Lavender Day

Ascot parishioners were asked to contribute lavender from their gardens in a novel fundaising idea.

The Parade Service of the R.A.F. now takes place in the Church at 9, instead of in the Cinema.

‘There will be a “Lavender Day” on July 20th in aid of the Five “Ascot” beds with the Scottish Women’s Hospitals in France, Corsica and Salonika, and the Berkshire War Prisoners’ Fund. Gifts of Lavender, fresh or dried, will be gratefully received by Miss Hanbury at Holmwood least a few Lavender bushes, and the smallest quantity will be welcome if sent promptly.

The Ascot Sailors and Soldiers Committee have been distributing the printed Cards, mentioned in our last issue, for relatives to post to men serving abroad. If any have not yet received a card in a stamped envelope ready to be addressed and sent along with an ordinary letter, they should apply at once to the member of the Committee in charge of their district as follows:

High Street – A.F. Bullock
H. Woods
London Road – H. Goswell
Fernbank Road – H.Tustin
Seinley and Priory Road – J. Skelton
New Road – H. Charman
A. Morton
Kennel Ride – A.Woods

Ascot section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, July 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/6)

Show that we appreciate what they are doing for us

Ascot parish worked hard to keep in touch with its men serving overseas.

ASCOT SAILORS’ AND SOLDIERS’ COMMITTEE.

This Committee, which was formed over two years ago, endeavours to keep in touch with all Ascot men serving in the Navy and Army abroad, and to show that we appreciate what they are doing for us. In order to keep the records up to date it is important that all information and changes of address relating to the men be at once communicated to any of the following members of the Committee.
High Street: A.F. Bullock, H. Woods. London Road: H. Goswell. Fern Park Road: A. Tustin. Swinley and Priory Road: J. Skelton. New Road: H. Charman, A. Morton. Kennel Ride: A. Woods.

We deeply regret the loss of Charles Sharpe and Victor Wye, killed in action, and our sympathy goes out to their relatives.

Mrs. Paxford and family wish to thank their kind neighbours and friends for their gift and sympathy in the great bereavement.

The following are reported wounded: E.H. Beasley, C. Everett, R. Strut.

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/11)

Special friends, together again for eternity

Several Ascot men were reported to have given their lives for their country.

THE WAR.

Again we have to record the death, in service of his country of another of our choicest Ascot young men. William Taylor. What we said last month of Charles Edwards is an exact counterpart to the character of William Taylor. He was a very real soldier of Christ as well as of his country. He was the special friend of Arthur Jones, in the same regiment, and generally sharing the same quarters. They are together again now. May they both be together in peace throughout eternity. R.I.P. Our deep sympathy goes out to the bereaved family.

Edward Charles Cannon has been killed at the front. He is the son or Mr. and Mrs. Cannon of Swinley. His brother was drowned off the Dardanelles rather more than a year ago. To the family we also offer our heartfelt sympathy. R.I.P.

Alfred Thompson is dangerously wounded. His parents have been summoned to the Hospital in France where he is lying.

THE BOYS’ AND GIRLS’ SALE.

We give further details of this most successful Sale (from a Correspondent).

“The Boys’ School undertook the fruit, vegetables, and flower section: and in addition 2 stalls filled with a beautiful and varied collection, small articles (made by the boys) which displayed much ingenuity in the making, were offered for sale. The Belgian ladies and gentlemen from Ascot Wood House brought many interesting articles for sale. Two bran tubs arranged by Mrs. Tustin gave great delight to the children.

The Girls’ School had made itself responsible for the sale of useful and fancy articles. Many things were made by the girls themselves, who gave much time after school hours to complete their work. Many pleasant surprises came in the form of garments and fancy articles made and given by former pupils of the School. Many mothers, not to be outdone by their daughters, helped us much. On the Girls’ stall was a fascinating collection of baskets and other items made by our Infants.

The Infants’ School stall displayed all sorts of delicacies in the shape of cakes, sweets, jam, &c.: but although the store was large, it was quickly sold out, and not even a sweet remained.

Other attractions were the weighing machine which did a flourishing trade: the “village pump,” which brought much “solid water” in the form of prize packets at a surprising rate, and a beautifully dressed baby doll (given by an “old girl”). To win the doll one only had to guess the name that had been given to it at the beginning of the sale.

Our Teachers and Scholars would like to thank all those kind people who so generously helped by giving and by buying.

The sale realised £42 6s. 0d. (for Belgian children).

Winkfield District Magazine, September 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/9)

A spontaneous effort on the part of Ascot School lads

Schoolboys in Ascot organised a concert in aid of gifts for the troops.

ENTERTAINMENT (by boys of the Ascot Schools) – in aid of our “Ascot Sailors’ and Soldiers’ Comfort Fund,” on Wednesday, February 23rd, 1916, at All Saints Parish Room.

Part I. Miscellaneous (Songs, &tc.)
Part II. A Musical Burlesque.

*This is a spontaneous effort on the part of our Ascot School lads, supervised by Mr. A. Tustin, who have felt somewhat handicapped as to the special bit that, for their part, they can put into the War.*

There will be two performances –
at 2.45p.m. (2/6, reserved : 1/- : 6d.)
at 7.30pm (1/6, reserved : 1/- : 6d.)

Ascot section of the Winkfield District Magazine, February 1916 D/P151/28A/8/2

Who will come forward?

The parish of Ascot was keenly concerned with remembering its men in service, while coping with their lack at home.

THE WAR.

We have the following records to make.

Pte. Frederick Waite of the 3rd Batt. Royal Fusiliers has fallen in the Service of his country. Lance Corporal Stanley writes:-

“He was killed in action on the 29th of last month, doing his duty for King and country. I lost the best man in my section, and he was liked by all the platoon. We buried him the same night with his head facing the Germans.”

Our deepest sympathy is given to the family, who reside in Course Road. R.I.P.

Thomas Hudson is missing.

Percy Huxford is a prisoner of war. He writes:

“I am wounded and a prisoner. I am wounded in the fore arm, but not very bad.”

Richard Taylor is prisoner of war. He writes brightly.

The following are wounded:-
Harold Matthews, Archibald Williams Grimmett, Jack Jones, Alfred Baker, Henry Edward Freeman, Arthur Everett, Leslie Henry Walls, George Faithful, Frederick Bettison, William Skelton, Harry Henley, Frederick Wye, E.J. Streater.

The list of our Ascot men at the Front is always read out in full at the service on Wednesdays at 8 p.m. We are extremely anxious that this list should be entirely accurate. A Box for “Communications about the War” is placed on the table at the West end of the Church, in which you are invited to place any additions or corrections that may be necessary from time to time.

* * *

WHO WILL COME FORWARD to fill vacancies that stare us in the face, owing to the demands which the war makes upon the time of many of our former Church workers? We very specially need one or two Lady communicants to undertake an hour or so’s work at the Church on Saturdays mornings. We imagine that the majority of our people have a very dim conception of all that is entailed, week by week, in the preparation of the Altar, Altar Linen, and Altar Flowers for the Sundays. Moreover the Brasses have to be cleaned. On Sunday last (October 23rd) one lady, and only one, had to undertake the entire work. This ought not to be possible.

Then, we sorely need Choirmen. Even if they have not very brilliant voices, they might come and do their best, and that is all that God asks for. It would rejoice the heart of Mr. Tustin, our painstaking but handicapped Choir Master.

Then, three more Alter Servers are asked for.

* * *

WAIFS AND STRAYS SOCIETY.
This admirable organisation is holding its Annual Sale of Work, on November 10th and 11th, at the Portman Rooms, Baker Street. It has under its charge the many children of Sailors and Soldiers. Lady Jellicoe and Lady French will be present at the sale. Contributions, requests for tickets, &c. should be addressed to the Central Bazaar Secretaries, Old Town Hall, Kennington Road, S.E.

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/11)

Comfort parcels for PoWs

The people of Ascot donated generously towards parcels of food and other comforts for British PoWs in Germany.

HARVEST THANKSGIVING SERVICES were held at All Saints Church on Sunday, October 3rd. The Choir, though much thinned in numbers owing to the war, sung admirably, having been carefully trained by the Choirmaster, Mr. A. Tustin. The Church was beautifully decorated with flowers, fruit and vegetables. Afterwards, these offerings were distributed – the grapes to sick and aged parishioners; the apples and vegetables to the Priory Orphanage, the Nursing Home, and elsewhere.

On the previous Sunday a suggestion was made that “comfort parcels” should be sent to British prisoners in Germany. The response to this invitation was really remarkable. Cocoa (70 tins, and some tablets), biscuits (28lbs.), condensed milk (24 tins), wool and knitting needles, jams, tinned fruits and vegetables, raisins, macaroni, soap, tobacco, chocolate, peppermint, socks, etc., and gifts in money (including sixpence from a little girl who brought her coin to the Altar) were contributed and were eventually passed on to the Church Army whose officers had guaranteed that all these “comforts” should reach the prisoners safely.

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine November 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/11)