. They had also done their best for them. It was true of many a one who had responded to the high call, that it had made a man of him, it had made a Christian of him, it had made a hero of him. In this time of trial and anxiety may all seek the help of the Holy Ghost, the Comforter.

The names on the Roll of Honour, to the number of 67, were read out. Hymns 207 and 595 were sung, and a collection was made for the County Red Cross Society, amounting to £1 1s 6d. A receipt for this sum has been received from Mr. Haviland, Hon. Treasurer. After the service, those present were entertained at tea in the Parish Room, for which arrangements had kindly been made by Mrs. Snelling, Mrs. Forrester, Mrs. Rudd and Mrs. Charles Blatch, assisted at the tea itself by Mrs. Walford, Miss Bunce, Mrs. Angel-Smith and other ladies.

Theale parish magazines, May and June 1915 (D/P132B/28A/4)