Certificate for vegetables

January 23rd 1919

Received certificate signed by Sir David Beatty, from the Fleet, as an appreciation of the vegetables sent by the school children.

Hinton Waldrist C of E School log book (C/EL84/2, p. 168)

Advertisements

“They all bring the same report of ill treatment, suffering and semi-starvation, which makes the blood boil and raises the strong desire that a stern reckoning should be paid for such brutality”

Released PoWs had a tale to tell.

We rejoice to welcome home in time for Xmas, four of our Prisoners of War, C. Brant, W. Harwood, R. Mitchell, and F. Onion. They all bring the same report of ill treatment, suffering and semi-starvation, which makes the blood boil and raises the strong desire that a stern reckoning should be paid for such brutality.

We shall naturally wish to erect a parish memorial to those Winkfield men who have given their lives for their country in this War, and as this concerns all in the parish, it is proposed shortly to call a Public Meeting in the Parish Room, to discuss plans and particulars. Probably the meeting will be held towards the end of January, and due notice of it will be given.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, January 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11)

“As he had been demobilised, he would be glad to resume his appointment”

When soldiers got their old jobs back, that often meant someone else was displaced.

22nd January 1919

Frederick Hooper, the former Handyman & Engineer, appeared before the Board and stated that as he had been demobilised, he would be glad to resume his appointment in a month’s time at the workhouse if the terms of wages were arranged.

It was decided to pay Hooper £1.17.0 a week wages and 5/- a week War Bonus, and that notice be given Thomas Jessett, the present Handyman, to terminate his appointment in a month’s time.

Hungerford and Ramsbury Board of Guardians minutes (G/H1/40)

Westminster Chimes in the Tower or a Calvary or Crucifix in the Churchyard?

Newbury began to consider its war memorial.

A Meeting of Parishioners was held at the Parish Room on January 22nd to consider the question of a War Memorial to the memory of those fallen in the War. There was a fair attendance, though more might have been there. Various suggestions were brought forward and considerable discussion took place. Finally, it was decided to consider the putting of a Memorial of some kind in the Church to contain the names of the men; the putting of the Westminster Chimes in the Tower; and the erection of a Calvary or Crucifix in the Churchyard. For this a Committee was appointed, consisting of the following: the Rector and Churchwardens, The Mayor, Mr C Hawker, Mr G W Roberts, Mr D Geater, The Mayoress, Mrs L R Majendie, Mrs H E Pratt, Miss Godding, Miss Plows, Miss K Harrison, Miss L H Barnes, amd Miss P Belcher, with power to add to their number.

Newbury parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P89/28A/14)

A collection for the King’s Fund for the Disabled

Jan. 21

We made a collection for the King’s Fund for the Disabled and I am sending £1.1.0 as the result.

St Mary’s CE School, Speenhamland (C/EL119/3)

War bonus for workhouse staff

21 January 1919

War bonus

Relieving Officers On considering their application on according to notice it was resolved that the following bonuses be allowed in respect of the period from 1st July to 31st Dec: last to Mr Rawlins £23.18/. to Mr Bland £10.18/. and to Mr Drafter £17.8/.

Newbury Board of Guardians minutes (G/N1/39, p. 126)

A bronze plaque with appropriate figures in relief

Plans were underway for a war memorial in Stratfield Mortimer.

War Memorial

The Committee appointed on November 19th have got to work, and have agreed to recommend to the adjourned public meeting:

(1) that the Memorial take the form of a cross; (2) that the cross should have on one side a bronze plaque with appropriate figures in relief, and an inscription; (3) that names be in bronze in relief on the other three sides; (4) that not less than £500 would be required for a worthy Memorial.

One scale model has already been submitted to the Committee, but they are asking for other designs also before making their report. Over £60 has already been received, and further donations will be welcomed at any time by the Hon. Sec. Miss Phelp, Wisley, Padworth Road.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, January 1919 (D/P120/28A/14)

Closed for influenza

Influenza continued to affect the county.

20th January 1919

School closed for influenza until March 3rd.

Goosey CE School log book (C/EL89/1, p. 171)

An application for the job of Porter

An ex-soldier applied for a job at the workhouse. The Porter would have been more of a doorman than someone to carry things.

20th January 1919

The clerk reported that Private J. L. Green had recently died from pneumonia and an application had been received for the post of Porter from Private H. A. Olliffe 1/4 Royal Berks Regiment, Italian Expeditionary Force. The matter was discussed and in view of the retirement of the Master and the appointment of a new Master at an early date it was resolved to defer for the present taking any action by way of appointing such an officer.

Minutes of Abingdon Board of Guardians (G/A1/33)

“The war is likely to be the most striking event of the 20th century”

Newbury Museum planned to remember the war and its impact.

Museum and Free Library Committee
Monday, January 19th, 1919


The Hon. Curator laid before the Committee the following report for the past quarter:

Borough of Newbury Museum

Typical Collection.

The war is likely to be the most striking event of the 20th century, and we shall probably not be wrong in devoting the 1 foot 6 inches of wall space allotted to the century almost, if not entirely, to war exhibits. In the table-case there should be nine small but choice objects illustrating the following regions: Britain; North Europe; the campaign in the Murmansk Region; Central Europe; Germany or Austria; Italy; The Balkan Peninsula; Gallipoli; Serbia or Salonika; Egypt; Western Asia; Palestine or Mesopotamia; India; Japan. These objects must be small, as the space at our disposal is very limited, but should be choice. An instructional sectional Mill’s No 5 hand-grenade, an iron cross, and a Turkish cannon-ball, and such-like objects, would be most suitable. Besides these we might exhibit a German shrapnel-helmet, a British gas mask, and a French 75 mm shell-case.

Local Collections

These might be placed in a special case to illustrate the effect of the war on Newbury, and the share in it taken by the Borough and neighbourhood. It would be interesting to collect a complete series of posters, circulars and notices issued by the Police, the County Council, the Borough Council, and the Rural District Council, and by officials and committees acting under their authority; also a complete set of the issue of the “Newbury Weekly News” from the declaration of war to the conclusion of the peace celebrations. These cannot be displayed upon the walls of the Museum owing to lack of space, and the Museum possesses no accommodation for storing them in such a way as to be accessible to students. Perhaps this part of the record could be undertaken by the Free Library.

The special Museum case might, however, contain: Badges of officers and men of the Berkshire regiments; badges and insignia of Newbury Special Constables; badges and arms of the Newbury Volunteers; shell-cases made by Newbury munition firms. These seem to be all that we shall find room for, and ought to be sufficient to show posterity how the war affected Newbury and its neighbourhood.

War Collection – the following special report by the Hon. Curator on a war collection was held before the Committee.:-

Report on War Collections

Now that hostilities have ceased, it is time that the Committee decided what steps should be taken by the Museum to put on record the chief features of the war. In considering this question it will be well to give the matter careful thought, and to make sure that it is approached with due regard to proportion. On the one hand we must avoid concluding that, as the war is an affair of yesterday, it should not be represented in our Historical Collections, still more is it well to remember that, though at the present moment it seems to overshadow in importance all other events, yet it must not occupy an undue amount of space in our cases, but must take its place with other events of a perhaps less dramatic nature. There are two ways in which the war may be considered part of the Museum: one as part of the general history of the Old World, as exhibited on our typical collection; and the other as part of the history of Newbury, as exemplified by our Local Collections.

The Hon. Curator’s report was adopted and efforts were to be made to secure suitable exhibits.


Newbury Borough Council minutes (N/AC1/2/9)

Uncertain whether any part of the properties are suitable for land settlement

It was hard to find land to offer to ex-servicemen hoping to go into farming.

Report of Small Holdings and Allotment Committee to BCC, 18 January 1919

FARINGDON

Land belonging to Oriel College

Correspondence, which has passed between the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries and Oriel College with reference to an offer by the latter of land for the settlement of ex-servicemen, has resulted in the College sending to the Board a schedule of their lands in various counties. In the correspondence the Treasurer of the College reminds the Board that in addition to the reluctance that the College naturally feel in disturbing the tenants of lands held under them, they would make themselves liable to claims for compensation should they seek to render their land available for the purpose. In the circumstances they suggest the Board should address the leading farmers on the subject in order that they may voluntarily relinquish land for the purpose. The Treasurer states that the College have no unoccupied lands in hand, and are uncertain whether any part of the properties are suitable for land settlement.

The Board request that the property in the county should be inspected to ascertain whether it would be suitable for the purpose.

The College Authorities have been asked to send a detailed schedule and a plan of each farm to facilitate this.

HUNGERFORD

Port Down and Freeman’s Marsh

It has been suggested to the Committee that the above property might be acquired for land settlement.

The land is stated to be part of the endowment of the Town and Manor Charity at Hungerford, to be about 350 acres in extent, but to be subject to certain common rights.

The Clerk to the Charity has been communicated with; he states he will bring the matter before the trustees at their next meeting….

LONG WITTENHAM

St John’s College land

The Board of Agriculture and Fisheries asked the Council to report on the Manor Farm, Long Wittenham, which had been put forward for the settlement of ex-service men.

After considering a report by the Land Steward, the Board have requested the Council to consider the advisability of negotiating for the acquisition of the property.

The Committee also considered the report, and asked the Sub-committee to enter into negotiations.

Report of Small Holdings and Allotment Committee to Berkshire County Council, 18 January 1919, in BCC minutes (C/CL/C1/1/22)

During demobilization the need of education in the Army would be greatly increased

Schools were still not back to normal.

Report of School Management Sub-committee, 18 January 1919

TEACHERS AND DEMOBILIZATION

The Board of Education have asked to be supplied with particulars as to the teachers in the County on Military Service, and state they will endeavour to secure their early release.

A subsequent letter, however, states that during demobilization the need of education in the Army would be greatly increased, and that it was now proposed that teachers now serving in the Army, if they so desire, might be re-enlisted for a period of one year after the cessation of hostilities. The Board of Education invite Authorities to consider how they can co-operate by holding open for teachers who re-engage the posts which now await them on their return.

The Sub-committee have pointed out to the Board of Education the difficulty experienced at the present time in carrying on owing to the number of Head Teachers on military service, and have urged on them the desirability of securing the release of these teachers as soon as possible. With this reservation, the Sub-committee recommend the [Education] Committee to accede to the request…

Report of Works Sub-committee of Education Committee, 18 January 1919

TEMPORARY BUILDINGS

The Board of Education have forwarded particulars of various types of temporary war buildings which might be suitable for use as temporary school buildings, and suggested that the Committee should communicate with the Secretary of the Lands and Buildings Reconstruction Committee, and ask to be informed when any of the buildings were coming up for disposal.

The Sub-committee have asked to be informed where any of these buildings can be seen.

Report of Bylaws and Attendance Sub-committee, 18 January 1919

SCHOOL MEDICAL SERVICE

Dr A Richmond has taken over the work of Acting School Medical Officer as from 1 January in place of Dr W Sisam.

The Sub-committee recommend that the Education Committee do place on record their appreciation of the work of Dr Sisam, show has during the last four years given his services as Acting School medical Officer without payment, in the absence of Dr G C Taylor on Military Service….

EPIDEMIC OF INFLUENZA

In November and December, the epidemic of influenza spread through the county and, with few exceptions, the schools were closed for periods of from a fortnight to six weeks on the advice of the Acting School Medical Officer. The percentage of attendance during the time the various schools were open was low, being in November 79 per cent….

Report of School Management Sub-committee, Berkshire County Council minutes (C/CL/C1/1/22)

A beautiful war memorial

Cookham Dean settled on a design for its war memorial.

The Vicar’s Letter

It is some time since any mention has been made in The Magazine of the proposed War Memorial, but Meetings of the Committee have been held from time to time, and Mr. Eden, the architect , who is the great Authority on Wayside Crosses, has submitted a design which, with one or two slight alterations, was approved by the Committee at a Meeting held at the Vicarage on Saturday, January 18th. Mr Eden has been asked to produce an estimate of the cost of erection, and as soon as this has been received the design and all matters connected with it will be submitted to a Meeting of the Subscribers, of which due notice will be given.

The design is undoubtedly a beautiful one, and arrangements are being made to enable me to enclose a lithograph of it in each copy of next month’s Magazine. The site chosen by vote of the subscribers is the triangle to the S.W. of the Green, close to the spot on which the King George V. Coronation Tree was planted. Mr. Eden visited the spot, and his design has been executed with careful consideration of the position chosen, and its immediate surroundings. The Treasurer would be glad to receive Subscriptions already promised, and to enrol additional subscribers on his list. Subscriptions should be sent to T. Stretch, Esq., Five Elms, Pope’s Lane, or to Mr. Edwards at Tars Platt, Hon. Secretary.

Cookham Dean parish magazine (D/P43B/28A/11)

A new flag for Peace Day

Braywick
17th January 1919

As the school flag is worn out, we the teachers and scholars, determined to purchase a new one for ‘Peace Day’. So with the managers’ consent a half holiday was granted to-day that we might give a concert, the proceeds of which to buy a flag. Children worked very heartily with their teachers to become proficient in their plays, dances and songs and good results are hoped for.

Speenhamland
Jan 17

Visit of Francis C E Lewis of the RFA, an old boy.


Log books of Braywick CE School (C/EL65/4)
; St Mary’s CE School, Speenhamland (C/EL119/3)

Such very substantial help to our Hospitals

League of Mercy

Miss Brenda Rhodes, a Vice-President of the League, desires to thank the numerous contributors who have subscribed during 1918, and have enabled her to send such very substantial help to our Hospitals. The Flag and Heather Day produced £78 7s. 4d. Annual subscriptions £23 8s. 6d. Total £104 19s. 10d.

Wargrave parish magazine, January 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)