Subjects closely connected with the War

Food shortages had led to a soup kitchen for children in Ascot.

The Lantern Services in the Parish Room on Fridays at 7 p.m. are being taken by the Rector and deal with subjects closely connected with the War. There was a very fair attendance at the first service, and it is hoped that it will increase as the services become more generally known.

By the effort of the Teachers a Soup Kitchen is being started as the Schools for the benefit of the children, and we are sure many parents will be most grateful for this help in this difficult days. The Managers have made a small grant towards utensils, and gifts of vegetables, or offers of personal help will be welcomed by the Teachers ….

At a War Savings Conference held at the Reading Rooms, Sunninghill, on Wednesday, February 20th, it was resolve to form a local War Savings Committee for the district to be known as “The Sunningdale and Ascot District War Savings Committee”, its chief object being to establish as many new Associations as possible in the neighbourhood, the ladies and gentlemaen elected being Mr. Percy Crutchley (Chairman), Messrs. H. J. Whitehead and A.J. Merton (Hon. Secretaries), Col. Blackburn, (Hon. Treasurer), Mrs. Ninian Elliott, the Hon. Miss Gordon, Mr. E. Wolseley, Heresy Marchioness of Linthgow, Mr. G. J. Francis, Mr. F. J. Patton, Mr. C.W. Searle, Mr. J.W. Abbott, Mrs. Trotter, Mr T.A. Woods. The Committee was given power to add to its number, and it was intimated that if Sunningdale cared to join up with this Committee, the inclusion of this parish would be cordially welcomed.

The Ascot War Savings Association has just completed one year’s working. The total number of certificates sold during that time being nearly 1000.

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine, March 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/3)

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Hoping to establish as many new War Savings Associations as possible in the neighbourhood

Ascot and local aristocrats contributed financially.

At a War Savings Conference held at the Reading Rooms, Sunninghill, on Wednesday, February 20th, it was resolved to form a local War Savings Committee for the district to be known as “The Sunningdale and Ascot District War Savings Committee”, its chief object being to establish as many new Associations as possible in the neighbourhood, the ladies and gentlemen elected being Mr. Percy Crutchley (Chairman), Messrs. H. J. Whitehead and A.J. Merton (Hon. Secretaries), Col. Blackburn, (Hon. Treasurer), Mrs. Ninian Elliott, the Hon. Miss Gordon, Mr. E. Wolseley, Hersey Marchioness of Linlithgow, Mr. G. J. Francis, Mr. F. J. Patton, Mr. C.W. Searle, Mr. J.W. Abbott, Mrs. Trotter, Mr T.A. Woods. The Committee was given power to add to its number, and it was intimated that if Sunningdale cared to join up with this Committee the inclusion of this parish would be cordially welcomed.

The Ascot War Savings Association has just completed one year’s working. The total number of certificates sold during that time being nearly 1000.

Ascot section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, March 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/3)

“The White Comrade” reminds us of self-sacrifice and intercession

The church of St John the Baptist in Windsor now had a special area dedicated to the war. It was dominated by a print of the popular painting The White Comrade, by George Hillyard Swinstead, which depicted a wounded soldier being helped by an orderly, with Jesus (clad in white) looking on. Two real wounded soldiers were the artist’s models.

War Corner

Many members of our congregation will have noticed the War Corner which has been formed in the Parish Church, but there may still be some who do not yet know of it.

At the east end of the north aisle, against a dark blue background, is placed the Cross, and below it, on each side of a wooden shield on which is the picture “The White Comrade”, are the flags of the Allied Nations, and round these are hung the lists of those who are serving or who have given their lives in the war, and for whom our prayers have been asked.

The War Corner is meant to remind us of two of the great needs of today, self-sacrifice and intercession, and it is hoped that very many – children as well as adults – will, when passing the church, spare a few minutes to come and pray for God’s protection and guidance for ourselves and our Allies during the war.

It is thought that some people, particularly those who have friends serving, may like to undertake, in turn, to supply flowers or money with which to supply flowers, for the War Corner. Will any who would like to do this, kindly communicate with the vicar or with Miss Claudine Smith, 4 Claremont Road.

Mrs Trotter is very kindly giving the flowers to the end of November.

New Windsor St John the Baptist parish magazine, November 1916 (D/P149/28A/21/5)

“It is our serious duty to keep the fabric of our civilization and our religion going through the time of war”

The demands of the war meant there was less money to spare for churches and charities. the Diocese of Oxford appealed not to be forgotten.

The Oxford Diocesan Fund:

The Diocese is asked to give £4,420 (which is almost the same sum as last year) for the diocesan needs, in addition to the interest received on the invested funds of the various Societies and annual subscriptions paid direct to the Diocesan Treasurer.

Of course we are well aware how great is the demand which the war taxes are making and will make upon incomes, and also how many urgent claims the war is making for voluntary contributions. But at the same time the war is teaching us, more fully that we ever learnt it before, the meaning of sacrifice, and it is probably that we are all more ready to give than we were two years ago.

Besides supporting the war, it is our serious duty to keep the fabric of our civilization and our religion going through the time of war, so that no needless impoverishment of our common life may result from it.

The Rural Deaneries have by their representatives accepted the apportionment, and we hope that the parishes will accept each its share, to be raised by collections in Church or by other means: and we trust as well that our friends will keep up their subscriptions, so that the various Diocesan Societies may be able to carry on their work without any serious curtailment.

It will greatly assist the Treasurer, if the collections are made and forwarded to him as soon as possible and in any case before November 30th.
Signed on behalf of the Diocesan Board,
C. OXON: President
W. H. AMES, Hon. Treasurer
HENRY E. TROTTER, Hon. Secretary.

The Parish of Wargrave is asked to give £21. 5s. 1d. Last year the sum was duly raised. All collections on Sunday, September 24th, will be given to this object.

Wargrave parish magazine, September 1916 (D/P145/28A/31)

Parcels for prisoners

Women in Earley gave money for comforts for British PoWs sd erll as practicing economy at home in support of the war effort.

MOTHERS’ UNION

March 25th, the feast of the Annunciation, fell on a Saturday this year, and the annual service and enrolment was held in church on the afternoon of that day… Canon Trotter very kindly came and gave a most helpful address. Speaking on Home Influence and the Force of Example, he made a special point of economy which should be much in our minds just now, and that each one of us should try in some way to practise it.

The collection, which was for the Prisoners’ Parcel Fund, realised 17/5, and two more six shilling ones were at once sent off. Durman and Dann, the two prisoners who received those sent in February, have written thanking the Mothers’ Union for thinking of them, and saying how very grateful they are.

The Corporate Communion was held on the 26th at 8 am, and again quite a big number of mothers were present. The vicar kindly allows us to have the collection at this service, which this year amounted to 15/-. Mrs Dunlop proposes to send 10/- of it to the Women’s Fund for Disabled Soldiers and Sailors.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, May 1916 (D/P191/28A/23/5)

Our Russian Allies have been nobly bearing the chief brunt of the enemy’s attack

Women and children were at the forefront in Burghfield, Sulhamstead and Theale fundraising efforts on behalf of wounded Russians, while efforts were also made in Reading.

Sulhamstead

RUSSIAN FLAG DAY

An energetic canvass of the parish on behalf of the Russian Red Cross Society was mad eon Saturday, September 18th, by an enthusiastic band of workers, organised by Miss B Leake. It is said they met with a bright welcome at almost every house at which they called, or every person whom they asked. All the flags had been sold by 2 o’clock, and givers after that time were content to have no recognition. The collecting boxes were taken unopened to Canon Trotter on Saturday night by Miss Leake, but the counting was deferred, and was not known at the time of going to press.

The St Michael’s Scouts gathered blackberries, which they sold for the Russian Red Cross, and added £1 to the fund from their sale.

Theale

RUSSIAN FLAG DAY

It is interesting to record the efforts made, and the sums contributed, in our parish towards meeting the manifold needs of our Allies and ourselves in this time of War. During the last two months appeals have been made to the Country to assist the Russian wounded and sick, and our own Red Cross and St. John Ambulance Association. On both occasions Mr. D. M. Davies took up the work with zeal, invited the collectors and assigned them their districts.

“Russian Flag Day” was September 18th, and £8 18s. 9d. was contributed. The following collected: Mrs Charles Blatch, Miss Bunce, Miss Cowing, Miss Dance, Miss Ivy Forrester, Miss Pickford, Miss Elsie Janes, Mrs Sly and the Misses Windle.

Burghfield
RUSSIAN FLAG DAY
Our parishioners gladly and willingly responded to the appeal made by the Mayor of Reading to help the Russian Red Cross by buying flags on Saturday, September 18th, and the very satisfactory sum of £11. 13s 7d was realized as our contribution to the good cause. The Rector and Mrs George are most grateful to all the collectors who responded to their appeal, and who spared no effort to make the day a success.

Reading

A Reading church had a special fundraising day in aid of wounded Russian soldiers.

The Vicar’s notes

Our Russian Allies have been bearing so nobly the chief brunt of the enemy’s attack during the last few months that it was only fitting that we should do our best to help their wounded, who I fear, must be numbered by hundreds of thousands. So Saturday, Sept 18th was kept as Russian Flag Day, and the results were splendid; the total amount reaching, I believe, some £2,000.

Sulhamstead and Burghfield parish magazines, October 1915 (D/EX725/3); Theale parish magazine, November 1915 (D/P132B/28A/4); Reading St Mary parish magazine, October 1915 (D/P98/28A/13)

Keep the fabric of civilisation going through the war

The war and its demands on British purses was inevitably affecting giving to other causes. The Bishop of Oxford made an apeal

The Oxford Diocesan Fund: The Appeal for 1915

The Diocese is asked to give the same sum as last year for the diocesan needs, i.e., £4,400, in addition to the interest received on the invested funds of the various Societies and annual subscriptions.

Of course we are well aware how great is the demand which the war taxes are making and will make upon incomes, and also how many urgent claims the war is making for voluntary contributions. But at the same time the war is teaching us more fully than we ever learnt it before the meaning of sacrifice, and it is probable that we are all more ready to give than we were a year ago.

Besides supporting the war, it is our serious duty to keep the fabric of our civilization and our religion going through the time of war, so that no needless impoverishment of our common life may result from it.

Therefore it is that we make bold to ask the Rural Deaneries to accept the same apportionment as last year, and we hope that the parishes will accept its share, to be raised by collections in Church or by other means: and we trust as well that our friends will keep up their subscriptions, so that the various Diocesan Societies may be able to carry on their work without any serious curtailment.

It will greatly assist the Treasurer, if the collections are made and forwarded to him as soon as possible and in any case before November 30th.

Signed on behalf of the Diocesan Board.
C. Oxon, President.
W.H. Ames, Hon. Treasurer.
Henry E. Trotter, Hon. Secretary.

The collections at Mattins and Evensong on Sunday, September 12th, will be given to this Fund. A budget is carefully prepared for the needs of the whole Diocese and each Deanery is asked to raise a certain amount towards it. The amount required from the Deanery is divided fairly among the parishes by a local Committee and WARGRAVE IS ASKED TO CONTRIBUTE £19 3s. 8d.

Last year we fell short of the amount asked from us, it is much to b hoped that we may provide our full quota for 1915. Those who are unable to attend Church on September 10th are invited to send their contributions to the Vicar or Churchwardens.

We are an Episcopal Church and this Fund is the one means through which we can recognise the financial claims of the Diocese to which we belong.

The Fund helps to train men for the ministry; it helps large and poor parishes to support their Clergy; it helps to improve poor livings; it helps to build and restore Churches; it helps to build and improve Church Day Schools; it helps to provide mission clergy and rescue and temperance workers in the Diocese.

Wargrave parish magazine, September 1915 (D/P145/28A/31)