A cordial “welcome home”

Reading soldiers were coming home.

We have been glad to see Lieutenant W. D. Hart, MC, once more in his old place in the choir, and we give him a cordial “welcome home”.

We also give cordial welcome to the other brethren restored to us during the past month by the demobilization. We have been glad to see once more in our midst:

Lieut. Wilfred Beer, Private G. S. Hampton, Sergeant E. C. Dracup, Lance-Corporal A. E. Hawkins, Corporal R. S. Woolley, Corporal A. Butt, Private F. W. Snell, Private E. R. Robertson, Gunner A. G. Walker, Private V. Mace, and Private A. W. Panting.

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, March 1919 (D/N11/12/1/14)

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A marvellous escape from an airship crash

Broad Street Church kept in contact with all its men who had joined up.

News has now been received from Air-Mechanic Fred W. Warman to the effect that he is interned at Croningen in Holland. He was acting as wireless-operator in the air-ship which came down there, and had a marvellous escape. We are glad to know that he writes in a bright and cheerful strain, and that he is trying to make the best of things.

Flight Sub-Lieut W. R. Taper of the RNAS has been appointed for duty in Malta. It has been a pleasure to see him frequently in our midst in recent weeks. The good wishes of many friends at Broad Street will go with him as he takes up his new duties.

BROTHERHOOD NOTES

Brother Woolley has consented to continue his good services by acting as correspondent with our members on service. This [is] a quiet piece of work which is bound to have its good results when things are normal again.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR

The list of our men who have responded to the call of God and King and Country. (more…)

Deserving of high praise

Biscuit factory workers at Huntley & Palmer’s gave some of their earnings for the benefit of wounded soldiers.

Intercessions list

We are asked to remember the following who have gone “overseas”:

Privates J. Taylor, A. Victor Brown, Frank Griffin, 2nd lieut. G.A.F. Gillmor.

Missing: Lc. Corpl. Harold Walker (Essex Regt), Lc. Corpl. A.A.V. Smith (17th Middlesex Regt)

R.I.P.: Frederick J.T. Knoll (M.G.C.), Thomas Hook (Sussex Regt), William John Darboarn (Canadian Mounted Rifles), 2nd Lieut G.W. Baxter, Private A.G. Oliver (K.R.R.), Gunner A. Oliver.

The voluntary contributions made by the women employed at Huntley & Palmers factory for the wounded soldiers in Reading is indeed deserving of high praise. I see that from May, 1915 to June, 1917, they have contributed £286 13s. 7.5 d. I know the soldiers greatly appreciate their kindness.

Reading St Giles parish magazine, August 1917 (D/P96/28A/32)

Setting such a good example in food economy, that at present there is not much prospect of compulsory rationing

Reading clergy agreed none of their churches would put on a tea for Sunday School children this year.

THE VICAR’S LETTER

My dear friends,

The Bishop of Oxford, in the Diocesan Magazine for this month, calls especial attention to the effort that is to be made following on the National Mission of last year. To stimulate prayer and interest and self-sacrifice for the overseas work of the Church, Sunday, October 14th, and the days following have been set apart for this purpose in Reading, and we hope that there will be a wide response. The Bishop expresses his earnest wish that we and our people should realise the great obligations laid upon us by the war for the evangelization of the world…

At a meeting of the clergy, of all denominations in Reading, held a short time ago, it was resolved that there should be no Sunday School Teas as usual, but that an afternoon should be set aside for games and sports. We are sure that both children and parents will feel that at this time public meals of any sort are to be avoided. We understand that so many town, including Reading, are setting such a good example in food economy, that at present there is not much prospect of compulsory rationing.

Your friend and vicar,
W W Fowler

LIST OF MEN SERVING IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES

The following additional names have been added to our prayer list: George Bernard, Bernard Walker, Charles Simmonds, Ernest Dormer, William Cooper.

In addition to those already mentioned we especially commend the following to your prayers:

KILLED IN ACTION: Albert Denham, Frank Snellgrove, George Jeram.

SICK: Alban Fixsen, William May, Cornelius O’Leary, Francis Broadhurst.

WOUNDED: Frederick Smithers, Frank Taylor, Gilbert Adams.

MISSING: William Wynn.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, July 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

A real “Godsend” to the boys

Churchgoers in Reading and Windsor paid for a recreation “Hut” behind the front lines.

Notes from the Vicar

Intercessions list

Ptes. W.G. Pearce, 2nd Worcestershire Regt,; H.A.T. Wicks, 33rd Training Reserve Batt,; H.W. March, 47th Canadians.

Missing: Lce,-Cpl. Harold Walker.

Sick and Wounded: Pte Green; Pte. Bailey.

Departed: Lce,-Cpl. J. Cole; Gunner W. Shaw. R.I.P.

C.E.M.S.

The following report has been received about the Reading and Windsor Federation Hut.

“Everything has been done to make this Hut one of the most attractive and comfortable in this area. Crowds of men pass through daily, and much use is made of the stationary Literature, and Games provided for their comfort. Concerts are held, Lantern Services and Voluntary services of all kinds. It’s a real “Godsend” to the boys.”

Subscriptions are still needed to supply the above Hut. And will be gratefully received by the Hon. Sec. Mr. Lane, 5/-

H.J. HINDERLEY, Hon. Sec.

Reading St Giles parish magazine, May 1917 (D/P96/28A/34)

News of Reading men

The vicar of Reading St Giles drew parishioners’ attention to local men who had recently joined the armed forces or been wounded or killed.

The Vicar’s letter
Intercessions

Lieut. W.T. Stevens, 6th Leicestershire Rgt.; Private C. J. Walker, C.E.F. ; Corp. William Eades Taylor, 8th Royal Berks Regt. ; Cadet G.A.F. Gillmore, 4th O.C.B., Oxford; Private Edward Whiteway, Royal Berks Regt.

Sick and Wounded: Private Harry Sturgess; Private Thomas Morgan; 2nd Lieut. R. S. Wakeford. R.F.C.; Private J. Desbridge, A.S.C.

R.I.P.: Gunner Seymour W. Soole, R.F.A.; Lieut C.D. Vanstone; James Lavender (Killed in action at sea); Albert E. Ayres, R.N

Reading St Giles parish magazine, March 1917 (D/P96/28A/34)

“I am quite happy and enjoy life immensely, wouldn’t have missed it for anything”

Several men from Reading St Giles had fallen in the war. The vicar pays a personal tribute to their heroism:

NOTE FROM THE VICAR

Hearty congratulations to Sergt. S.W. White, 1/4th R. Berks, on winning the D.M.C. I believe he is the first of the old C.L.B. boys to obtain honours in the war.

To the list of the fallen in the war is a long one this month, and it contains some names closely connected with the work of the church (Reginald Golder, Herbert Day, Harry Walker, Leonard Smith), they all played their part bravely and have died gloriously, and I am sure we shall not forget them nor their good work here. All four were splendid types of the real patriot who thought no sacrifice too great for England: all four loved the church they worshipped in and, as I know well, did not forget the lessons they were taught in it.

Reginald Golder was a very special friend of mine, he rarely missed coming to see me each ‘leave’ and his devotion to his Grandfather in the days gone by was something to admire. His final words in his last letter to me, written a few days before the final action in which he was taken prisoner:

“I am quite happy and enjoy life immensely, wouldn’t have missed it for anything.”

It was a letter showing his deep interest in the things and persons connected with S. Giles’. To the parents and relatives of all these brave men we give our heartfelt sympathy. For them we give our prayers and our affection: they have won a great reward.

To be added to the intercessions list: Private E.F. Mundy, 11th Labour Batt, Royal Berks Regt,; Lieut Frank Moore, 22nd Batt King’s Royal Rifles; Cpl. C.V. Pyke, R.F.C. ; George Biles, 3rd Batt,. Royal Berks Regt.; Geoffrey Church ; Lieut. Boston; Private A.T. Henton, 9th Royal Berks Regt,; Private W. Clare, A.S.C. ; Private S. Watson, Grenadier Guards; Private J. Gibbons, 6th Batt. R.I.F.; Private T.B. Mills, London Scottish.

Sick and Wounded: Private S.J. Tugwell, D.C.L.I.; L, Cpl. Mark Seymour, R.E.; Private W Hart; Private G.F. Stroud, A.S.C.; C.S.M.L. Goodenough 1/4 Royal Berks Regt.; Private E. Wilson, 24th London R.; Gunner H.G. West,R.F.A; L. Cpl. A Harris, Royal Berks Regiment.; Private Redstone, Private G.W. Holloway, 3rd Gloucester Regt.

Prisoners: Private H. Guttridge, Private James Smith. ¼ Royal Berks Regt.

Missing: Private Albert Langford, ¼ Royal Berks Regt.; L.Cpl. Jack Foulger, West Kents; Private Frederick Long, 6th Batt. Royal Berks Regt.; L. Cpl. H. Goldstone, R.W. Surry Regt.

Departed: Private Davey, L. Cpl Herbert Dray, Sergt. Reginald Golder, 2/4 Royal Berks Regt.; Private R. Morris, Private S. Land, Private H.V. Walker, ¼ Royal Berks Regiment,; Private A. Josey. 2nd Hants; Private J. Miles, Oxford and Bucks Lt. Infantry; Private Arthur T. Knott, Private T. Seymour, Royal Berks Regt.; Private Edward Rogers, 8th Batt. Royal Berks Regt.; Private John Simmonds, 6thBatt. Royal Berks Regt.; Private H. Leonard West, Canadian Cont.; Driver Rodney Lock, A.S.C.; Sergt Clement Perrin, 1/4 Royal Berks Regt.

Reading St Giles parish magazine, October 1916 (D/P96/28A/34)

Conspicuous bravery in the field

A Hare Hatch man was commended for his courage in battle.

Hare Hatch Notes

We hear with pride, the good news that Cpl. O. Hussey, the son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Hussey, Tag Lane, has distinguished himself on the field of battle. Below is a copy of the Official report from the Major General of the 7th Division.

“ 30/7/16. Cpl. O. Hussey, 95th Field Co., R.E.
“Your Commanding Officer has informed me that you
“have distinguished yourself by conspicuous bravery
“in the field on 1st July, 1916. I have read this report
“and although promotion and decoration cannot be
“given in every case, I should like you to know that
“your gallant action is recognised and greatly appre-
“ciated.”

We heartily congratulate Orlando and trust that he may be spared to return home with greater honours.

A.E.C

Crazies Hill Notes:
Bravery in the Field:

Our heartiest congratulations to Lance-Corporal Herbert Richard Plested of the 1st Royal Berks Regiment who was mentioned in Despatches September, 1915, and who has now received the following letter:-

Your Commanding Officer and Brigade Commander has informed me that you have distinguished yourself by conspicuous bravery in the field on the 2nd and 28th July, 1916. I have read their reports, and, although promotion and decorations cannot be given in every case, I should like you to know that your gallant action is recognised and how greatly it is appreciated.
W.G. Walker, Major General,
August 3rd, 1916 Commanding 2nd Division.

Wargrave parish magazine, September 1916 (D/P145/28A/31)

Throwing darts at the Kaiser

A number of entertaining evenings were held for wounded soldiers in Earley. One suspects that throwing darts at the Kaiser’s anatomy was a particular favourite.

EARLEY WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINMENT FUND

I regret the delay in publishing this report, which has been unavoidable. Since my last, and up to the time of writing, five more Entertainments have been given: on each occasion about 50 guests have been invited, including 25 on one occasion from the Canadian Contingent at Bearwood. With the exception of the special event on the 29th December, the proceedings have been similar to those already described.

Contributors to the funds have given further help and attended willingly to assist, and there has been no lack of musical and other talent in providing amusement for our guests, amongst them being several members of the ASC stationed at Earley, Miss Marjorie Francis, Miss Elsie Francis, Mrs Dracup, Mrs Hart and Mrs Dowsett, Miss Elsie Smith (who has been of great help at the piano), Mr Tunbridge, Mr H Walker, Mr Tom Morley, Mr Edwin Love with his party, the Misses Francis and Hayward, and Mr Maurice Love, in “Mixed Pickles” and “Bridget’s Blunders”, have greatly assisted in completing the success of each event.

The introduction of a further original game by Mr Love in substitution for pinning the tail on the donkey has been a nearly lifesize picture on a board of the Kaiser, numbered in the vital parts for darts to be thrown at, and which has excited keen competition.

The loan of motor cars by Mrs Joel, Mr Barnard, Mr Ricard Lea, Mr Helps, Mr Heelas, Mr A C Jordan, Mr Bonnett, Mrs Dunlop, Mrs Evans and Lieut. Usmar (who with his wife we are sorry to lose from the district as they took such a great interest in our work) has been a real boon, as without this help our expenses in hire of conveyances would have been very considerable.

A further list of donors and of gifts in kind will appear in due course. The present position of the fund is

Cash received to date £41.9.5

And paid out (exclusive of the last Entertainment and Account for Hire of Cars) £27.6.10.

The committee will gladly welcome any further help in cash, loan of motors or gifts in kind so as to continue these Entertainments.

Chas J. Howlett
Hon. Treasurer
28/2/16

Earley St Peter parish magazine, March 1916 (D/P191/28A/23/1)

A real Christmas for wounded soldiers

70 wounded soldiers recovering in Reading were treated to a Christmas dinner no one would ever forget.

EARLEY WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINMENT FUND

Of course the Christmas dinner [on 29 December 1915] has been “the event” – 12 men from each of the five Reading War Hospitals were invited. It consisted of a three-course dinner: soup, meat, puddings, &c. Two large turkeys were sent from our generous friends at Maiden Erlegh, who also sent two huge Christmas puddings and other good things. Mrs Fowler sent a ham and trifle, Mrs Heelas a joint of beef and also cooked for us a third turkey purchased out of the funds, whilst Mrs Wilson cooked for us a second ham also purchased. The Misses Hannaford sent sufficient hot mince pies; Miss Howlett, apples; soup, toast, apples and pears by myself and wife; Mrs Love, floral decorations and serviettes; Miss Goodwin and Mrs Francis, mince pies; Lieut. and Mrs Usmar, Mr W H White, Mr Fred Bright and Mr Watson, cigarettes; Mr Harris, bread; Mr Wooldridge and Mr Wilson, potatoes; Mrs Ballard, tea; Miss Jordan, sugar; Messrs Gregory, Love & Co, Ltd, bon-bons; and last, but not least, we must thank Mr H Allnatt, the well-known caterer, for his great help in providing us with cookers, fuel, cutlery, china, tabling, cruets, etc.

It is needless to say that our guests had a jolly time and very greatly appreciated the efforts which had been made to give them a real Christmas gathering – one of the party rising before the close to voice the feelings of the whole in expressing their gratitude for such an outing. The carvers were the Vicar, Lieut. Usmar, Mr Watson and Mr Ellis from Maiden Erlegh, and the company present included Mrs Joel, Miss Eileen Joel, Masters Stanhope and Dudley Joel, Mrs Honey, Miss Carlsson, Mlle Weill, Miss King, Mrs Helps, Mrs Hart, Mrs A C Jordan, Mrs Wilson, Mrs Francis, Miss Jordan, Miss Goodwin, The Misses Beauchamp, Mrs Culham, Mrs Howlett, Mrs Love, Miss Usmar, The Rev. H Wardley King (who has been of the greatest assistance in arranging the transport on each occasion), Mr Heelas and his sons, and Mr A C Jordan; Messrs White, Love, Howlett, Wooldridge and Wilson assisting in the general arrangements.

The programme on this occasion included two sketches entitled “The Burglar and the Girl”, by Miss Gibbs and Mr Edwin Love, and “My First Client”, by Miss I Hayward and Mr Maurice Love, Mr Walker, the well-known tenor, giving several popular songs, and Mrs Dracup.

Chas J. Howlett
Hon. Treasurer

Earley St Peter parish magazine, March 1916 (D/P191/28A/23/1)

“I wonder what the Archangel Michael thinks of destroyers and aeroplanes”

The Bishop of Peterborough and his wife wrote to their son Ralph, serving in the Dardanelles, with the latest news of political developments at home, and an encounter with two disillusioned soldiers serving with the Canadian forces. See here for more about Munro.

Nov 13 [1915]
The Palace
Peterborough

My darling Ralph

Thank you so much for your great letter to me of Nov 2nd & telling us of your going off in the Destroyer on work – & that we possibly may catch you by a letter to Marseilles – so here it is.
You will indeed have a good experience – & going about in this way will be full of new interest – but I can understand your reluctance to leave General Headquarters. I see that General Munro is gone to Salonika, & when I saw it in today’s papers, I wondered if you would have gone there with him – but you will not have gone off on your “destroyer cruise” before he left.

Everyone tells us that Munro is first rate & I heard also that in France he did a job that Haig got praised for & held a tough corner & saved us at one time, & then was not as fully appreciated for it as he should have been.

Your name appears in today’s Times, with K’s and 3 or 4 others, as “persecuted” by HM to wear your Servian & Russian orders – so there you are!

God bless & keep you
Your loving father
E C Peterborough
(more…)

Insuring the Assize Courts against air raids

The Standing Joint Committee of the County Council and Quarter Sessions met on 6 November 1915. They had to face the loss of more policemen to the Forces, and fears for courts and police buildings in the face o air raids.

A circular from the Home Office, dated 29 October, 1915, was read in which it was stated that every constable who wished to enlist should be allowed to do so if possible, and that every effort should be made by Police Authorities to facilitate enlistments by cutting down any police work which might not be essential, and by replacing regular police by the employment as Special Constables of men disqualified, by age or otherwise, from joining H M Forces….

Mr Preston moved, and Mr Walker seconded: That permission be given for a reduction of the Police Force, by enlistment, of ten unmarried constables; and that such vacancies be not filled up….

Carried. It was further resolved, on the motion of Mr Mount, MP, seconded by Mr Watson: That in addition to the ten unmarried constables mentioned in the above resolution, permission be given to a further ten unmarried constables to enlist; and that the vacancies thus caused be filled by first class reservists.

The Committee had brought to their notice the question of insuring the Assize Courts against damage by air-raids, and it was stated that the Assize Courts, County Police Station and adjoining buildings in which the Committee were concerned were insured against fire in the Atlas Insurance Co for £25,600…

Resolved: that the above mentioned properties be insured against damage by aircraft with the Atlas Insurance Co.

Standing Joint Committee minutes (C/CL/C2/1/5)

Insured against air raids

A Maidenhead hospital invested its funds in war loans, and insured its property against air raids.

10th September 1915

Insurance against damage by Air Raids.
Mr Mount proposed & Mr Beachcroft seconded that an insurance policy against damages done by air raids should be taken out – carried…

Mr Walker proposed & Mr Wyatt seconded that Lloyds Bank, Maidenhead, be authorised to make payment in full under discount on the instalment date prior to the final one due on Oct – 26th -1915 in respect of the £1500 4½ 0/0 War Loan Stock 1915-1945 which the Trustees have applied for, for the purpose of converting the sum of £1100 Consols, vested in the said Trustees – carried.

Maidenhead Cottage Hospital minutes (D/H1/1/2)

The men of Earley serving their country

An extremely long list of men with connections with Earley St Peter were receiving the support of parishioners’ prayers.

List of Names on the Roll of Honour and Prayer List
Duncan Adams, John Adams, Henry Adams, Frederick Allen, John Allen, Frank Allum, George Allum, George Ansell, Robert Ascroft, Frank Aust, William Ayres, Henry Ayres, Cyril Ayres, Reggie Ayres, John Ayres, James Auger, Samuel Auld, Charles Barton, William Barton, Clarence Burnett, Harry Bosley, Benjamin Bosley, Robert Beeson, Walter Bluring, Gordon Brown, Leonard Brown, Walter Brooker, Charles Baker, Ernest Balding, Albert Ballard, George Breach, Phillip Breach, Ernest Breach, Alfred Breach, Percy Bunday, George Bungay, William Bungay, Charles Bolton, Herbert Blyde, Lewis Blyde, Wilfrid Blyde, Arthur Buskin, Herbert Broadbear, Louis Bunce, Frank Berry, James Bowden, Henry Blathwayt, Harold Bennett, Harry Borroughs, Henry Barney, William Brett, Alfred Broad, Harry Ching, Charles Chesterman, George Chesterman, Ernest Chapman, Edwin Coldman, Edward Cottrell, Percy Cotterell, Hubert Collier, Alfred Cooper, George Comport, Guy Comport, Frank Cook, Ernest Cook, Eric Cook, Fernand Camus, John Cane, Charles Carpenter, Charles Clarke, William Clements, Charles Carpenter, Charles Clarke, William Clements, Charles Capel, Leonard Dann, Frederick Douglas, Reuben Dowsett, Renton Dunlop, Tom Durman, Jack Durman, Hugh Deeds, Ralph Deeds, Sidney Davis, Ralph Durand, Albert Denham, Frederick Dawson, Alfred Dee, Hugh Denton, Sidney Dormer, William Elliott, Charles Elliott, Reginald Elliott, Eric Evans, Alec Evans, Ernest Embery, Cyril Eaton, Eustace Finnes, George Forge, John Forge, Henry Fisher, George Fisher, William Fisher, John Fisher, George Fulford, Bernard Fixsen, Theodore Fixsen, William Farmer, Bert Farmer, Arthur Fulker, Cecil Fowler, William Fowles, Charles Goddard, Guy Goodliffe, Ernest Gowers, George Grey, Cecil Grey, Victor Gaines, Reginald Gatehouse, Herbert Garlick, Charles Phillips Groome, Samual Gould, Wilfrid George, Frank George, Gilbert Green, Frederick Goodger, Richard Goodall, Leslie Grinstead, Albert Howlett, Frederick Hearn, Arthur Hearn, Bert Hearn, Harry Harding, George Harding, Albert Harwood, William Harwood, George Harwood, Charles Haines, George Hitchcock, Albert Hitchcock, Henry Hayward, Percy Hamilton, Frank Hawkins, Albert Hosler, William Hall, Albert Hall, Henry Hall, George Hall, William Hall, Francis Harris, Arthur Harris, Richard Hayden, Fred Hull, Charles Hague, James Hague, Stanley Higgs, Leslie Heelas, Leonard Hedges, Harry Hambleton, Reginald Hawes, William Hope, Jack Howlett, Percy Howlett, Bertie Iles, Edward Iles, Percy Ilott, Thomas Ilott, Albert Ilott, Melville Innes, Walter Jeskins, Albert Jerome, Alfred Jerome, Walter Jerome, Frederick Jerome, George Jerome, Charles Jefferies, Henry Jones, Leopold Jenner, William Jeram, George Jeram, Henry Jeram, Woolf Joel, Alfred Jacobs, (more…)

‘Out of five sons, three have been killed and one is a prisoner’

The June issue of the Longworth parish magazine reported on the latest news of local soldiers.


Walter Carter, Fred Carter and our morning postman, Albert W. Walker, have joined the Army during the last month. Several more did their best to join, but were rejected on the score of health or age.

George Painton was serving on H.M.S. Goliath, and his name is not among the list of survivors. There was not a more popular lad in the village than George, or a nicer one. We do most sincerely hope that even yet it may be found that he was rescued. His home is now in Cornwall, and we are deeply grieved for his wife and family in their anxiety. And every heart in the village, we have cause to know, goes out in sympathy to our neighbours, Captain and Mrs Loder-Symonds and their family. Out of five sons three have been killed in this war and one is a prisoner. We give below some words of great comfort, and hope from our Bishop’s paper on “Patriotism in the Bible” (Mowbray, 2d).

The courage and self-sacrifice of the soldiers is a magnificent and inspiring virtue, and we are thrilled with a kind of holy exultation in the quality of our soldiers and sailors. A great many of us who cannot be soldiers find ourselves envying them a road so direct and simple into the divine kingdom. They are ordinary Englishmen, most of them by no means saints. But we cherish the words, ‘Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.’ And we trust that, whatever their faults or vices, Christ can find in those who, so simply and unostentatiously, give their life for their country, that of which He can avail Himself, even in the world which lies beyond death, so that all that is inconsistent with the divine kingdom may be purged away, with the help of the prayers of all the Church, and those brave sons who have fallen in battle or died of their wounds may be fitted for an eternal fellowship with ‘the spirits of the just men made perfect.’

Longworth parish magazine, June 1915 (D/P83/28A/10/6)