“A rebuilt organ, although it would be a good thankoffering for peace, would not be suitable as a memorial”

How best to recognise the service of the country’s fallen, and those returning alive?

St John’s Parochial Church Council

The fourth meeting of the Parochial Church Council was held at the Princes Street Room on Monday, January 20th, 1919, at 8.15 p.m….

Mr W. H. Pountney moved the following resolution: That the question of providing a new organ for St John’s Church be re-opened by this Council; and a scheme devised forthwith to secure the end in view in memory of those who have fallen in the great war, as a thanksgiving for the blessing of peace, and as a matter of expediency.

This was seconded pro forma by Mr Aldridge.

… This was seconded by Mr Sutton, supported by Miss Sutton, Mr Fanstone, Mr Churchill and Dr Murrell, and Mr F. Winter, several of the speakers saying that whatever was done as a War memorial should be something in connection with both churches, and not for St John’s only. The vicar said he thought the form of memorial should be in accordance with the views of the relations of those who had given their lives, and that a rebuilt organ, although it would be a good thankoffering for peace, would not be suitable as a memorial…

Mr Haslam then moved the following resolution: That a committee be formed to consider the best form for a Memorial to those parishioners or members of the congregations who have given their lives for their God, King and Country in the great war, and to report to this Council.

Mr L. G. Sutton seconded this resolution and it was carried unanimously.

The following committee was elected to carry it into effect: the vicar, the churchwardens, Mr L G Sutton, Mr H A Kingham, Mr F H Wright, Mr Fanstone, Mr Murrell, Miss Britton and Miss Winter.

Mr E C Pearce moved the following resolution, which was seconded by Mr H R Sutton, and carried unanimously:

That a committee be formed to consider and report to the vicar how best to welcome the men and women returning from War Service to the parish, and to take steps to attach them if possible to the parish life.

The following committee was elected to carry this into effect: the vicar, Mr E C Pearce, Mr H R Sutton, Mr W Wing, Mr Fanstone, Miss Simmonds, Miss Rundell, and Cap. Blandy, with power to confer with others.


Reading St. John parish magazine, February 1919 (D/P172/28A/24)

Advertisements

“We hope this most important work of re-construction will appeal to those who have till now given their time up to war work”

Women were invited to join in the work rebuilding the country after the war.

Hare Hatch Women’s Institute

The Women’s Institute was started in August, 1918 and Mrs. Noble agreed to be Hon. Secretary for three months. Twenty-three members have been enrolled, the meetings have been well attended and the members seem to appreciate the advantages offered to them. Lectures have been given by London speakers on Food Production, Children’s Welfare and Fuel Saving. We are asked now to make the land girls living in our midst Honorary Member of the Institute. The Hospitals and Depots will shortly be closed. We hope this most important work of re-construction will appeal to those who have till now given their time up to war work.

More Members are wanted. Will anyone volunteer now, or after their present work is over, and enrol their names as Pioneers in the Re-construction of Village Life.

Will anyone willing to help, kindly send her name to Mrs. Winter, The Vicarage, or to Mrs. Wilson Noble, Hon. Sec., Kingswood, Hare Hatch.

M.C.N.

Wargrave parish magazine, December 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

More names for Newbury Roll of Honour

Four more Newbury men were reported to have been killed.

ROLL OF HONOUR

87 Gunner R P Styles, RFA, killed in action in France, August 22nd, 1918. RIP.
88 Ernest Henry Deacon, Gunner, RFA, died of injuries in Scotland, December 2nd, 1917. RIP.
89 Pioneer Henry Winter, killed in France, 7th August, 1918.
90 Signaller Frederick Beckley, 29th Battery RFA, killed in action Sept. 12th, 1918, aged 20.

Newbury parish magazine, October 1918 (D/P89/28A/13)

“All possible economy must be effected”

The economic cost of the war affected every aspect of life at home.

The Church Accounts, 1917-1918.

Wargrave Vicarage,
April 20th, 1918.

My dear Friends,

We now have the pleasure of publishing the parochial accounts for the year ending at Easter, 1918.

The income for which they account to £623 as against £542 11s. 0d. the increase of subscriptions is partly due to the inclusion of all the Churchyard Accounts of which only part has been included in previous years, but this makes an addition of only £19 12s. 0d., and the remainder is due to increased support. The increased church collections is to some extent attributable to the addition of two Organ Recitals, £20 16s. 6d, but to the very generous response to special appeals, as in the case of the Red Cross, £36 5s. 0d, but the general level of weekly offertories has been distinctly higher and the result is most pleasing.

The increased income is balanced on the expenditure side by additions to salaries and the heavy cost of fuel.

Sir William Cain’s gifts are distributed so widely in the parish that his liberality is known to all and everyone in Wargrave has reason to be grateful for them, they have for instance made the V.A.D. Hospital possible, on its present scale…

A copy of the statement of accounts is to be sent to every subscriber, but no copies are to be included with the parish magazines as in former years, because all possible economy must be effected in printing and paper. The Schedule of Special Offertories will however be inserted in the magazine together with this letter.

I remain faithfully yours,

STEPHEN M. WINTER

Wargrave parish magazine, May 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

We hope that 1918 may bring happiness and peace

A New Year message for men from Reading hoped for peace this year.

TO OUR SOLDIERS AND SAILORS ON ACTIVE SERVICE

Dear friends

The vicar has invited me to write a few lines to you who are so nobly and faithfully serving in the Forces, and very gladly I accept the invitation.

I am bold enough to open with the old old greeting – “A Happy New Year”. It is what you would wish us all at home, and in fullest measure we hope that 1918 may bring happiness and peace to you all. Would that we could grasp you by the hand as we say it; for indeed the greeting comes to you with our earnest prayers, and our kindest thoughts….

You to whom these lines are written are scattered far and wide, and some will not read it until many weeks have gone by. But be assured, dear brothers, that the heart of the parish is warm with a real affection towards you all, and there are frequent times when in our intercessions for you we are conscious that at the same moment God hears our petitions for you all and neither time nor distance count with Him in the bestowal of His grace and blessing.

May He guard and guide and bless you all.

Yours very sincerely

Frank Winter.

WEEK OF PRAYER.

The Abbey Hall having been commandeered by the Military Authorities it will not be possible to hold the Meetings usually arranged in connection with the universal week of prayer.

Reading St. John parish magazine, January 1918 (D/P172/28A/24)

Home from the front

A Newbury teacher welcomed her husband home on leave.

8th January 1918
Mrs Winter absent to meet her husband from front.

Newbury St Nicolas CE (Boys) School log book (90/SCH/5/3, p. 40)

It is of national importance that insects should be destroyed in order to save the food crops

It will probably distress today’s nature lovers to read of the wholesale destruction of insects who were thought to be putting the nation’s food supply at risk.

Insect Pests

At the beginning of September, Mrs. Winter offered Prizes of 3s., 2s., and 1s. to the School children who collected the greatest number of Cabbage Butterflies. Although rather late in the season, and after many had been destroyed, Arthur Waller managed to bring in 211, and Olive Arnold 48; no other child brought any, but it is hoped that if the Prizes are offered again in 1918 there will be many more competitors. Seeing the great destruction caused this summer by the caterpillars of the White Cabbage and the Sulphur butterflies it is of national importance that the insects should be destroyed in order to save the food crops.

Wargrave parish magazine, November 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

Squads of schoolboys to bring in the harvest

Shortages of labour due to the vast numbers of men gone to the war combined with restricted imports to lead to fears for a food crisis.

Public School Boys as Harvesters

The Director-General of National Service has appealed for the help of the elder boys from Public and Secondary Schools as a Reserve of Labour.

There has been good response from the Schools on the part of the Masters and Boys.

Free railway warrants are to be provided for volunteers undertaking work for two consecutive weeks in term time or three consecutive weeks in the holidays.

Boys will be organised in squads. Each squad will be in charge of an assistant master.

Squads will not be asked to do any work under this Scheme on Sundays.

Boys will receive the current rate of wages applicable to the locality, i.e. 3d to 4d. per hour. Boys will only be paid for work done. When not employed through wet weather or for other reasons, they will receive no pay.

Squads for fruit picking are included in the Scheme.

The Rev. R. Holmes, White Waltham Vicarage, Maidenhead, is Secretary for this District and he has asked the Vicar, the Rev. S. M. Winter, to act as Local Correspondent for Wargrave. Applications for the services of such volunteer workers for further particulars should be addressed to him.

Potato Spraying

The Food Protection Committee, through the kindness of the President, have taken steps to obtain Sprayers and the necessary Spraying Material.

The Sprayers will be lent by the Committee to all who require them, and the Liquid will be obtainable at cost price.

Wargrave parish magazine, July 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

A Food Economy meeting in perfect harmony with the National demands

Women in Hare Hatch met to discuss the new Food Economy Campaign.

Hare Hatch Notes

On Wednesday Afternoon, May 16th, a conference was held to consider the national question of Food Economy. Mrs. Winter kindly presided. Much useful information was given, hints as to method and ways of economy were freely discussed. The spirit of the meeting was in perfect harmony with the National demands. Our thanks are due to Mrs. Winter for her valuable assistance.

Wargrave parish magazine, June 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

Wartime cookery

Wargrave villagers were interested in how to cope with food shortages.

Food Economy

A very successful meeting was held on Thursday, April 19th, in the Iron Church Building, by kind permission of the owners. Lady Nott-Bower represented the Ministry of Food in London, and made an admirable speech. There was accommodation for two hundred and fifty people and there were very few vacant chairs.

A collection of recipes suitable for War-time cookery is always on exhibition in the Parish Room.

Mrs. Winter will be very glad to receive recipes, which have been found successful, to add to the collection.

The Committee will be very pleased to receive suggestions as to any way in which it may be thought that they could give useful help.

Wargrave parish magazine, May 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

“Help the country and benefit yourself”

St John’s Church in Reading was a latecomer to promoting war savings, but explained its scheme very clearly.

S. JOHN’S WAR SAVINGS ASSOCIATION

Though somewhat late in the field, an Association for War Savings has now been started. Early in the month of March a meeting of the parishioners was held with the object of forming the Association for the parish and congregations of the two churches. A committee was formed as follows: the Rev. W Britton, chairman; Mr Haslam, vice-chairman; Miss Winter, treasurer; Mr Penson, secretary, with Miss Ridley and Miss Rundell as assistant secretaries; the other members of the committee being Mr F Winter, rev. R W Morley, Mr Badcock, Mr Hopcraft, Mrs Harrison Jones, Miss Wilkinson, Mrs Herbert Kingham, and Miss Ayres.

Subscriptions will be received at the Princes Street Mission Room, on Monday in each week from 12 noon to 12.45 pm; and also once a month after the District Vistors’ Meeting at 3.15 pm. Subscriptions will also be received at the Albert Road Mission Room, on Tuesday in each week, from 2.30 pm to 3.30 pm. The first day of attendance to receive subscriptions will be Monday April 2nd…

By this scheme, subscribers purchase from the collector a 6d coupon, which is stuck onto a card with 31 spaces for 31 coupons. When all the spaces are filled with coupons value … in total 15s 6d, a certificate for £1 will then be given in exchange for the card. This certificate can be cashed for 15s 6d at any time within twelve months from the date of issue, and for 15ts 9d at the end of one year, at the end of 2 years for 16 s 9d, at the end of 3 years for 17s 9d, at the end of 4 years for 18s 9d, and 5 years for £1.

The advantage of joining this Association is that, if there are say 31 members and they each purchase a 6d coupon, a certificate for 15s 6d is immediately purchased by the secretary. The first member to complete his or her card by having purchased 31 coupons, will receive this certificate, which will be dated some weeks back, viz at the time of purchase by the secretary. By the time it comes into the hands of the member a small sum by way of interest will have accrued…

Note the following points: Saving helps the Country which needs labour and materials for winning the War, and money with which to pay for them.

By saving, later on you will have £1 to spend instead of 15s. 6d. In this way you help the country and benefit yourself. Begin at once and get all the benefit you can.

Reading St. John parish magazine, April 1917 (D/P172/28A/24)

Returned from the front

A Newbury teacher had time off to see her husband, home on leave.

20th March 1917
Mrs Winter granted leave of absence to meet her husband returned from the front in France.

Newbury St Nicolas CE (Boys) School log book (90/SCH/5/3, p. 33)

A call for economical but wholesome recipes

The vicar of Wargrave was at the heart of the village’s flourishing War Savings Association, and also efforts to encourage food to be produced locally. The March issue of the parish magazine announced:

War Savings and War Rations

A meeting of the Wargrave War Savings Association will be held on Saturday, March 10th at 7 .p.m., in the Iron Church Building. All Parishioners are most cordially invited to attend. The subject of War Rations will also be discussed.

The total sum paid into the Secretary’s hands up to February 26th, amounts to £1014 9s. 6d., which has been extended in the purchase of 726 Certificates value £1 five years hence; 21 value £12 five years hence: and 13 value £25 five years hence.

Bonus

There is no doubt that the Chairman’s kind gift of one sixpenny coupon on every Certificate up to ten has proved a strong inducement to save that number. And he is so pleased with the response that he has most generously determined to extend his offer up to 25 Certificates for each person.

Vicarage Office Hours

On Saturdays 9.30-10.30 .a.m. and 5.30-6.30 .p.m. the Parish Room is open for War Savings Business.

Certificates due members may then be obtained, and Certificates may be purchased.

During the days of the War Loan the Vicar was glad to welcome War Savings business on any day and at any time when he was at home, but he must now ask members to be more particular in the observance of Office Hours.

Money may be sent to the Vicar if accompanied with a clear statement of Certificates required, full names and sufficient postal address.

The meeting duly took place:

War Savings Association

A very well attended Meeting was held on Saturday, March 10th, in the Iron Church Building. Mr. Bond presided and gave an address on Food Production and War Rations.

A Committee was appointed for Food Production of which Mrs. Bulkeley is Chairman, supported by Mrs. Hinton, Miss. Rhodes, and Messrs. Butcher, Chenery, Crisp and Pope.

A good deal of work has already been done in organising parties to dig, and in providing allotments and seed potatoes for those who want them.

A Committee was also appointed for Food Economy in charge of Mrs. Winter, supported by Mrs. Bennett, Mrs. Cain, Mrs. Chenery, and Mrs. Hermon.

It is hoped that the committee may give much help in disseminating information and enlisting support. Mrs. Winter will be very grateful for any economical recipes which have proved wholesome and successful. These recipes will be exhibited in the Parish Room.

Wargrave parish magazine, March and April 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

The war has drawn bellringers closer together

Bellringers pondered the war. Sonning Deanery Branch of the Oxford Diocesan Guild of Church Bell Ringers was an umbrella organisation for bellringers of the parish churches of Arborfield, Easthampstead, Finchampstead, Hurst, Sandhurst, Sonning, Wargrave, Wokingham All Saints and Wokingham St Paul.

The annual meeting of the branch was held at Wokingham on Jan. 6th [1917]. Proceedings commenced with Evensong, address, & Intercessions for those engaged in the war, at St Paul’s Church, at 5.30 pm. Some 40 members attended. The Rev. S M Winter, vicar of Wargrave, gave an excellent address, based upon Judges XIV.14, in the course of which he pointed out how out of peril came forth sweetness, out of death a new life, out of dry bones a busy hive of industry, out of a barren field a fruit which shall be sweet to those that come after. There was no one, at that time, but was thinking of the “War”, which had now reached its 3rd year, & no one could foresee when it might end. Out of it had come a new binding & uniting force for the Empire that had made it stronger than ever before. It had given a new value to time, to money, a shame to idleness, selfishness & waste not understood before, & many a new triumph over disease.

We might apply the same sort of lesson to our church belfries. The bells played their part in peace & war. Now silent, might they again ring many a peal of thanksgiving in God’s good time – for the restoration of peace in equity & justice, a peace that should advance God’s Kingdom throughout the world! All had learnt a noble lesson of self-sacrifice from those members of their belfries, who had endured such terrible sufferings, & those who had laid down their loves for King & Country; each member, he hoped, might learn to do his duty, “as unto God, & not unto man”, in a better & higher way. The war had drawn them all closer together both in the Belfry, & outside of it; and so they gave their answer to the riddle, “out of the eater came forth meat, out of the strong came forth sweetness”….

Mr Winter… trusted that the restrictions upon bell-ringing would soon be removed, & joyous peals be forthcoming by reason of a secured peace. The Rev. H M Wallis congratulated the members upon the numbers attending the service, & hoped that some sweetness might accrue, even from the bitterness of the enemies’ hate….

Since their last annual meeting, the Master of the Guild, Rev. C W O Jenkyn, had won the Military Cross.

Minutes of Sonning Deanery Branch of the Oxford Diocesan Guild of Church Bell Ringers (D/EX2436/1)

Mosquito nets and sandbags

Ascot ladies’ sewing now including manufacturing mosquito nets, perhaps for those wounded in fighting in the Middle East.

All Saints Parish Working Party for the War will re-open Thursday, October 5th, at 2 p.m, and will be continued on subsequent Thursdays until further notice. The Working Party has now been formally affiliated with the Ascot War Hospital Supply Depot, and, so far, eight War Office badges have been awarded as follows: Mrs. Bunce, Mrs. Ednie, Mrs. Grimmett, Mrs. Hullcoop, Mrs. Moore, Mrs. Morton, Mrs. Sumner, Miss A. Winter.

The number of articles made by the Working Party up to date has been.-

130 Capeline bandages, 5 hip bandages, 75 bed jackets, 35 shirts, 45 pairs socks, 30 pairs operation stockings, 80 cushions, 60 mosquito nets, 40 small beaded mats, 117 sandbags: total 637.

Donations made to the amount of £59 17s. 4d. have been received: expenditure, £44 0s. 11d.: leaving a balance in hand of £15 16s. 5d.

Further contribution will be gratefully received by Mrs. Tottie, Sherlocks, Ascot.

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine, October 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/10)