Reading School’s contribution to the war

A complete listing of Reading School’s alumni who had served in the war.

OLD BOYS SERVING IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES.

This list has been compiled from information received up to December 14th, 1918; corrections and additions will be welcomed and should be addressed to: – R. Newport, Esq., Reading School, Reading.

Allnatt, Rifleman N.R. — London Rifle Brigade.
(killed in Action).
Ambrose, 2nd Lieut. L.C. — S.L.I.
Anderson, Pte. L.G. — Can. Exp. Force
Appelbee, 2nd Lieut. T. — 13TH West Yorks.
(Killed in Action).
Atkinson, Lieut. E.G. — Indian Army
Atkinson, Capt. G.P. — 6TH Royal North Lancs.
Atkinson, 2nd Lieut. J.C. — R.A.F.
Aust, 2nd Lieut. H.E. — Yorkshire Regt.
(Twice Wounded).
(Killed in Action).
Aveline, Lieut. A.P. — Royal Berks Regt,
(Wounded).
(Military Cross).
Baker, 2nd Lieut. A.C.S. — R.G.A.
Baker, Rifleman A.E. — London Irish Rifles.
(Wounded).
Baker, Rifleman R.S. — London Irish Rifles.
(Wounded).
Baker, Lieut. T.H. — 8TH Royal Berks Regt.
(Wounded)
Balding, Capt. C.D. — Indian Army.
Banks, Pte. W.R. — Public School Corps.
(Killed in Action).
Bardsley, Capt. R.C — Manchester Regt.
(Wounded).
Barnard, F.P. —
Barroby, Trooper. F. — Strathcona Horse.
Barry, Capt. L.E. — R.A.F.
Baseden, Lieut. E. — Royal Berks Regt.
(Killed in Action).
Baseden, 2nd Lieut. M.W. — R.A.F.
Batchelor, Lieut. A.S. — Duke of Cornwall’s L.I.
Bateman, Capt. W.V. — Royal Munster Fusiliers.
Bayley, 2nd Lieut. F. — Chinese Labour Battalion.
Beckingsale, Pte. R.S. — Canadian Contingent.
Beckingsale, Capt. R.T. — Tank Corps (Military Cross).
(Wounded).

Belsten, E.K. — R.A.F.
Biddulph, 2nd Lieut. R.H.H. — Royal Berks Regt.
(Died of Wounds).
Bidmead, Pte. — Wilts regt.
Black, Pte. F. — Public School Corps.
(Killed in Action).
Blazey, A.E.H. — R.A.F.
Blazey, 2nd Lieut. J.W. — Royal Berks Regt
(killed in Action).
Bleck, Lieut. W.E. — R.F.A.
Bliss, 2nd Lieut. A.J. — Leinster Regt.
(Killed in Action).
Bliss, Pte. W. — 2ND Batt.Hon.Art.Coy. (more…)

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A nice consignment

Possibly a bit late to be of use, but Remenham continued to support the war right up to the end.

RECTOR’S LETTER

In response to the appeal sent by the National Salvage Council to Mrs Barber, Culham Court, for fruit-stones and nut-shells, we were able to send a nice consignment to the Depot at Southend on Sea, and received a kind acknowledgment. Those who sent collections of stones and nut-shells to the Rectory were Mrs Ames, Mrs Barber, Miss Bradford, Miss “Peggy” Simpson, and Messrs Ward, Wallis, Woods and Gibbons.

Remenham parish magazine, November 1918 (D/P99/28A/4)

Lectures to the interned

A local JP wanted to enliven the lives of the internees stuck in Reading Prison. Sadly, this request was destined to be turned down by the Prison Commission.

11th April 1918

About a month ago Mr Jackson, one of the Borough Visiting magistrates, asked if a friend of his, Mr H M Wallis, Ashton Lodge, Christchurch Road, Reading – also a Borough magistrate, could give a lecture to the interned men here.

I told Mr Jackson his best procedure would be to request Mr Wallis to write to me, and to submit a syllabus of the proposed lecture, and that I would then refer the matter to the Prison Commissioners.

Mr Wallis called on me today, and asked if such a lecture would be allowed, and also left me the attached syllabus of three lectures to select from [not actually attached].

I am informed that Mr Wallis is an able lecturer, but have not met him before. Should the Commissioners approve, the lecture would be held on a weekday in the chapel.

I informed Mr Wallis that I would submit his proposal to the Commissioners. The lecture would of course be voluntary attendance.

C M Morgan

Gov.
[to]
The Commissioners

Reading Prison [Place of Internment] letter book (P/RP1/8/2/1)

The war has drawn bellringers closer together

Bellringers pondered the war. Sonning Deanery Branch of the Oxford Diocesan Guild of Church Bell Ringers was an umbrella organisation for bellringers of the parish churches of Arborfield, Easthampstead, Finchampstead, Hurst, Sandhurst, Sonning, Wargrave, Wokingham All Saints and Wokingham St Paul.

The annual meeting of the branch was held at Wokingham on Jan. 6th [1917]. Proceedings commenced with Evensong, address, & Intercessions for those engaged in the war, at St Paul’s Church, at 5.30 pm. Some 40 members attended. The Rev. S M Winter, vicar of Wargrave, gave an excellent address, based upon Judges XIV.14, in the course of which he pointed out how out of peril came forth sweetness, out of death a new life, out of dry bones a busy hive of industry, out of a barren field a fruit which shall be sweet to those that come after. There was no one, at that time, but was thinking of the “War”, which had now reached its 3rd year, & no one could foresee when it might end. Out of it had come a new binding & uniting force for the Empire that had made it stronger than ever before. It had given a new value to time, to money, a shame to idleness, selfishness & waste not understood before, & many a new triumph over disease.

We might apply the same sort of lesson to our church belfries. The bells played their part in peace & war. Now silent, might they again ring many a peal of thanksgiving in God’s good time – for the restoration of peace in equity & justice, a peace that should advance God’s Kingdom throughout the world! All had learnt a noble lesson of self-sacrifice from those members of their belfries, who had endured such terrible sufferings, & those who had laid down their loves for King & Country; each member, he hoped, might learn to do his duty, “as unto God, & not unto man”, in a better & higher way. The war had drawn them all closer together both in the Belfry, & outside of it; and so they gave their answer to the riddle, “out of the eater came forth meat, out of the strong came forth sweetness”….

Mr Winter… trusted that the restrictions upon bell-ringing would soon be removed, & joyous peals be forthcoming by reason of a secured peace. The Rev. H M Wallis congratulated the members upon the numbers attending the service, & hoped that some sweetness might accrue, even from the bitterness of the enemies’ hate….

Since their last annual meeting, the Master of the Guild, Rev. C W O Jenkyn, had won the Military Cross.

Minutes of Sonning Deanery Branch of the Oxford Diocesan Guild of Church Bell Ringers (D/EX2436/1)

Cheering details from the front

An evening for soldiers’ loved ones in Stratfield Mortimer was a positive occasion.

The War Supper

We call it this for want of a better title. For the third year Mr. and Mrs. Wallis most kindly entertained the fathers and mothers and wives of all the men of the Parish now serving in H.M. Forces. The event took place at the Parish Room, on January 3rd and, happily, there was just room to get everyone in, though the numbers have increased each year.

After a splendid supper the toast of the King was proposed by Mr. Wallis together with that of his Forces, after which the Vicar proposed the toast of our host and hostess and expressed the thanks of the company for the enjoyable evening. For the entertainment that followed, Mr. Wallis’ relations from Basingstoke are responsible, and one can only say that it would be difficult to get together any company which could have given more pleasure. Want of space forbids a description of all the items which formed a programme full of attraction, and it must suffice to say that most of us are seldom privileged to hear such first-class singing as we heard that night.

During a short interval Captain Wallis, who had arrived from France that morning, gave us some cheering details about the state of things at the Front.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, February 1917 (D/P120/28A/14)

A “war party”

The families of Stratfield Mortimer soldiers and sailors were treated to a New Year’s party.

War Party
We call it this for want of a better heading. Last year Mr. and Mrs. Wallis conceived the kindly thought of inviting to supper all the parents and wives of those serving with the forces, and this year they were good enough to repeat it. The supper was held in the Parish Room on Tuesday, January 4th, and was a big success in every way. The fact that hardly another person could have been squeezed into the room is convincing testimony that the parish has tried to do its duty, and we realize that we owe a debt of gratitude to the host of the evening not only for his hospitality, but also for the fact that his guests were so many.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, February 1916 (D/P120/28A/14)