The lessons to be learnt from Mr Vickers’ life as a teacher, and his death as a soldier

Herbert Vickers, a teacher and Special Constable, had been killed earlier in the summer. The school he had taught at paid tribute to him:

October 12th 1917

Memorial to the late Mr Vickers

An impressive ceremony was held this afternoon, when managers, parents and scholars were present to witness the unveiling of the portrait of the late Mr Vickers…

Mr Willink unveiled the portrait after delivering an address to those present, on the lessons to be learnt from Mr Vickers’ life as a teacher, and his death as a soldier.

Wokingham Wescott Road School log book (C/EL87, p. 178)

Advertisements

Returning to France today

Slough and Chalvey British Infants’ School
June 4th 1917
Mrs Stewart is absent today as her husband is returning to France after leave.

Wokingham Wescott Road School
June 4th 1917

A memorial service for Mr Vickers was held at All Saints Church this afternoon at 4pm. It was specially arranged for the scholars, and 230 attended.

Slough and Chalvey British Infants’ School log book (C/EL123, p. 342); Wokingham Wescott Road School log book (C/EL87, p. 175)

Work for the “common cause”

Two of Ralph Glyn’s friends based in London – one orking in Intelligence at the War Office, the other an army officer seconded to arms manufacturer Vickers, wrote to him.

War Office
London, SW
M.I.1/113/NE

7th April, 1916

My dear Glyn

Very many thanks for your letter of March 13th. I was very glad to hear from you again after such a long time. I understand that Holdich is taking Tyrrell’s place and I expect to be writing to him by this mail also.

As regards your suggestion about I.a work in the B.C.I., I am afraid that any suggestion to strengthen this part of the B.C.I. will not be regarded with favour, because, when the B.C.I. was started, it was agreed by the representatives of the various Allies that this International Intelligence Bureau should not deal with matters which had hitherto been subjects of direct correspondence between the various GHQs concerned, and it was agreed that the B.C.I. was to be primarily a clearing house for information about contre-espionage [sic] and military statistical intelligence of a permanent or semi-permanent nature. Consequently, any attempt to meddle with enemy orders of battle or 1.a. work generally has been most severely discouraged.

I think that, when you realise this, you will probably not want to go to the B.C.I. and I shall, therefore, take no action on your part until and unless I hear from you again.

Yours ever,
C French

36, Sloane Court, SW
7th April, 1916

My dear Ralph

What has become of you?

It’s nearly a year since last I saw or heard of you and I’m now stirred into writing by seeing in the papers that your father is leaving Peterboro’.

I am so sorry: however, I expect he feels that after many strenuous year [sic] he wants to retire to a more peaceful life…

I am with Vickers now and am fairly up to my eyes in work all day and every day: it’s very interesting and real hard work; how long the WO will keep me at it I don’t, of course, know. I’ve never done a day with the W. Gds [Welsh Guards?] yet since I was transferred to them. However, as long as I feel I’m doing some work for the “common cause” I’ve nothing to complain of.

I occasionally hear scraps of news about you from Rome, or Greece, or Russia! I suppose you are dashing about all over the place on every sort of mysterious mission.

If you ever are in London, let me know – do: I’d love to see you again. Vickers House finds me all day & every day, except when I’m away at gun trials: and here we are installed in a flat – our first home!…

Yours ever,
Jack O’W

Letters to Ralph Glyn (D/EGL/C32/24-25)

Clewer Bandage Society supplies war hospitals

The ladies of Clewer were very organised in their work supporting the needs of the wounded across the country.  They reported in the parish magazine:

The Clewer Bandage Society has supplied 2,000 bandages to the 4th Dragoon Guards and boxes of bandages, old linen and lint to the London Hospital, St. Bartholomew’s, the Lonsdale Hospital, Barrow-in-Furness, which receives the accident cases from Vickers’ ship building yard, amounting to 50 daily, and since the war began has wounded soldiers also; and the Connaught Hospital, where a new consignment of wounded soldiers has just been received.
The lint has been made by the Candidates of the G.F.S. [Girls’ Friendly Society], who are pleased to render this small service to the noble defenders of out country and homes.
A blanket and some knitting has also been sent to Miss Anson for Chatham.
Contributions towards the purchase of bandage material and knitting wool are now much needed by the Secretary.
MRS. RIBBANS, Bexley Lodge, Clewer.

The Connaught Hospital,
Aldershot, 12/11/14.
Dear Madam,
The officer in charge has asked me to thank you for the most useful gifts which are so acceptable, as we are using such a tremendous amount of dressings.
The old linen does to make “many tailed” bandages for septic cases which can be used and burnt.
I will distribute the leaflets and ask some of the officers’ wives to help.
Again thanking you for your kindness,
Yours very truly,
E. M. ROBINSON, Matron.

In addition to the collection made for the Belgian refugees in Church, Mrs. Cowie and Mrs. Buttress are receiving small weekly sums for the same purpose, which are paid in to the Windsor Fund on the first day of each month.

Clewer parish magazine, December 1914 (D/P39/28A/9)