“The last time I saw Sturdee was at the Falkland Islands”!

The American Commander in Chief, General John Pershing, British Admiral Doveton Sturdee and General William Birdwood were all granted honorary degrees from Cambridge after the war.

29 Barton Road
27 July ‘19

My very dear Smu

[Visiting Southwold, Suffolk] On Thursday 10th there came, with their crews, 2 armoured cars, which had been serving in Russia: and in the photographs sold in the shops next day, we recognised unmistakeably Mr and Mrs Image.

I see that I’ve only left a few inches to describe the Honorary Degrees on Wednesday 23rd – so I’ll enclose the paper I found on my seat. The figure I was most anxious to see was Admiral Sturdee. He looked like a Dean or an Archdeacon – an ecclesiastic of high degree. Just in front of me was a naval Lieutenant in uniform (with a pretty young wife) – so I appealed to him. He gave me all information quite simply – and as we rose to go, and watched Sturdee leave the Senate House, he said, “the last time I saw Sturdee was at the Falkland Islands”!! I was delighted to see a fellow who had been in that fight.

Pershing looked capable of sternness.

The u.g.s (who were all in their khaki) chaired Birdwood.

Our kindest remembrances to ye both.

Bild

Letter from John Maxwell Image to W F Smith (D/EX801/2)

Lieutenant East lost his leg in the service of the Country and Empire

Men were starting to return from imprisonment.

COMMISSION IN THE AUSTRALIAN IMPERIAL FORCE

Mr and Mrs East, of Church Cottage, have received notification from General W Birdwood, CO, Australian Force, that their son, Mr Robert East, has been appointed Second Lieutenant from August 10th, 1917. The notification is dated 6/3/1918. It will be remembered that Lieutenant East lost his leg in the service of the Country and Empire.

RETURN OF PRISONERS OF WAR

The first prisoner of war to return to the parish has been Private Roland Pitherall, who returned at the beginning of November.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, January 1919 (D/EX725/4)

“It is terrible trying to carry on war under such conditions”

General Callwell shared some secrets with former assistant Ralph Glyn, now at the Dardanelles.

26, Campden House Chambers
Campden Hill, W

13th December 1915

My dear Ralph

I am taking time by the forelock to drop you a line as the Bag does not go for a couple of days, but there is such a rush these times that it dies not do to leave anything to the end.

I am afraid the retirement from Suvla and Anzac will prove a costly business and it is deplorable that there was so much delay in deciding after Monro reported at the end of October. As a matter of fact the War Council decided on evacuation on the 23rd ult – while K was out in those parts – and Squiff sent me over to Paris to tell Gallieni and old man Joffre; but the Cabinet overrode the War Council and the decision was not finally taken by the Cabinet till the 7th. It is terrible trying to carry on war under such conditions.

The French have been very troublesome over Salonika. We and even our Government have been opposed to that affair all along, but the French managed to drag us into it by threatening to regard our refusal as a blow to the entente. Murray and I, backed up by Robertson, went to Chantilly to see old Joffre, but could not get him to change his mind, and then Squiff [Asquith] and three others of the same sort went over and saw the French Government, but it was no good. I went with Squiff and we had quite a gentlemanly trip in specials and Destroyers, but poor old AJB was a terrible wreck after a Destroyer trip. Then, although Gallieni lied to me gallantly about it, the French never sent that infernal fellow Sarrail orders to retire till his position was extremely awkward and in consequence our 10th Division had a very bad time; but they seem to have done well.

All kind of changes are in the air. Johnny French is to be degomme’ at once, Haig taking his place; and there is a good deal of talk about Robertson becoming CIGS – he caries heavier ordnance than Murray. Henry Wilson is very unhappy at Johnny French’s departure and I am not sure what will become of HW. I doubt whether Haig will have him in his present job and he has come to be looked upon as what the soldier detests – a political general.

The Government is rocky and Bonar Law told me the other day that he thought Gallipoli would finish them. He (BL) should have resigned when Carson did. When K was away in the east they all declared that they would not have him back, but he is back and does not look like going although he is much tamer than he was. He said to me plaintively the other day that the Cabinet would not believe anything he told them and now always insisted on a printed paper from the General Staff. It was rather amusing at a War Council the other day while he was out your way. They were squabbling away about everything after the usual fashion when a box was brought in to Squiff and he read out a wire from K, ending up with an announcement that he was coming home. With one voice the whole gang said he must go to Egypt to report and a wire to that effect was drafted on the spot – however he took no notice and came home in spite of them.

I hope that you are fixed up and getting on well with your RNAS affairs. As Helles is not to be evacuated I suppose that the bulk of Sykes’ commando will remain where it is although there will be plenty of work for airmen in Egypt shortly. I am writing to Bell before the Bag goes and also to Birdwood.

Yours ever
Chas E Callwell

Letter from General Callwell to Ralph Glyn (D/EGL/C24)

“An engaging personality, but not a convincing one”

Sybil Campbell was not impressed by Sir Ian Hamilton, the commander in charge of the Dardanelles expedition.

32 Addison Road
Kensington, W
Nov. 10/15

I met Sir Ian Hamilton at a small dinner the night you were here. I asked him [whether?] 12 ships had been lost, had the Dardenelles [sic] been forced. “More likely 5” was the answer. But – if not supported on land? He believes with material we shall get thro’; but he said a retreat meant the Turk’s bayonet in the back of the rear guard, & the sea for drowning. He was very human & indiscreet. I asked about Ralph. He said “very brilliant, & snubbed by GHQ as all men of ideas are”. Told me he was now in the Flying Corps, or rather on its Staff.

Asked, how did I know him, “only aunt”, I replied. He was much surprised. He looks wasted to a shadow & told me of the enteritis diarrhoea the germ produces, the same can enter the bile ducts & give jaundice which I suppose made R. look so yellow. I think you will find K. is there, & not soon to return. It may be it is he or Birdwood who will get “the Gloire”. Ian Hamilton is an engaging personality, I have long known him, but not a convincing one…

Yrs gratefully
[Sybil]

Letter from Sybil Campbell to Lady Mary Glyn (D/EGL/C31)

The War Office is “bearing up” in the absence of Kitchener

General Callwell shared the latest top secret information with Ralph Glyn. Lord Kitchener had been unconvinced by the report in favour of withdrawal from the Dardanelles, and was set to inspect the front for himself. A junior War Office official friend also wrote to Ralph.

War Office
6th November 1915

My dear Ralph

Many thanks for your long letter of the 28th. Things have changed a good deal and you will have your friend K out with you long before you get this.

He is all for hanging on or doing something at Gallipoli. The Government and War Council are all for accepting Monro’s recommendation and clearing out while there is yet time. I do not know how things will pan out when K gets out and he has been blarneying the French while in Paris, but I doubt if he has got much change out of the really. We are bearing up under his departure. He will not come back here. I expect that Carson, Lloyd George or Austin will be War Minister – the first I hope. Henry Wilson is over here on leave and in his element intriguing with all these politicians.

Mind you get Birdwood to send on an application of yours to get back from the Reserve. I wrote to Bell about this but as he is off to Salonika that will not work. Applications must come from FM Ex Force or from COG Medforce.

Yrs
Chas E Callwell

War Office
Whitehall
SW
6th Nov 1915
My dear Glyn

Great excitement yesterday about Lord K’s rumoured resignation. It was actually in our edition of the evening paper, and then contradicted. He has now disappeared for 3 weeks and Asquith has reappeared in the War Office.

I hope you are well and have a fairly comfortable dug-out, if you are still in Gallipoli.

Yrs
R A Ingram


Letters to Ralph Glyn (D/EGL/C24)

Rather a drag in operations at the Dardanelles

General Charles E Callwell wrote again to Ralph Glyn on the latter’s way back from his mission to organise ammunition for Gallipoli. He had some inside information regarding Cabinet discussions.

War Office
14th August 1915

My dear Ralph

Many thanks for your letter from Marseilles. You are one of those people who possess the gift of getting things done and I highly appreciate your successful efforts to rush that ammunition stuff through so satisfactorily and rapidly, and I am taking care to let Braithwaite know that the Medforce in reality owes its receipt mainly to you – I am assuming that you have not been submarined or wrecked or any dreadful thing. I told Winston the other day that Lord K had gathered somehow that you had been relling him (Winston) about ammunition requirements at the Dardanelles and had not been pleased. Winston was full of regrets but added “Well, after all it was worth it”.

Your wire from Marseilles about your transport going through went to QMG2 before I ever saw it, hence the return wire. The only way to make sure that a wire intended for me goes to me in this place seems to be to address it by name. Wortley has always been an opponent of anything going by the Marseilles route and was I think a little surprised and chagrined to find its advantage so clearly demonstrated thanks to you.

I had not heard of Sykes’ mishap and hope that he is all right again both on his own account and in view of the importance of having him fit and well for the work out at the Dardanelles. We are watching the progress of events out there anxiously, as there seems to have been rather a drag in the operations after the first landing at Suvla Bay just at the moment when it was all-important to push and get as much ground as possible. They also seem to be in a good deal of difficulty in respect to water at that point, but this will probably right itself as they settle down. I trust that things are getting cleared up at Mudros where it is evident that there has been shocking congestion of traffic, coupled with want of push by somebody to get things done and straightened out.

They are having the devil of a Cabinet Sub-committee to recommend what forces we should be prepared to put in the field next year. Crewe and Curzon and Austin and Selborne and Winston and Henderson, and I had a long afternoon with them yesterday. Curzon and Austin are towers of strength, Crewe makes a suave chairman, Winston talks infinitely and Henderson tells inappropriate anecdotes. I daresay that in due course they will adumbrate something useful, but in the meantime they want a lot of information which I am sure K will jib at giving them. They all seem to be for compulsory service, but were not inclined to fall in with my urgings that there should be an announcement of the intention at once in view of its moral effect upon Allies and enemies.

Your Italian friends have not done much beyond talking at present, but Delme Radcliffe writes that he was taken aside on the battlefield the other day by Porro and Cadorna and that the latter was very sympathetic and made a lot of enquiries. Why they will not go to war with the Turks I cannot make out, seeing that the Turks have so stirred up Tripoli against them that they have not got much more dry land left than Birdwood has at Anzac.

Yours ever

Chas E Callwell

Letter from General Charles E Callwell to Ralph Glyn c/o the British Embassy at Athens (D/EGL/C24)

Tell the Italians everything in the Dardanelles is splendid

General Charles Callwell, Ralph Glyn’s boss at the War Office, gave him a special mission to the Dardanelles. General Walter Braithwaite was Chief of Staff for the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force at the Dardanelles, where Sir Ian Hamilton was in command. Also mentioned here are Sir Aylmer Hunter-Weston, Edward Mabbott Woodward, William Birdwood, and General Charles Delme-Radcliffe, head of the Italian Military Mission.(D/EGL/C24)

War Office
26th June 1915

My dear Glyn

It is easier to give you your instructions in the form of a private letter than as a formal memorandum.

I want you to go out to the Dardanelles and to get back again as soon as you can, subject to fulfilling your mission effectually. In respect to points that you report on officially, please consult Braithwaite, or the CRE, or the QMG, or the principal authority concerned, as the case may be, because Lord K wants you to act as a channel and act as a source. There will no doubt be many other matters suitable for you to report on privately to me by letter, or when you get back. In any official report it is best to keep to individual subjects; ie, if there are ten things to report on make out ten reports.

I am writing to Braithwaite to let him know about you, but will also wire in a day or two, heralding your advent. Please give my respects to Sir Ian and my love to Braithwaite, Hunter Weston and Woodward; also if you see Birdwood please tell him how much I appreciate his letters – I have not time to write to him this week. You will of course see Cunninghame; tell him that he is doing admirably where he is.

On your way back I should like you to pay a flying visit to the Italian GHQ – at Bologna I think it is. You would be able to let the Italian General Staff know how things are progressing – of course saying that everything is splendid – and it would be a piece of civility. I will let Delme Radcliffe know of this and you should of course wire to him from Athens or Rome and make sure that you are expected. But I do not want you to go if it means delay in your getting back here beyond one, or at most two, days.

Yours sincerely

Chas E Callwell

Letter from General Charles Callwell to Ralph Glyn’s (D/EGL/C24)