Consolidation of the floating debt will become urgently necessary when peace has been concluded

Local government finances were set to be strained for years to come, thanks to the war.

CONVERSION OF PASTURE

The Committee have received notification from the Berks War Agricultural Executive Committee that certain of the Council’s pasture lands in the parishes of Stanford-in-the-Vale, Charney and Cholsey, scheduled for conversion, have now been transferred to category 4; the field at East Hanney has been placed in category 3.

LOANS

A letter has been received from the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries, on the subject of loans, stating that the board has been informed by the Treasury that the provision of capital from Government funds is likely to be impracticable both during the war and for some time after the conclusion of peace, and that any new issue of Local Loans Stock while war-borrowing is still going on or during the period of consolidation of the floating debt, which will become urgently necessary when peace has been concluded, must be regarded as out of the question.


Report of Smallholdings and Allotments Committee to Berkshire County Council, 27 April 1918 (C/CL/C1/1/21)

Advertisements

Every man, woman, and child should subscribe 1d. a day to help the King and the Country to beat the enemy and gain victory and a lasting, good peace

Cranbourne people were urged to contribute financially.

On the 1st of February the Munition Works, Spital, Windsor, War Savings Association completed the first year. As so many residents of Cranbourne and Winkfield are subscribers, it may interest them to hear that 14,353 sixpenny coupons have been collected during the year, representing a sum of £358 16s. 6d. paid into the Treasury, London, for war services. Members are urged to press and invite others to subscribe and support the good cause. Every man, woman, and child should subscribe 1d. a day or 6d. per week to help the King and the Country to beat the enemy and gain victory and a lasting, good peace. No one should hesitate, but join at once; and remember, every penny lent to the Government helps in the long run to win the war.

Mr. Lenoard Creasy, of Hurstleigh, Windosr Forest, will be glad to furnish all particulars to any one who wishes to subscribe to the National War Savings Fund.

Cranbourne section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, March 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/3)

“The nation generally has not yet realised the gravity of the situation”

Cranbourne people were encouraged to invest their savings in the war effort.

The Sunday School was crowded on Thursday, March 8th, when Mrs. Boyce gave a very vigorous address on “Food Saving.” She said that the nation generally had not yet realised the gravity of the situation, and the necessity for the control of food. We had suffered from want of foresight on the part of the Government, not merely during the early months of the War, but during the work and self-sacrifice of us who remain in the safety of our homes.

Our Sailors and Soldiers are doing their bit. We also have to do our bit by using as sparingly as possible all commodities that are sea-borne.

Mr. Creasy after spoke on the subject of war-savings.

It may interest residents of Cranbourne to know that a National War Savings Association has been started, and up to date 134 people have joined. Anyone may join, and a card is supplied. The subscriptions are paid by buying sixpenny coupons and affixing them to the cards. When a member has 31 sixpenny coupons on his card a War Savings Certificate will then be given in exchange for the completed card.

War Savings Certificates for 15/6 may, if desired, be purchased outright. The money paid by each person is sent at once to the Treasury, London, it is in fact money lent to the Government, who in return give generous terms. For 15/6 the Government agree in five years to give one pound sterling.

All the money collected is spent on the Army and Navy to provide men, ships, guns and munitions to terminate this great war.

The more money each individual leads the Government the sooner relations and friends will return to their homes and settle down to a peaceful life once more.

Cranbourne section of Winkfield District Magazine, April 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/4)

Netley is pressing for the removal of the insane German soldiers

The use of Broadmoor for insane PoWs (currently all at Netley Hospital in Southampton) was inching ever closer. Broadmoor’s Superintendent, Dr James Baker, wrote:

5th November 1916
Dear Simpson

Youn may wish to know that Colonel Aldren Turner called here last week at the instance of the War Office who are apparently waking up. I am under the impression Netley is pressing for the removal of the insane German soldiers. He was very satisfied with the accommodation. I told him it was too good for the purpose. I informed him all I required was a week’s notice to make a new entrance from the main road. I do not care to pull the wall about until things are definitely settled. I received a letter from him yesterday saying he had presented his report, that the question of orderlies was being put in hand, that Foulerton and I would probably get an outfit allowance of £20 (the usual allowance is £30) but as they have apparently conceded the principle, we shall not quarrel about the amount, which should suffice.

He added in his letter that he had meant to discuss the question of the reception of insane German Officers, but he had forgotten to mention it to me. This will be rather a difficult matter as one does not know whether it will entail extra expense and further financial negotiations. However if the matter comes up and you agree, I think I had better see the War Office people about it. Of course I told Colonel Turner we could not move here until Treasury sanction was obtained.

Yours very truly
[signature missing from file copy]

Broadmoor correspondence file (D/H14/A6/2/51)

“The War Office still cling to the view that a Criminal Lunatic Asylum is not good enough for a Bosch prisoner of war”

There was concern at the top that there might be some stigma attached to sending insane prisoners of war to Broadmoor, which normally only housed the criminally insane.

Home Office
Whitehall
SW

24th October 1916

Dear Baker

We have not yet got Treasury sanction for the use of the vacant block as a military hospital. It is really for [the] War Office to hurry up if they want it, not for us. I understood from Mr Sayer that neither you nor Dr Foulerton wish to wear uniform. I propose therefore when we get Treasury sanction and tell War Office they can get the block, to tell them also,

1. That the Secretary of State cannot ask you to supply yourselves with a uniform and assumes that they do not desire you to wear one. I have telephoned something to this effect already, but of course there seems to be more than one Department of War Office concerned and the question has to go the round!

2. That before they take possession they should send down someone to settle what clothing, crockery and cutlery will be required. Personally I should be inclined to deprecate the idea that anything marked “BCLA” is tabu. That may have been all very well at the beginning of the war, but we are long past that stage by now. If the War Office still cling to the view that a Criminal Lunatic Asylum is not good enough for a Bosch prisoner of war, I am inclined to think they should pay for it. What we offer is merely what we provide for present inmates…

I was very glad to hear from Mr Sayer that he believed all the staff at Broadmoor on whom new work will fall are most ready to do it without extra pay. He will probably have a good deal of trouble as well as you and Dr Foulerton, and it is very gratifying to find this is accepted so cheerfully.

Yours very truly,
H B Simpson

Broadmoor correspondence file (D/H14/A6/2/51)