On a football field in France

Old Boys from St Bartholomew’s Grammar School in Newbury shared their news.

Several letters have come our way from O.N.’s, among them being one J. Allee, who wants to know if there are any other O.N.’s in Palestine, where he is serving as a Captain in the A.S.C., as he has seen no one but Brooks since he has been there, for nearly three years. He seems rather disappointed with Jerusalem, but says that the country around the Dead Sea and the Jordan was well worth seeing, the hills being ablaze with flowers.

H. Pappin, in another letter, tells how he met Newman on the football field in France, where they both had been picked for the same team, the latter recognising Pappin’s name in the list. There seems a favourite place of recognition, for it was in Egypt that Pappin met Hobbs and Beard under similar circumstances. He has been running his battery team, “The Lily Whites,” all the winter, a combination in which what is lacking in science is made up with enthusiasm.

Two most interesting letters have come to us from F. W. Taylor and W. H. Bradfield. The former, who is serving with the Nigeria Regiment at Zungeru, has met our plea for an article by saying that he is writing a Grammar of the Fulani Language, but promises to do his best; while Bradfield, who is with the R.F.A. in France, is in the thick of the present heavy fighting.

J. J. Hurrell, who left the N.G.S. for Bradfield College, in 1913, has just passed through Sandhurst and goes into the Indian Army in September.

A double good fortune is the lot of D. W. Rosling, who is serving at Salonica; for simultaneously with his majority comes the following announcement: May 28th, at Cambray House, Carmarthen, to Florence, wife of Major D. W. Rosling, The King’s Liverpool Regiment, the gift of a son. – Congratulations.

We also have to congratulate two O.N.’s on their marriages; Lieut. E. J. Widle, T.M.B., to Miss Daphne Collette, at St John’s Church, Oxford; and Henry Hoskings, 1st Life Guards, to Miss Phyllis Richens, at St Anne’s, Westminster.

Our casualties are again heavy, though the proportion of wounded is, as last term, small. A. B. V. Brown and I. C. Davidson are both in hospital in England, after having been gassed, while A.L. Sandbach has been discharged through his wounds, after an exciting career. Volunteering for service on the outbreak of hostilities in Africa, he served against German West Africa, under Botha, in Greyling’s Commando, where he was one of the sole two white men serving. German West having been quelled, he returned to his civil duties, but soon after answered the call for men for German East. This time he joined the 2nd South African Horse, with whom he saw some hard fighting, on one occasion having his horse shot from under him. He was promoted to Sergeant and served for about three months longer, after which time he was hit in the thigh by shrapnel at Germinston, with the result as stated that he has been invalided out, returning to his work at Johannesburg. By a curious coincidence, each of these in this branch of the list is an old Victor Ludorum, Sachbach having also tied with Evers for a second year, while the dates of Brown and Davidson respectively, are those immediately preceding the War.

I. K. Fraser, whom we reported as having been wounded, in our last number, has so far recovered as to be able to pay us a visit towards half term. He is looking remarkably fit in spite of all.
Congratulations to G. W. Hall on his Mention in Sir Douglas Haig’s last despatch, and also to J. Allee on his mention in General Allenby’s.

John Cannon has been transferred from the A.S.C. to the 1st Somerset Light Infantry, and is now in the trenches.

The Newburian (magazine of St Bartholomew’s School, Newbury), July 1918 (N/D161/1/8)

“The many bigamous marriages which have been contracted”

Many soldiers got married while on leave. Shockingly, we discover some of them were not actually free to marry…

My Dear Friends,

We have nearly reached the fourth anniversary of the war: The end is not yet in sight, but there are great reasons for hope, and we have very much to be thankful for. June and July were to have been two of the months in which we were told to expect the greatest scarcity of food, but the supply has been increased rather than diminished, and as regards to the war itself, our anxieties are certainly less than they were a month or two ago. Let us remember to keep August 4th as a special day of prayer and thanksgiving. We shall have a better opportunity of doing so as this time it falls on a Sunday.

I should like to call particular attention to the notice in the Bishop’s Message with regard to the “Marriage of Soldiers from Colonies and Dominions.” Men often require to be married quickly on short leave, and hitherto I have been able to marry them, provided that they have known each other for a considerable time, and that the parents of the intended bride have made enquires and satisfied themselves that all was right.

Henceforward, however, I can neither grant a licence to or marry any man from the Colonies or Dominions unless I have received the certificate of the officer in charge of military records. I am sorry to say that this order on the part of the authorities is due to the many bigamous marriages which have been contracted. A short while ago I heard of an officer forbidding five sets of Banns in one Church at one time because the men were all married.

It has been certain for some time that such protection was needed and the rule is an excellent one, but it will inevitably cause delay and disappointment. The best plan will be for any man, whether at home or abroad, who thinks there is a chance of his getting leave and being married within three months (during which period Licences and Banns are available) to write to me stating his native country, and also his rank, regiment and number, so that the certificate may be obtained, in which case no delay need take place.

Your friend and Vicar,

W.W. Fowler

Marriages of Soldiers from Colonies and Dominions.

It is my duty to call attention to a notice issued by authority as follows:

It is necessary to make sure that there is no matrimonial impediment to the marriage in England and Whales of men of all ranks serving in the Overseas Contingents. Every Clergyman therefore who is asked to publish the banns of marriage of such a bridegroom, whether Officer, Warrant Officer, No-Commissioned Officer, or Man, is requested to explain to the parties that before doing so he must receive the Certificate of the Officer in Charge of Military Records.

Australia
Officer in Charge of Records.
Telephone No. Victoria 8860.
Australian Army Headquarters,
130, Horseferry Road, S.W.1.

Canada
Officer in Charge of Records.
Telephone No. City 2691
Canadian Record Office
Green Arbour House, Old Bailey, E.C.

Newfoundland
Chief paymaster and Officer in Charge of Records.
Telephone No. Victoria147.
Newfoundland Army Contingent,
58, Victoria Street, S.W.1.

New Zealand
Officer in charge of Records
Telephone No. Museum 3360.
New Zealand Army Headquarters,
Southampton Row, W.C.1.

South Africa
Officer in Charge of Records
Telephone No. Victoria 4911.
South African Army Record Office,
65, Victoria Street, S.W.1.

Written on official paper stating the marital condition of the bridegroom as entered in the records. It is recognized that delay will be caused to those who wish to be married quickly. The certificate should be preserved.

This notice is issued in conjunction with the Military Authorities who are prepared to assist in this matter as and when the occasions arise. Similar instructions are being given to the Diocesan registrar with reference to the issue of marriage licences on behalf of such men.


List of Men Serving in His Majesty’s Forces

The following additional names have been added to our prayer list: Robert Whitworth, Albert Hannay, Freeman Holland.

In addition we commend the following to our prayers :

Died of Wounds or Illness: Edward Broad, Charles Cripps.

Wounded: Fred Brooker, Richard Embery.

Prisoner: Arthur Hosler.

Missing: Alfred Levens.


Earley St Peter parish magazine, July 1918 (D/P191/28A/25)

“It is incredible the difficulty of getting food here” – are piglets the answer?

One way around savage food restrictions was to buy your own piglet, and fatten it up on table scraps. Florence Image (nee Spencer) was inspired.

29 Barton Road
15 April ‘18
Beloved Signor

The Signora’s ambitious soul now requires Pigs! She learns that ownership of the unclean animal will entitle you to his entire carcase – (at all events, my lord R[hondda] is said to have granted so much to your first pig. She is full of hope and daring, has already purchased 2 little beasts, one white and one black. I, who am of soberer anticipation, went one day to see them – 10 weeks old. How horrible to feed and pamper creatures, not for their good but for their early death! Callous man!

She is just now in from a cycle flurry, thro’ howling wind and drenching rain, to Comberton, 5 miles off – in search of wood for the finish off of her stye for these two little beasts. It appears that the Meddlesome Food Tyrant demands permission and tickets for any member of the Middle or Upper Classes who wants to buy such a commodity as wood – unless it be old tarred wood. She rode first to Barton, where she had no success, but was directed to Comberton 2 miles further away. Her purchase is promised for delivery tomorrow. We won’t boast till it has actually arrived. But it really was a spirited expedition on a day like this.

It is incredible the difficulty of getting food here. We are fresh from a week of it in this house. Two of Florrie’s brothers, hurriedly recalled to the front, have successively been staying here to say goodbye – sickly that! (The most affectionate letter came here from the Colonel of one: he wrote like a father to his son. And another letter to the other brother from his Brigadier, equally flattering. Alas, since that was written, the whole brigade staff has been wiped out, except the Brig.-General himself, who is recommended for the VC.).

Then there was a cousin and godchild of my own – and my sister is staying with us. Finally a friend and his wife from next door – a Fellow of Caius, going out as Botany Professor to Capetown – when their house, No. 31, was gutted of all furniture, spent 4 days with us…

Well, we have 4 one-and-threepenny cards, per week, for meat. You may guess how thorny our task to feed these numbers. Fish we could get, tho’ not good, but, for meat, we had to bow our pride and accept help from our guests…

With our love to you both.

Affec.
Bild

Letter from John Maxwell Image, Cambridge don, to W F Smith (D/EX801/2)

None the worse for two years as a prisoner of war

We get a glimpse into wartime in a peaceful art of British-occupied Africa (now part of Tanzania). The Ruvuma River forms the bundary between Tanzania and Mozambique, which was in 1918 still a Portugese colony.

1-3-18. Massassie.
R.A.M.C
29th M.A Convoy
British East Africa

Dear Sir,

It is not some time since I wrote to you last, but trust you received my letter in answer to your most welcome letter of 6-8-17. Since writing to you last I have travelled the greater part of this country, the South of Central Railway, I have been over the Ruvoma river into Portuguese territory, but am now back in East Africa.

During the last few months I have had rather a busy time, and have also had my share of illness. I am picking up quickly again now, and feel as full of life as ever. The weather is still very hot. We have had very little rain this season so far: this time last year we were having very heavy rains and were stranded in the swamp for quite a month at a time.

I expect to be going on leave to South Africa some time this month; there are only 5 of us left out of 22 who left England 2 years ago, so I think we shall stand a chance of leave this rainy season.

There is very little game in this part of she country but about 50 miles from here, near the Border almost everything can be seen.

Football is the great game at present as the evenings are very cool now. Our Unit has started a Weekly Paper which is a great success throughout the camp, it is called the “Masassi Times”. If possible I will send you a copy which I am sure you will find very interesting, in fact we can boast the wit of two famous brother Comedians. We are having a very busy time just at present, for the sick average is very high again now, 3-3-18.

It is now Sunday afternoon, tonight we have another service which will be taken by the Rev. Archdeacon Hallet in a Banda at our park. I have had several talks with him, he tells me he has preached at Sunningdale and Ascot and remembered our church when I showed him a photo which I received from home a few months ago. He has been a prisoner in the country for 2 years, but he seems none the worse for his experience, for he is now back at the same Mission as before the war, which is only 4 miles from our camp. The Mission has been used for a hospital by both the Germans and ourselves, but is now given over for its work to be carried on.

It is a lovely building built of stone and brick by the natives, it is built on a hill only a few yards from a great rock several hundred feet high. Looking from a distance the rock appears to overhang the Mission. We have one of these great rocks on all four sides of us, with just a road running between, which is called Bhna. Some of the greatest fights of the campaign took place here, which makes it very historical.

We had a Native Regimental Band here for 2 nights last week, which we all enjoyed being the first we had seen or heard since landing in the country. The natives are very busy with their crops now, most of the land being very fertile, we are able to grow almost anything in the garden we’ve made, but our great trouble is to get the seed. Shops of any description are unheard of in this country so you can imagine our solitude. I think it will appear very strange but pleasant to us all when we get down to South Africa on leave.

I am so pleased to hear that Mrs. Cornish and Miss Mirriam are enjoying good health, please convey my best wishes to everyone at the vicarage. I will now conclude, thanking you for your kindness and trusting you are in the best of health,

Yours sincerely,

W. R. Lewis.

Sunningdale parish magazine, July 1918 (D/P150B/28A/10)

Fallen in German East Africa

This tablet included Mrs Collins’s son, fallen in German East Africa in 1916.

5 February 1918

The Chairman informed the meeting that the Memorial Tablet to be erected to the memory of the late Mrs Collins had arrived from S Africa & was in his custody…

It was decided not to renew the insurance against hostile aircraft.

Wesley Methodist Church, Reading: trustees’ minutes (D/MS60/1A/1)

“We earnestly pray that our friend may be kept from all harm in the difficult and dangerous work in which he is engaged”

A former member of Broad Street Congregational Church had been reported killed, but there was better news from local hero Victor Smith.

We extend our sympathy, too, to the relatives of the late Sergeant A Middlemost, of the South African Contingent. Before emigrating to South Africa, Sergeant Middlemost was an active member of the Young Men’s Institute. In the early days of the war he joined up with the South African forces, and he has now paid the supreme sacrifice for his country. Those who knew him will ever cherish his memory with affection.

The many friends of Captain L. Victor Smith, MC, have been greatly pleased to hear of his recent promotion, and they would unite in heartiest congratulations to him and his parents – our esteemed friends Mr and Mrs Chas Steward Smith – and in good wishes for the future. Captain Smith is the first of our Broad Street representatives to win his captaincy in the present war, and he has done it in a remarkably short time. It is not long since we were rejoicing in the MC which he had won for conspicuous bravery, and now comes this further cause for gratification. We earnestly pray that our friend may be kept from all harm in the difficult and dangerous work in which he is engaged.

The way in which our schoolrooms are crowded each afternoon by wounded soldiers, and each evening by other men and women in khaki, gives ample proof of the need for such work as is now being efficiently done by the church. I [the minister] should like to thank the many ladies and gentlemen who have so readily come to our assistance in this matter. They need no assurance from me that it is abundantly worth while.

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, November 1917 (D/N11/12/1/14)

“The attempt of our enemies to starve us has practically failed”

In Earley people were grateful for good weather, which looked set to relieve the pressure on the food supply.

The Vicar’s Letter

My dear friends

Autumn is drawing on apace, and we have again reached the time for our Harvest Thanksgiving, which is fixed for Sunday, October 7th.

This year we ought to be especially thankful. At one time our outlook as regards food appeared to be far from satisfactory, but God has blessed us during the past month with such weather that in most districts the greater part of the harvest has been gathered in without much damage, and the attempt of our enemies to starve us by unrestricted submarine warfare, though still serious, has practically failed. Surely we ought to join together in our thanksgivings, and especially at Holy Communion, with a deepened sense of what we owe to God for our nation and for ourselves.

And while we are thanking God for our material harvest, let us all think of those fields which are ripe for the spiritual harvest in India, Canada, South Africa, and throughout the world… Do we realise as we ought the enormous responsibility that will rest upon our country after the war for the spiritual harvest of the world?

Your friend and Vicar
W W Fowler.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, October 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

Hastening to rejoin her fallen son

Wesley Methodist Church in Queen’s Road, Reading, considered a request to put up a memorial in the church to a fallen soldier, whose family had worshipped there before emigrating to South Africa. Sadly the young man’s grieving mother had died 10 days after he was killed.

14 May 1917
Brass Memorial Tablet, Mrs Collins

A letter was read from Mr Moon containing extracts from a letter received from Mr E F Collins of South Africa, giving the information asked for as to the suggested lettering on the Memorial tablet he wished to be placed in Wesley Church.

The particulars given were as follows:

The size of tablet to be 3 ft by 2 1/3.

Inscription of Tablet: To the memory of Sarah Ann Collins, who hastening to rejoin her son left the Church Militant for the Church Triumphant on March 20th 1916. Also to the memory of Douglas Collins of the 7th SAI who fell in action on the night of March 11-12 1916 at Reala Lakma, East Africa.

The design of the Tablet ‘Gothic’.

[Resolved] That the Trustees accept the Tablet & will decide the placing of it on its arrival.

Wesley Methodist Church, Reading: trustees’ minutes (D/MS60/1A/1)

A talkative young man from the Royal Flying Corps

The latest from Florence Vansittart Neale:

13 October 1916
Had wire Mr Lowndes (South Africa) coming for Sunday. I began M[others’] Meeting – am taking it this year. Little talk after, in lower room – paralysing! Found young man arrived. Very talkative, only 19, in RFC.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/8)

That dread word “missing”

Broad Street Church in Reading continued to care about its men who had gone to war.

November 1915

We desire also to express our sympathy with the relatives and friends of our brother, Trooper G P Lewis, of the Royal Berks Yeomanry. Mr Lewis has been a member of our church for some years. He was one of the first to respond to the call of his country in August 1914. He has been reported “missing” in the Dardanelles, for some weeks. We can imagine what that dread word “missing” means to his loved ones, and we tender them our affectionate sympathy.

News reached Reading a few days ago that Private Reginald S Woolley, son of our friends Mr and Mrs W A Woolley, 85 Oxford Road, had been seriously wounded “somewhere in France”. It is a pleasure to be able to report that our young friend is now making good progress towards recovery, and hopes before long to be home on sick leave. We congratulate his parents upon this relief from their anxiety, and we hope that their natural desire to have their son home may soon be realised.

The call for recruits for the army and navy is sadly depleting our ranks in the Sunday School, and there is the possibility of further loss in the near future…

Talking of recruits reminds me that eight more names have been added to the church section of our Roll of Honour.
(more…)

“Butcher’s meat has to go”

Two more Cranbourne men had fallen in the war, while others had followed them to the front. Meanwhile those left behind were sending eggs for the wounded, and taking the advice of an almost certainly fictional letter in the church magazine to save food and money.

We have to record, with much regret, the deaths of Sergeant Tom Hillyer, and Private James Andrews.

Sergeant Hillyer was killed in action in April. He was well known in the Parish as a Postman and as the winner of several prizes for walking at the Sports of the Windsor Forest Athletic Club. When the war began he at once enlisted in the Canadian contingent and was very soon promoted to be sergeant. He had seen service in the Egyptian campaigns and in the South African War, and held four medals.

James Andrews was gardener at Springhill and being reservist had to join his regiment at once. After eight months fighting he was seriously wounded and died of his wounds early in May. He was a much respected member of our branch of the C.E.M.S. and a regular communicant. Memorial services were held in our Church for both of these soldiers who died for their King and Country.

The following names are to be added to the list (published last month) of those who are serving in His Majesty’s forces.

Charles Goodchild, Suffolk Regiment.
Charles Peters, Lance-Corporal, Mechanical Transport.
Ernest Hawthorne, Royal Engineers.
Arthur Robert Hatcher, Royal Engineers.
Frank Edmonds, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry.
Albert John Edmonds, Berkshire Yeomanry.

Several in this Parish are contributing to the egg collection which is being made all over the country for our wounded soldiers. Miss K. Meyer is the local Secretary and takes the gifts each week to Windsor, where they are packed and sent to headquarters in London, from which place they are sent to our hospitals in England and France. Since April 30th, 1485 eggs have been given by residents in Cranbourne and Winkfield, but during the last month the number sent each week has been getting less. The Secretary wishes it to be known that even one egg a week, or one a fortnight will be gratefully received, for “every mickle makes a muckle.” She would be glad to receive the eggs on Thursdays, as she takes them to Windsor every Friday.

We have seen an interesting letter and as it seemed to contain some most valuable information, we have persuaded the writer to let us publish it in our Magazine. It is too long to print the whole of it in this month’s issue and so it will be “continued in our next.”-

MRS. SMITH TO MRS. ROBINSON.

“DEAR MRS. ROBINSON,”

This comes hoping you are well, as it leaves me at present, but terribly worried over this cruel war. It’s hard enough to get on now that work is plenty. What will it be when the war is over and hundreds of thousands of soldiers come back to work and take the situations which are being kept open for them. And the bill there will be to pay. The Parliament is spending 3 millions of pounds every day on the war, and you don’t suppose they are finding the money in their cellars where Guy Faux was hid. No, my husband says they are running up a big debt, and who do you suppose will pay it, he says. Why, he says, it is us the working people will have to pay it, at least it will come hardest on us. So those who are making a little more just now (which is not you or me) should be saving every penny beyond their bare living, and not fancying themselves rich.

It is a mercy I learned to make the most of things, and I may mention some of the things I am doing now. First of all, butcher’s meat has to go. No bits of steak and one-and-five per lb. Even the gentry are not buying such a lot of butcher’s meat just now, so that there may be more to go round for the poorer classes. Any meat I can buy must not be choice parts. If it is nicely stewed any part can be made good, especially just now, with vegetables not so hard to get. Onions one must have. They are most wholesome and they make anything go down. Brown a bit of onion in a saucepan with a bit of dripping and a good dust of flour. When it is all brown, add a little water and stir till it boils, and makes a thin sauce. Drop in the meat and a tea spoon of vinegar, also a little pepper. Cook it slowly till the meat is soft. You can keep putting in any bits of vegetables, also potato. When you dish it up, you get back everything you have put in- no waste. Of course the pot must be filled up with more water if the meat is getting too dry.

As for potatoes, I should feel ashamed of myself if I was to peel them. The Irish, who know what potatoes are, think the skin of a baked potato the best part. Any way, if boiled in their skins you get much more flavour, and can strip off the skins as you eat them. Peeling them in the old way wastes one pound in every four pounds. It is wise to buy what potatoes you can, as they are good food, except for babies, and make other things go further. If I ever run to a rasher, I fry some cold potato with it, as a saving, and as for ‘sausages and mashed,’ the potato is half the battle.

Sausages are a help just now. Put them in a pie dish and over them a batter made with flour, milk, and water, and one egg, and they go a long way as ‘toad in the hole’; or put them in the dish, covered with potatoes and bake like a pie. If only plainly fried they are too dear. Fish, when you can get it, will save the meat. Plaice, haddock, cod or hake can be made quite tasty. Put on a tin, and sprinkle with vinegar, pepper and salt; cover it with a bit of clean paper and put a bit of dripping round. Bake it till it is ready to leave the bone. Baste it through the paper whenever you have time. Serve it with the liquor which runs out, which is quite tasty.”

Cranbourne section of Winkfield District Magazine, July 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/5)

“The last job they would ever need done for them”

An Ascot man serving with the Canadians shared some of his bleaker experiences, including the burial of dead comrades.

THE MILITARY HOSPITAL at the Grand Stand re-opens this month.

THE WAR.

Gunner George Cannon, son of Mr. and Mrs. Cannon of Swinley was drowned off the Dardanelles on April 17th, when the Transport Maniton went down. Captain Denison, Commander of his Battery, writes to us:-

“I am very sorry to lose Gunner Cannon, as he was a first class man and an excellent soldier … The Battery is doing well: but I am afraid that will not make good the loss to his own people.”

He was an excellent young man: and our most true sympathy goes out to his parents. RIP.

Mr. W. Francis, our much respected parishioner, of London Road, Ascot, has received a letter from the King, in which his Majesty writes in terms of warm appreciation of Mr. Francis’ four sons and one son-in-law in the army. One of these sons died of wounds in South Africa early in the war.

“If GOD is for us, who can be against us? If GOD is not for us, all our munitions, all the heroism of our men, will not avail to secure the victory. It may not yet be patent to all, but it is undoubtedly true, that at this moment the whole fate of our Empire depends upon this – whether we have among us, in the Churches or outside, enough spiritual might, spiritual power, spiritual decision, to grasp firmly the Unseen, and to use the forces that GOD holds out to those who put their trust in Him.” (R.F. HORTON)

THE FOLLOWING EXTRACTS from one of the heroic Canadian Contingent (and Ascot parishioner) will be read with interest:-

“You will see by the papers how the Canadians have done, and the men we have lost. We ourselves took 2 lines of trenches from the Germans last week. But we lost a good many men, and then we had to stay there and hold them under fire all the time, until we were relieved by the Gordon Highlanders. I saw my old lot that morning, the 5th Battalion. They have lost all but 6 officers: and there are only 97 of the old men left who went out to France with me… They will have to give us more men to make us up to strength, or we shall soon be all wiped out. But these must do the best they can: that is what we are here for. The Tommies call us the “mad Canadians.” …

I was in one of the German trenches last week and there were a good many bodies lying about, so some of us volunteered to go out and bury them. I went, and the first body I went up to was one of the Scots Guards. He had been dead for 5 days. I took his card off, and buried him as well as I could, and marked his grave up with a Cross. I shall report him to his regiment. Then we set to work, and buried at least 40 more, Guards, Welsh, Warwicks and Germans. Poor fellows, they had been lying there for a week. It was the last job they would ever need done for them.”

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine, July 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/5)

The greatest naval war the world has ever witnessed

The Dodeka Club rejoiced in the successes of the Royal Navy since the start of the war.

Friday March 5th

Johnson opening the discussion of the evening with a paper on “What the British Navy had done”. He stated that the greatest naval war which the world had ever witnessed has been in progress nearly seven months. It had been marked by no engagement of first class importance, there had been no battle in which battleships of the latest types have been opposed to one another.

Nevertheless the British Fleet, not alone in one sea, but in every sea, had achieved a series of victories of great importance. Reviewing the course of events in broad outline, he summarised what the British Navy had achieved since August 4th 1914.

1. The High Sea Fleet of Germany had been contained in its home ports without respite, not a single German battle squadron had been at sea.
2. Five & a half million tons of German & a million tons of Austro-Hungarian shipping had been driven off the seas or captured.
3. The overseas trade of Germany & Austria had been strangled.
4. The German colonial Empire had been almost entirely destroyed.
Then. Too, at the outbreak of war there were at least – at the lowest estimate – one million Germans & Austrians of military age, resident in foreign countries who were prevented from crossing the seas to fight against us.

By way of contrast Johnson went on to show
1. That British shipping had been as active in war time as in peace, & had suffered but very little loss.
2. British overseas trade, except with the enemy, had been maintained.
3. Not a single British dominion, colony or dependency had been invaded, the German incursion into South Africa excepted.
4. Forty-five millions of inhabitants of the United Kingdom have been amply fed day-by-day & all owing to the Navy, which shows that our sailors are more than maintaining the splendid traditions of the past, & their skill and heroism leave nothing to be desired, and all honour to them.

It was getting towards the bewitching hour of midnight before the meeting broke up.

Dodeka Club minutes (D/EX2160/1/3)

The unselfish patriotism of Ascot men

The parishioners of All Saints, Ascot, wanted to make sure all their soldiers and sailors were recorded on a special board in the church. One had already paid the ultimate price.

ROLL OF HONOUR.
We deeply sympathise with Mr. and Mrs. Francis on the loss of their eldest son, William Francis, who died in hospital of wounds received in the South Africa campaign. We reserve saying more until fuller details have come to head.

NAVY AND ARMY LIST of those who have gone forth from All Saints parish to serve in connection with the War. A full list is in formation. It will be framed, and fixed in the Church, as Memorial of those Ascot people who ventured so much, in their unselfish patriotism, for their country. We shall require a full and correct statement of their separate ships and regiments, or of their particular work in connection with the War. Will you kindly fill in, at once, the needed information after their names on the paper placed for that purpose on the table by the Font, in the Church?

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine, February 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/2)

Remember the brave and true, and give them rest

Bracknell mourned the loss of several of its soldiers, and the serious injury of others.

THE WAR
THE ROLL OF HONOUR.

The following prayer from a Russian Liturgy will be valued by many at this time.

“Remember all those, the brave and true, who have died at the death of honour and are departed in the hope of resurrection to eternal Life. In that place of light, whence sorrow and mourning are far banished, give them rest O Lord, the Lover of man. Grant this O Lord.”

* * *
Lieut. William A. P. Foster, the elder son of Sir William and Lady Foster, has died of wounds received in action at Frankfurt in Germany. He was in the South Staffordshire Regiment and came back from South Africa in September and went out on the 4th of October to join the Army on Active Service. After three or four weeks of strenuous service he was wounded on October 31st and fell into the hands of the enemy, and now the sad news has come that he died of his wounds in November 11th. Since he joined the Army he has served mostly abroad, but we have seen him from time to time when he has been home at Priestwood House, and he was greatly loved, not only by his fellow soldiers, but by all who knew him.

Another of our Bracknell men has fallen, Frederick Butler. He rejoined the Army at the beginning of the war; he had served in the South African war and had two medals. The news of his death reached Bracknell on November 16th but he was killed on October 21st.

We also deeply regret the loss of Sub-Lieut. Charles Van Neck, the youngest son of Mrs. Van Neck, late of Lily Hill. He was a most promising young officer and fell on October 24th. Mrs Van Neck’s eldest son is also amongst the “missing.”

Amongst the wounded form this Parish are Lieut. Warren Mackenzie, who we are glad to say is reported to be doing well; he is at present in hospital in France. George Clarke, who is in the Reading hospital. Harry Hollingsworth, who some weeks ago was reported to be wounded, but of whom no further news has yet come through. H. Downham, who has been in hospital in Newcastle. Henry Barlow, who is at Chatham. Harry Matthews, who is in France, and according to his own account, “going on grand.” Another young soldier, Harry Loader, whose family lived until lately here, is also reported to be wounded; he is in the hospital at Dewsbury.

Mrs. Alfred Isaacs, whose husband was reported to be missing weeks ago, has now received a letter from him telling her that he has been wounded and captured; he has now recovered from his wounds and is a prisoner in Germany.

Lieut. Norman Johnston who was slightly wounded has come home. William Notley is also at home minus a finger, and Arthur Richardson is wounded and in France.

FOREIGN MISSIONS.
There is to be a Sale of Work (consisting of useful articles for Sailors, Soldiers, Refugees and Children) at the Parish Room at the Vicarage on Tuesday, December 6th, from 2.30 to 6 p.m., the proceeds of which will be given to Missions.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Magazine, December 1914 (D/P151/28A/6/12)