The lives of these PoWs seem to depend on the food sent them from England

PoWs depended on food sent from home.

Mrs. Barnett has undertaken to collect eggs for the Reading Branch of the National Egg Collection for Wounded Soldiers. Gifts of eggs will be gratefully received at the Vicarage.

The Vicar has had an appeal to help to collect for the Royal Berkshire Regiment Prisoners of War Fund on May 11th. 1918.

The Care Committee are responsible for sending parcels of food to 405 prisoners and bread to 473, the cost of which exceeds £14,000 per annum — £2000 of which is spent on bread. This is a very urgent matter as the lives of these men seem to depend on the food sent them from England. The Vicar will gladly receive donations, large and small, and if they are sent to him before May 11th he will forward them to the Committee as a gift from Bracknell.

Bracknell section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, May 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/5)

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War charities registered

The County Council’s War Charities Sub-committee had been busy registering local war charities, ranging from bandage making to Christmas gifts for the armed forces.

REGISTRATIONS

Since the last report to the Council the following applications for registration under the War Charities Act, 1916, have been approved, and the Clerk has been instructed to issue certificates and to notify the Charity Commissioners:

No of Cert. Name of Charity Applicant

21 Bracknell War Work Depot (Queen Mary’s Needlework Guild) Mrs Littlewood, Hillside, Bracknell

22 Hanney Xmas Tree Fund for men serving HM Forces H. Leslie Edwards, schoolmaster, Hanney

23 Bracknell Xmas Parcels Fund Canon H. Barnett, Bracknell Vicarage

24 Bradfield District of Berkshire Branch of British Red Cross Society C J Haviland, Mead House, Bradfield

25 Bracknell Oaklea Auxiliary Hospital Mrs L A Berwick, Sunny Rise, Bracknell

26 Crowthorne Waste Paper Collection of War Charities Miss H M M Moody, Ferndene, Crowthorne

27 Wargrave Woodclyffe Auxiliary Hospital W. Ryder, The Little House, Wargrave

28 Wokingham Work Guild Mrs H M Lomax, Frog Hall, Wokingham

29 South Easthampstead District of Berkshire Branch of British Red Cross Society Miss E Monck, Aldworth, Crowthorne

30 Heatherside Auxiliary Military Hospital Miss E Monck, Aldworth, Crowthorne

31 Finchampstead Belgian Refugees S F Smithson, The Old Rectory, Finchampstead

32 Maidenhead Rural North Branch of British Red Cross Society Mrs Carpendale, Pinkneys Green

33 Hungerford Sailors and Soldiers Xmas Parcel Fund E C Townshend, Willows Close, Hungerford

34 Finchampstead Hospital Supply Depot Miss L M Hopkinson, Wyse Hill, Finchampstead

35 Bourton War Hospital Supply Depot Mrs W H Ames, Church Farm House, Bourton

36 Hungerford District of Berkshire Branch of British Red Cross Society A S Gladstone, JP, Wallingtons, Hungerford

37 The VAD Red Cross Hospital, Hungerford A S Gladstone, JP, Wallingtons, Hungerford

38 The VAD Red Cross Hospital, Barton Court, Kintbury A S Gladstone, JP, Wallingtons, Hungerford

39 Twyford and Ruscombe War Committee Rev. R W H Acworth, Twyford Vicarage

40 Sonning and Woodley Surgical Requisites Association Mrs C Christie Miller, The Deanery, Sonning

41 Mortimer VAD Hospital Miss F M Wyld, Highbury, Mortimer

42 Waltham St Lawrence Prisoners of War Fund Claude M Warren, Old School House, Shurlock Row

43 Wokingham South Rural District of Berkshire Branch of British Red Cross Society Mrs A M Western, The Coppice, Finchamapstead

44 Registered in error – subsequently cancelled

45 Ascot Military Hospital Miss Nora Collie, Ascot Military Hospital

46 Wantage District of Berkshire Branch of British Red Cross Society Miss Gertrude Elliott, Ginge Manor, Wantage

47 Binfield Popeswood Auxiliary Hospital Henry E A Wiggett, White Lodge, Binfield

48 Spencers Wood Local Red Cross Fund Rev. F T Lewarne, Spencers Wood, Reading

49 Faringdon District of Berkshire Branch of British Red Cross Society Henry Procter, Gravel Walk, Faringdon

EXEMPTION CERTIFICATES (to 7 January, 1917, only)

2 Burghfield Sailors and Soldiers Xmas Parcel Fund H G Willink, JP, Hillfields, Burghfield

3 East Challow Xmas Presents Concert Fund Miss E B Vince, Manor Farm, East Challow

4 Kintbury Xmas Presents Fund Mrs Alice G Mahon, Barton Holt, Kintbury

Report of War Charities Sub-committee of BCC, 20 January 1917 C/CL/C1/1/20)

Home on leave

A Sandhurst teacher had time off to see her brother before his return to the Front.

January 15th 1917
Miss E. Barnett absent, her brother being on leave from France.

Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p. 385)

Reported wounded and missing long ago in Gallipoli

Children and adults in Bracknell contributed what they could to the war.

EGGS FOR THE WOUNDED.

During the last seven months from January, 1916, 1,106 eggs have been sent to Reading for the National Egg collection.

I should like to take this opportunity to thank on behalf of the Soldiers all those who have sent eggs, and also Mr. Barnard, who has most kindly conveyed them to Reading free of charge. I hope that everyone will continue to send as many eggs as possible each week either direct to the Vicarage or to Mr. May, High Street.

A.M. BARNETT.

WAR WORK.

Names of some of the Bracknell Children who have lately sent knitting to the War Work Depot:- Ethel Brant, Alice Cheney, Phoebe White, Amelia Quick, Phyllis Gough, Dorothy Gale, Mary Wera, May Rance, Grace Fowler, Evelyn Townshend, Margery Metson, Ethel Morley, D. Townshend.

We regret the news has now come through that Jack Franks, who was reported wounded and missing long ago in Gallipoli, is dead. He was one of our choir boys, and though it is now some years since the family left Bracknell, many of us remember him very well, and much sympathy is felt for his mother.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Magazine, August 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/8)

“The wonderful collections of eggs … are so much appreciated”

The eggs collected by children and others for the wounded were much appreciated.

The following letter has been received by Miss A. Barnett acknowledging the eggs which have been sent to the Reading Hospital for the wounded:-

Hartley Court, Reading
August 3rd, 1916.

Dear Madam, –

I am so extremely grateful to you for the wonderful collections of eggs you have been sending us. They are so much appreciated now, as the hospitals are so full here, and they say they are the most valued gifts they have. Will you please sat how much obliged we are to the school children and others for thinking of the wounded.

Yours sincerely,

ADA DE BATHE.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Magazine, September 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/9)

An “exhibition of heartless callousness on the part of race-goers at this present crisis”

Churchgoers thought the continuance of horse racing during the war was unpatriotic.

THE BISHOP’S MESSAGE

The following extracts are from the Bishop’s message in the June Diocesan Magazine:

Your prayers are asked specially
For the preparation of the National Mission…
For the maintenance of the unity of the nation.
For victory in the war, and peace.
For wisdom in dealing with the conscientious objectors….

RACE MEETINGS DURING THE WAR

The following resolution was passed unanimously by the Sonning deanery. A great deal of indignation was felt and expressed at the motor traffic on the Bath Road during the Newbury Races:

“That this meeting of clergy, laymen, and laywomen, representatives of parishes in the Sonning deanery, in the diocese of Oxford, protests against the exhibition of heartless callousness on the part of race-goers at this present crisis, and calls upon His Majesty’s Government to reconsider the question of racing during war-time; and urges all earnest churchpeople to strive to show a spirit of self-sacrifice at this time.”

WAR MEMORIALS

I feel sure that a great many clergy, churchwardens and others would wish for advice about proposed war memorials as time goes on. Accordingly, I have asked the following (their number will probably be slightly increased) to act as a consultative committee:
Canon Ottley, Canon Herbert Barnett, the Revs. F J Brown, Sydney Cooper, W C Emeris and E J Norris, Mr F N A Garry, and Mr F C Eeles. Anyone wanting the help of this committee should write to the Rev. W C Emeris, the Vicarage, Burford, Oxon.

C OXON

Earley St Peter parish magazine, June 1916 (D/P191/28A/31/6)

A window to keep alive for ever the memory of their gallant service

The tragedy of two brothers killed within a week of one another in the first few months of the war led to a beautiful stained glass window at Holy Trinity Bracknell.

The Church has been beautified by the erection of a new window which has been given by Mrs. Van Neck in memory of her two sons who have fallen in the war.

Under one window there is the following inscription: “To the Glory of God and in loving memory of Philip Van Neck, Lieut. Grenadier Guards, who fell in action at Kriessk, Belgium, on 26th October, 1914, aged 27”, and under the other, “To the Glory of God and in loving memory of Charles Hylton Van Neck, Lieut. Northumberland Fusiliers, who fell in action at Herlies, France, on 20th October, 1914, aged 21.”

It will be seen that these two young officers were both killed in the same week; they were well known to us in Bracknell when they were boys, and we greatly appreciate the honour of having this window in our Church to keep alive for ever the memory of their gallant service.

The collection of eggs for the wounded is going on apace. Last week 12 dozen were sent, more than half of which were brought by the scholars of the Ranelagh School. A few came from Bullbrook School and the rest from various contributors. Now that the eggs are plentiful, we hope to keep up a good supply. Anyone who wishes to contribute an egg or more will remember that they should be sent to Miss Avice Barnett at the Vicarage by 12 o’clock on Monday, or to Mr. May, Corn Dealer, High Street. They are sent to the National Egg Collection for the wounded (Reading Branch). We have to thank Mr. Barnard for conveying them to Reading free of charge.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Monthly Magazine, April 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/4)

Each one of us who is safe at home should do his bit to uphold those in the danger zone

Bracknell people were contributing in various ways. Hilda Mount, who co-ordinated funds to support British PoWs, was the wife of William (later Sir William) Mount, MP for Newbury, and is the great grandmother of current Prime Minister David Cameron.

C.E.M.S BRANCH INTERCESSION SERVICES.

Attention is called to this service of our own, and continued at our request, on Friday in the Parish Church, at 9.15p.m. When we think of the self-sacrifice of our men at the Front, for our sakes, for our families and for our Country, it goes without saying that each one of us who is safe at home should do his bit to uphold those in the danger zone. Not one of our members should be avoidably absent from these services.

BERKSHIRE REGIMENT PRISONERS’ FUND.

Contributions in small sums are collected by Miss J.E. Barnett, Oaklea, and sent at the beginning of each month to Mrs. Mount, the wife of one of our Berkshire M.P.’s, for the benefit of those Prisoners who are dependent on gifts sent to them from England. The smallest contribution is very welcome.

EGG COLLECTION FOR HOSPITALS.

Miss Avice Barnett has been receiving a few eggs all through the winter and sends them to Reading every Friday for the benefit of the wounded soldiers. Now that eggs are getting more plentiful she is receiving more, and in the future they will be sent to Mrs. de Bathe at Reading, who after sending 500 a week to the Reading War Hospitals, despatches the rest to the National Egg Collection, whence they are distributed to Hospitals abroad and at home as they are needed. The number required is so great that the need can never fully be supplied.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Monthly Magazine, March 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/3)

Wargrave supports a Diocesan Hut

Wargrave joined the Diocese of Oxford in aiding spiritual support for the soldiers at the Front.

Church Army Huts

There is abundant testimony to the value of the work done by the Church Army for the Soldiers at the Front and several efforts are being made in the Diocese to help it.

Canon Barnett, Vicar of Stoke Poges is Hon. Treasurer for a fund to supply an “Oxford Diocesan Hut,” in France. The cost is £400. The Bishop has opened the list with £10.

The Church of England Men’s Society is doing its best to raise money or Chaplain’s Huts, all of which will be under the Church Army. The Wargrave Branch has undertaken to do its share and all the members have made themselves responsible for Collecting Cards.

Wargrave parish magazine, January 1916 (D/P145/28A/31)

Christmas parcels

There was an interdenominational effort in Bracknell to co-ordinate sending Christmas gifts to the men at the front.

Christmas parcels have been sent to all the men who are on active service both in the Navy and the Army. The Chavey Down men received their parcels through the working party on the Down. The members of the Congregational Church and P.S.A. sent to those connected with their organizations, and the remainder, about 70 in number, were provided for by subscriptions contributed by many in Bracknell.

Grateful letters of acknowledgement have come from a large number of the men, who desire the Vicar to thank all the Bracknell friends who contributed; the contents of the parcels seem to have been much appreciated.

The parcels were packed by Mrs. Barnett at the Vicarage, with the kind assistance of Mr. Payne and Miss Hunton. The contents of the parcels were such things as biscuits in tins, cake, Oxo, potted meat, milk and cocoa, chocolate, apples, soap, candles and cigarettes.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Monthly Magazine, January 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/1)

Employ women to release men for other work

Women were wanted to work in non-nursing roles in military hospitals which had hitherto been the preserve of men.

We are asked to call attention to the following notice and to say that information respecting it can be obtained from Miss Barnett, Oaklea.

WORK IN WAR HOSPITALS TO RELEASE MEN.

Attention is called by the Board of Trade to the arrangements recently made with regard to the supply of women for employment by the War Office in certain departments of military hospitals, to enable men to be released for other work. Under these arrangements women will be employed as cooks, storekeepers, dispensers, and on various clerical duties.

The Red Cross Society will select the women for this work from their own members, and also from women whose names have been submitted to them from the Board of Trade Labour Exchanges. All women on appointment will be required to become members of a Voluntary Aid Detachment of the British Red Cross Society, if they have not already done so, though it will not be necessary for them to hold the first aid or nursing certificates usually required in this connexion.

Particulars as to the terms of appointment and the necessary qualifications may be obtained from the any of the Board of Trade Labour Exchanges.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Magazine, October 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/10)

A right minded boy does his duty and dies gloriously

Bracknell had lost its first man to the war – a young career soldier remembered locally for his football skills, with many others joining up.

The following is a list of those who belong to the Parish of Bracknell, and who are in the habit of attending Bracknell Church, who are now serving in H.M. Forces.

NAVY.
R.-Admiral Dudley de Chair, Cecil Bowler, E. Cordery, G. Freeman, G. Jenkins, A. Mott, C. Pleass, H. Roe, R. Watson, E. Wild.

MARINES
E. J. Brailey, R. H. Hester, E. S. Simmonds, C. H. Johnson, W. G. Johnson, J. H. Johnson, F. Gray, Charles Gambriel, G. Jenkins, S. Plummer, A. Prouten.

Many of these are in the North Sea.

ARMY
On Active Service.
Lieut. W. Foster, Lieut. W. Mackenzie, Captain W. K. George, H. Baker, Henry Barlow, Reginald Bowler, George Bowles, John Brant, G. H. Butcher, F. Butler, Alfred Case, Daniel Chaplin, L. Claridge, G. Clarke, N. Clarke, H. Currey, H. Downham, F. Dolby, M. Fox, W. Grimes, F. Harvey, H. Hollingsworth, A. Isaacs, B. Linnegar, A. Mason, H. Matthews, G. Morton, A. Newton, H. Norman, F. Offield, F. Rathband, R. Sadler, B. Sone, A. Winfield, C. Young, A. Penwell (India), S. Norman (Malta), W. Notley, A. E. Reed.

In England
Col. Sir W. Foster, Bart., Lieut. J. C. L. Barnett, Lieut. B. Foster, H. Alder, James Bowyer, John Bowyer, G. Brant, H. Bristow, C. Burt, C. Cave, C. Church, W. Clark, F. L. Dean, C. Dyer, W. Dyer, C. W. Ellis, F. Fitzhugh, J. K. George, E. Godfrey, F. Goddard, H. Gray, J. Gray, Ernest Gambriel, H. Gregory, S. Grimes, A. Holloway, H. Hoptroff, C. Hoptroff, G. Hoptroff, T. H. James, A. Jenkins, G. Kent, S. Kidley, R. Larcombe, J. Lawrence, L. Linnegar, E. Mason, G. Mason, H. Marshall, W. Norris, E. Noyes, H. Perrin, A. Pither, J. Pither, W. Pither, A. J. Prouten, S. Rixon, A. Readings, W. Sargeant, R. Sargeant, D. Sargeant, A. E. Searle, S. Sone, W. Spencer, H. Thompson, P. Treble, W. Turner, B. Turner, H. Webb, F. Webb, A. Winter, G. Winter, H. Winter, J. Wooff, R. Wright, A. Youens, E. Willman.

Two young men belonging to Bracknell have come over with the Canadian Contingent and will shortly be at the Front, – William Searle, and C. Berry.

Drummer Eric W. Roe of the Grenadier Guards is the first of our Bracknell men whose name is placed on the “Roll of Honour.” (more…)