“Our earnest approach to and intercession with God is the most powerful weapon we can use for the destruction of German oppression”

Churches in the Bracknell area joined in the commemoration of the war’s third aniversary.

Bracknell

THE WAR.

Special Services have been arranged for Sunday, August 5th, the anniversary of the commencement of the war. As we enter on the fourth year of this terrible conflict we shall greatly desire to come together to entreat God to give us His blessing, to crown our efforts with victory, and to give His mighty protection to our Sailors and Soldiers. Let us not be weary of praying. There will be special prayers at the Holy Communion and at Morning and Evening Prayer.


Winkfield

SPECIAL NOTICE.

On Sunday, August 5th, there will be special Services of Prayer and Intercession to mark the third anniversary of the War. There will be celebrations of Holy Communion at 8 at S. Mary the Less, and midday at the Parish Church. The preacher morning and evening will be Rev. Walter Weston, and the offertories will be given to the Missions to Seamen.

Warfield

MY DEAR FRIENDS AND PARISHIONERS.-

There is one thought that will fill our minds at the beginning of this month, the third anniversary of the war. The Archbishops have set forth a special set of Services for use on the 4th and 5th; and having the further approval of our own Bishop, they will be used in this parish on those days. On Saturday there will be a special celebration of Holy Communion at 7 o’clock and at 8 o’clock; matins at 10 and Evensong at 3p.m. There will further be an open air Service at 8 p.m. at the Cross Roads near the Brownlow Hall, with procession along the Street and back to the Hall. On Sunday the services will be at the usual hours with special lessons. I sincerely hope that every parishioner will make a point of seeking God’s help at this time in a real spirit of unity and brotherhood, remembering that our earnest approach to and intercession with God is the most powerful weapon we can use for the destruction of German oppression and support of our brothers fighting in foreign lands. When you have read this letter, at once make up your minds what you will do in this respect and resolve to carry it out. Should Saturday evening be wet, the service will be held at the same hour in the Parish Church. Let us all do our best for a Service of one heart and one mind.

Yours affectionately in Christ,

WALTER THACKERAY

Winkfield District Magazine, August 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/8)

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“If you feel satisfied, in all probability one has had too much”

Warfield churchgoers were encouraged to use Lent as a starting point for a restricted diet in the face of shortages.

VICAR’S LETTER.

MY DEAR FRIENDS AND PARISHIONERS,

I have been asked by the Secretary of the Ministry of Food to bring before my parishioners the imperative necessity of observing voluntarily the spirit and letter of Lord Devonport’s appeal. I urged this at the Morning and Evening Service last Sunday.

As loyal citizens you have been asked to save the country the enormous expense of using compulsion, which means the diversion of labour that could be more profitably employed in other directions. The Church during this season of Lent is calling us to self-control; some have always made a rule of restricting their diet in obedience to the laws of the Church on certain days and will not feel this restriction of food as other people may. We have to leave the table feeling unsatisfied, but that is an excellent thing to do. If you feel satisfied, in all probability one has had too much.

What a great thing it would be if England could accommodate herself to the present circumstances from loyalty rather than under compulsion. It is no excuse for anyone to excuse their excess because others exceed. If one man is a thief and robs his neighbour’s food, it does not make it right for others to do the like. Let us all try from our duty to God as well as our duty to our fellow man to keep under our bodies and bring them into subjection.

Yours faithfully in Christ,

WALTER THACKERAY.

* * *

As a result of a preliminary meeting in Bracknell on the subject of War Savings, a branch has been started in Warfield with its headquarters at the School. Mr. Brockbank is Hon. Secretary and Miss Leach Hon. Treasurer. It has already been doing good business. We wish to thank Lady Finlay for her encouragement of the children by giving eightpence towards the sum of 14/- saved.

Warfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, March 1917 (D/P151/28A./9/3

Pray and pray again yet more earnestly for the triumph of right over wrong

Warfield men were grateful for their Christmas gifts. Those serving in Mesopotamia (modern Iraq) were treated to plum puddings, while those in France got tobacco.

VICAR’S LETTER

MY DEAR FRIENDS AND PARISHIONERS,

I have received most grateful letters from nearly all our Warfield Soldiers and Sailors for the Christmas presents sent them by the parishioners, most of them reflecting great credit on the packers, as the cake appears to have arrived in a perfect condition, although no tins or boxes were used. I am giving you this issue a statement of accounts given to me by our treasurer, Miss Hardcastle. Only one parcel seems to have missed its destination and found its way back to me. They all seem to be looking forward to spending their next Christmas at home.

This makes me think of the national mission, and is result on the nation. What are its results on each of us personally? How far may each one of us be hindering its great accomplishment by lack of self consecration? How far is each one wilfully tying the hands of a loving God? Think of this, and pray and pray again yet more earnestly for the triumph of right over wrong, but let us all see to it that our hearts are right with God.

Yours affectionately in Christ,

WALTER THACKERAY

CHRISTMAS FUND FOR OUR SOLDIERS AND SAILORS.

At a public meeting on November 13th the following Committee was elected to make arrangements for the above: the Vicar, Messrs. H. Crocker, H. Lawrence, Mrs. Crailsham, Mrs. Dyer, Mrs. Thackeray and Miss Hardcastle (Treasurer). The total sum subscribed amounted to £25 3s. 7d., made up as follows:-

Balance from 1915 £3 2 0
Whist Drive 2 7 3
Dance 1 1 2
Subscriptions 17 4 8
Balance from Sir C. Brownlow’s
Testimonial 0 8 6

The total number of parcels sent was 107; Mesopotamia, Salonika, Egypt and India, 21; France, 42; Home Camps, 33; Navy, 11.

Contents of parcels for Mesopotamia etc: Socks and plum pudding and Warfield picture card.

For France and Navy: socks, cake, cocoa, chocolate, handkerchief, Warfield picture card and tobacco.

For Home camps: same as for France, except mittens instead of socks.

Total spent on parcels £19 5 5½
Postage 4 6 1½
Balance in hand 1 10 0
───────────
£25 3 7

Warfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, February 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/2)

War savings open to all

The Warfield CE School launched a war savings association.

6th February 1917

Today we are busy starting a Warfield war savings association. Letters are being sent to each house in the parish as follows.

We are forming a war savings association at the school and it is open to everybody.

The rules are as follows.

1. You can pay 6d or more each week.

2. When you have paid 15/6 you will receive a £1 certificate.

3. If you withdraw your money in one year you get 15/9 in two years 16/9 in three years 17/9 in four years 18/9 in five years 20/-

4. You can withdraw your money at any time. If unable to pay your 6d any week you can make it up another time.

5. The scholars will gladly bring your contributions and your card to me and I will act as secretary.

Lessons have been carefully given to all the scholars and we look forward to a successful association.

The vicar (the Rev. Thackeray) will be chairman. Miss Leach treasurer. Lady Finlay and Mr and Mrs Crailsham and Mrs Thackeray will be the committee.

Walter Brockbank – secretary.

Warfield CE School log book (C/EL26/3, p. 361)

The grip of influenza

The new scourge of flu was affecting fundraising for presents for the troops.

A dance was held at the Brownlow Hall on Wednesday, November 22nd, in aid of the Christmas Present Fund… The proceeds amounted to a little over £1. Our best thanks are due to Miss Mabel Bowyer for the ready way she came forward at a moment’s notice as pianist for the evening. The Vicar and Mrs. Thackeray, who generally undertake this part between them, were both held in the grip of influenza and were unable to be present. However, they sent to find a pianist from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. and no one could be found.

Warfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, December 1916 (D/P151/28A/12)

“Surely the Almighty God, does not intend this was to be just a hideous fracas, a bloody, drunken orgy”

Admiral David Beatty (1871-1936) was a leading naval officer.

THE VICAR’S LETTER

MY DEAR FRIENDS AND PARISHIONERS,

There is but one absorbing thought for us as members of the Church this month, that is, the National Mission. No one can doubt but that God has been very distinctly speaking to us as a nation since the war began in 1914. He speaks in order that we may act. An opportunity is seized or it is lost. What great results may flow from a choice rightly made? The entire Church, interpreting God’s message from this war, says to us now “Choose ye this day who ye will serve?” Some folk feel that God has never crossed their path. Some people don’t hear when they are spoken to. They are either deaf or inattentive. Let me conclude my letter with the words of no less a hero than Admiral Beatty, which claims the respect of every thoughtful man and woman.

“Surely the Almighty God, does not intend this was to be just a hideous fracas, a bloody, drunken orgy. There must be purpose in it all: improvement must be born of it. In what direction, France has shewn us the way. She has risen out of her ruined cities with her revived religion, which is most wonderful. Russia has been welded into a whole, and religion plays a paper part. England still remains to be taken out of the stupor of self-satisfaction and complacency in which her great and flourishing condition has steeped her; and until religious revival takes place at home, just so long will the war continue. When she can look out on the future with humbler eyes and a prayer on her lips then we can begin to count the days towards the end.”

I would specially commend to the serious thought of every reader the latter part beginning with the words of England. Let every man and woman do their bit.

Ever yours affectionately in Christ,

WALTER THACKERAY.

* * *

We desire to express our deep sympathy with Mr. and Mrs. Woodwards, also with Mr. and Mrs. Ferris in their recent bereavements on the battlefield.

Warfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, October 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/10)

“We doubt very much whether a German Zeppelin would find Warfield Church at night”

Warfield Church was another to install curtains at night, although they were sceptical of the actual risk.

VICAR’S LETTER.

MY DEAR FRIENDS AND PARISHIONERS,-

As there is much news this month, my letter must be short and of a very practical kind. We have, as you know, been compelled to darken our Churches or stop the evening Services. The latter I felt we could not do, as it would mean that a very large number who can only come once would be deprived of their opportunity of Sunday worship. We have therefore darkened the Church. The fixing of the curtains over the two west windows and the shades over the lamps have cost, roughly estimating, between £5 and £6. As soon as I receive the accounts I shall make my appeal in the Church. I am unwilling to make it a charge on the usual Church expenses, as special calls demand special efforts. I feel sure that you will agree with me that I have chosen the better plan. To lose the present evening congregation would be disastrous for the Church. We doubt very much whether a German Zeppelin would find Warfield Church at night, as English visitors have great difficulty in finding it by daylight! However let us be the first to obey orders.

Yours affectionately in Christ,

WALTER THACKERAY.

THE LATE FREDERICK EDWARD BYE.

We wish to convey our sympathy to Mrs. Bye and family on the loss of their son on the field of battle.

Warfield section of the Winkfield District Magazine, February 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/2)

“It is often more difficult to face oneself than to face the enemy”

The vicar of Warfield had some thoughts on the days following the Day of National Intercession.

VICAR’S LETTER.

MY DEAR FRIENDS AND PARISHIONERS,-

The New Year, by the wish of the King, is to begin with prayer, and a call has further been given by the Church through the Archbishops and Bishops. By the time this will be in your hands we shall, I hope, have used the days of humiliation, preparation and intercession to the best of our ability. Let us all see to it that we continue the year as we begin it.

All our Warfield men tell me when they return home what a great comfort it is to them as they constantly face death to feel that those they love at home are praying for them. Those who represent us on the battlefield have the first claim upon our prayers, but the nation at home still requires them. Holy Scripture reminds us how many a victory was lost by Israel, not because they were militarily weak, but because the nation had grievously offended God by their sins. It is often more difficult to face oneself than to face the enemy. May God give every one of us grace to face ourselves and to bring our wills into harmony with His Divine will.

Yours affectionately in Christ,

WALTER THACKERAY.

Warfield section of Winkfield District Monthly Magazine, January 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/1)

Three lives, full of promise, laid down for their country

The sad loss of three Warfield men prompted thoughts of how best to honour them.

VICAR’S LETTER

MY DEAR FRIENDS AND PARISHIONERS,

We have all felt that the present war has touched us as a parish more during the past month than before; three young lives, bright and full of promise, have been laid down for their King and Country. With pride for our nation, though with sorrow for our own personal loss, we shall remember the names of Philip Bowyer, John Chaney, and Albert Lovejoy. All trials of our faith are also calls from God. What more can we do? His is surely the thought that comes uppermost in our minds.

How many more will make a personal offer of themselves to their country in their memory? This is a question which I think all young men will seriously ask themselves if they have not done so already. Is God giving me a call? Am I faithfully answering it?

Again, are we making a great subject of prayer? Do we faithfully remember the noon-day bell, and the force of united prayer?

I daresay some of you may be thinking how can we commemorate the glorious deaths of our Warfield heroes. It occurred to me that we might erect a lofty Churchyard Cross, such as adorn many of our old country Churchyards, with the names and a suitable inscription upon its base. This would have to be entrusted to a competent Architect, and would stand as a lasting tribute to their heroism.

Ever yours affectionately in Christ,
WALTER THACKERAY.

Warfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/11)

“Our Belgian guests are earning some money now”

Churchgoers in Warfield continued to help out Belgian refugees, although the latter were beginning to be self supporting.

WARFIELD COMMITTEE OF BELGIAN REFUGEES.

This Committee met at the Vicarage on Monday, September 13th. It was decided that in the future there would only be a monthly collection for this fund, and that parishioners should be asked to give what they could afford. Although less money is required than heretofore, as our Belgian guests are earning some money now, we cannot as yet do without support. There are very many who give nothing whatever to their maintenance, and we hope they will now begin to give, no matter how little, to the monthly appeal.

WAR WORKING PARTY.

The Bracknell Committee has sanctioned the collections in Warfield for the above being devoted to the Warfield branch of workers. Henceforth the materials will not be supplied to the Bracknell Branch. Mrs. Thackeray will be glad to receive all subscriptions, however small, once a month from Warfield parishioners.

Warfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, October 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/10)

Willing workers from Warfield

One young woman from Warfield had volunteered as a nurse at the Front, while others were working at home.

Many of you will be interested to hear that Miss Kate Manning has now gone out as a Nurse with the Expeditionary Force; we must remember her also in our prayers.

NEEDS OF OUR FORCES.

At a meeting held in the Victoria Hall, Bracknell, on July 26th it was decided to have working parties to contribute to the needs of the Navy and Army and War Hospitals. Mrs. Fielden is kindly allowing them to be held at her house on Wednesdays and Fridays from 10 to 12.20 and 2 to 5. As some of “our willing workers” in Warfield felt that the time spent in walking to and from Bracknell might be better spent in making a sandbag, shirt, comforter, or sock, the Bracknell Committee have kindly consented to the Branch working party being held once a week at the Brownlow Hall. Mrs. Thackeray hopes to hold the first one on Thursday, August 5th, at 2.15. Tea at 2d. each towards expenses. All are welcome.

Warfield section of Winkfield District Monthly Magazine, August 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/8)

A year of horrors unimaginable, and the end not in sight

Across the county, the first anniversary of the declaration of war was solemnly commemorated with religious services.

At Mortimer West End, the services were dominated by the loss of two of its men who had given their lives.

Wednesday, August 4th, was the anniversary of the declaration of war by England, and we held a well-attended service in the evening of that day to pray about the past and the future. The service began with a Memorial for those who had fallen, remembering especially Captain Stephen Field, R.A.M.C., and Frank Goodchild, who went down on the “Good Hope.” Then we joined in intercession for our Rulers, our Army and Navy, and our Allies, the wounded and those tending them, and made an act of penitence for our national sins and shortcomings. The family of the late Captain Field has put up a memorial brass in the church bearing the following inscription:

“In loving memory of Captain Stephen Field, R.A.M.C., who died a prisoner in Germany, April 10th, 1915, aged 34. He was taken prisoner in the retreat from Mons while tending the wounded in a church. ‘Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.”

The later news which has come shows that the text was true of Captain Field up to the very last, as he laid down his life attending to typhus patients in camp in the midst of appalling conditions.

If any parents should be summoned to France to see a son dangerously wounded (which God grant may not occur) will they communicate at once with the Vicar, who will put them in touch with an organization which will make things easier for them?

At Stratfield Mortimer:
August 4th
The anniversary of the outbreak of war was observed by large congregations at all the services, 7.45 a.m., 2.30 and 7.30 p.m. There was no preaching, only hymns and prayers, but there was impressive evidence of a deep reality and earnestness. And this we hope to see maintained at the two week-day war services throughout the autumn. We should like to see at these weekly services more of parents and friends of Mortimer men who are now at the Front.

All Saints’, Dedworth, reported:

August 4th, the anniversary of the Declaration of War, was kept as a day of solemn Intercession. There was, as far as possible, continual Intercession throughout the day, and Services at different hours. We were glad to see so many were able to take their part at sometime of the day. We hope these days help to make us realize the tremendous need there is for all to intercede humbly every day to God for our nation, our friends, and our foes.

Nonconformists took part as well as Anglicans. Maidenhead Congregational Church announced the town’s nonconformists’ contributions to the day:

A YEAR OF WAR!
It is a whole year since the world’s peace was broken up, and horrors unimaginable before have become our daily meat. And the end is not yet in sight. There are those who prophesy that the end will be as sudden and unexpected as the beginning, and that Christmas will see us settled down once more in ways of peace. Whatever happens, we are convinced that the Allies will not lay down their arms until their warfare is accomplished, and they have lost no jot of their conviction that their chivalrous and Christian struggle on behalf of a great cause will be crowned with a complete and satisfying victory. But it may be that vast sacrifices lie before us, and for those we shall need more and more the continual succours of grace of God. Fortitude must be fed and supported by faith.

We urge upon all our friends the duty of earnest and constant prayer. We ought to pray in private as well as in public services, that our soldiers and generals may be strong, and our rulers wise. We ought to pray for the Church, that it may be rich in counsel, and that it may guide the people to a more solemn faith in God. And we shall need to pray for ourselves, that our faith may not fail, however great the burdens may be that it may be called upon to carry.

A united meeting of the Free Churches of the town for Thanksgiving and Intercession has been arranged to be held in the Congregational Church on Wednesday, August 4th, the Anniversary of the outbreak of war, at 7.30 p.m. Rev. G. Ellis (the new Primitive Methodist Minister) will preside, and a brief address will be given by the Rev. G. D. Mason. We hope the faith and gratitude of Maidenhead Nonconformists will suffice to bring them together in large numbers, and that we shall renew and enlarge our trust in a ruling and guiding Will. Let us not dwell too much on the past, but let us think of our duty now, and let us set our hearts right before Him. When the nation is on its knees, the victory will arrive.

The minister of Broad Street Congregational Church in Reading, whose instincts were opposed to war in general, was less thrilled by the commemorations, although he allowed his congregation to take part in the town’s services.

Wednesday August 4th will see the first anniversary of the outbreak of the Great War. War is not a thing that we rejoice in. Rather do we deplore the necessity for such a dire calamity. But we are in it – righteously, as we believe – and, God helping us, we are determined to see it through to a victorious conclusion. That is the thought that is animating the vast majority of our countrymen at this time, and a demonstration to give it expression on August 4th is now being organised by the Mayor…

Personally I cannot say that I am enamoured of processions and demonstrations at such a time as this; but that is neither here nor there. The thing I do rejoice in is that the religious element is to be prominent in the proceedings, and I hope my friends will help to make it and keep it so. In this connection I desire to draw attention to the United Service (arranged by the Executive Committee of the Free Church Council) which is to be held in our church that day at 5 p.m. Several of the Free Church ministers of the town will take part, and our organist and choir have promised their help. I trust we may see the church crowded for that service.

St John’s Church in Reading reported its own services and the interdenominational town ones:

Wednesday, August 4th, the anniversary of the Declaration of War, was observed among us principally as an occasion for earnest intercession. We began the day with a Celebration of Holy Communion at 5.30 a.m., at which there were 31 communicants, most of whom were on their way to work. At 10.30 a.m. we had a second Celebration, with an address by the Vicar. The hour of this service was fixed with a view to giving mothers an opportunity to come and pray for their sons at the Lord’s own service, and the number that came shewed how greatly they valued the opportunity. It was indeed a wonderful service, and will live long in the memories of those privileged to take part in it.

Later in the day, after Evensong in St Laurence’s Church, attended by the Mayor and Corporation, there was a great procession, in which all the public bodies in the town were represented, ending up with a demonstration in the Market Place, at which, after a short religious service, stirring addresses were delivered by Bishop Boyd-Carpenter and the Lord Chief Justice. St John’s Church was open from 8.30 onwards, and we ended the day with Family Prayers in Church, at which a large number of worshippers were present, thus ending the day as we had begun it – in prayer.

Churches in the Winkfield area also commemorated the anniversary of the war’s start.

ASCOT

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 4th, the Anniversary of the Declaration of War, was observed in our Church, as in almost every Church throughout the land, as a day of Intercession before Almighty God in the spirit of deep penitence and true humility. We are thankful to be able to say that the chain of intercession was never allowed to be broken throughout the whole day. The great service of intercession, the Holy Eucharist, was offered at 8 a.m. and at 10.30 a.m.; and some of the grand old Offices of the Church were said: Sext, None, and Compline. The large attendance at all the services was something to be thankful for. It proved that our people have a sincere belief in the power of intercessory prayer and are willing to make an effort to do at least this much for our soldiers and sailors. But it also proved that mane more might, by a little sacrifice in the re-arrangement of their time, attend the Intercession Service which is held every Wednesday evening at 8 p.m. “Orare est laborare” – “to pray is to work,” and intercession for our men is a very important work in which we can all do our share, if we will.

CRANBOURNE

We were very unfortunate as regards the weather in our open air services of Intercession, four of them had to be abandoned owing to the rain. The Intercessions Services on the Anniversary of the Declaration of War were very well attended.

WINKFIELD

The special Services on August 4th were well attended, especially in the evening when we had a full Church; and the congregations were also large on the Sunday following. The anthem, “Lord for thy tender mercies sake,” being well rendered on both morning and evening.

Our thanks are due to the members of the C.E.M.S., who distributed notices of these services, which work was especially valuable in view of the notices in the Magazine being somewhat belated owing to its late issue this month.

Second Lieutenant Wilfred Loyd has just gone to the Front and will we trust be remembered in our prayers.

We are glad to be able to add two more names, Jack Dear and James Winnen to the list of Winkfield men serving, which was printed last month.

We regret to learn that Private R. Nickless has been wounded after having been at the Front only a few days. He has undergone an operation as is now progressing favourably.

The Vicar has sent a copy of the August Magazine to every man whose name is on the list published in that number.

WARFIELD

WAR ANNIVERSARY.- On August 4th there were two early celebrations of Holy Communion at 6.30 and 8, and though a week-day there were thirty communicants. The best attended service however was the open-air service held at Newell Green at 7 p.m. The Choir vested at the Brownlow Hall and preceded by the Processional Cross and followed by the Warfield Scouts made their way to the Cross Roads, where the service was begun by the singing of the National Anthem, followed by a short address by the Vicar on penitence and prayer, after which the hymn “Lord teach us how to pray aright,” was sung; prayers were offered for every Warfield belligerent by name.

The Vicar then asked all present to come up to the Church and to walk in couples and maintain strict silence while Church Litany was recited in procession. Just before reaching the Church the old Hundredth was sung; the service in Church was that sanctioned for use on the first Sunday in the year. The congregation which came in the procession numbered about three hundred. We thank God for His good hand upon us and for the great number whose hearts were touched and whose lips were opened on this solemn day.

The vicar of Warfield planned an open air service to commemorate the first anniversary of the war’s start.

THE VICAR’S LETTER.

MY DEAR FRIENDS AND PARISHIONERS,

Wednesday, August 4th, ought to be a very solemn day for all of us this year, being as you know the Anniversary of the Declaration of War. A great example is being set to us all on that day by our King and Queen Mary by their intention to be present at a solemn Service of Intercession in St. Paul’s Cathedral at noon. What are we going to do? Let the King be represented by all his subjects in Warfield, and St. Paul’s represented by our own Parish Church. The hour of noon be substituted by 7 p.m. Let us have a united open-air service at the Crossways at Newell Green. The National Anthem will be sung, a short address will be given. All our village soldiers will be prayed for by name. The Litany will be recited on our way to Church, where the service will conclude with the special service used on the first Sunday of this year. The Holy Communion will be celebrated that morning at 6.30 and 8.

Anyone who is absent on such an evening I should feel was ashamed of his country, and deserved no blessing from God. Let us all be united about it, and come not in tens but in hundreds and not be afraid to confess the mighty working of God in our midst. This can be done and I want you all to say that it must be done. Let us confess our God and cry mightily to Him. I ask every parishioner to do his or her utmost to bring their neighbours. London has set us all an example, let the country do her part, and may God lift up your hearts to seek His great and abundant blessings in the coming year.

Yours affectionately in Christ,
WALTER THACKERAY.

More privately, the Community of St John Baptist held its own services at the House of Mercy, Clewer.

4 August 1915
Anniversary of our declaration of war with Germany. The Penitents were present at the 7 a.m. Eucharist. War Litany was said by one of the priests at 12; & at Evensong there were special prayers, hymns, & the National Anthem.

Florence Vansittart Neale went with a friend to attend the big national service at St Paul’s.

4 August 1915
Up by early train with Mary Hine to London for the service at St Paul’s! 1st year of war over! Long wait. Nice service. Artillery band. Royalties there. Over by 1. We missed 2 o’clock train so had lunch, came down 3.45. Church after.

Bubs’ men had motor drive & tea at Henley.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, September 1915 (D/P120/28A/14); Clewer parish magazine, September 1915 (D/P39/28A/9); Maidenhead Congregational Church magazine, August 1915 (D/N33/12/1/5); Broad Street Congregational Church magazine, August 1915 (D/N11/12/1/14); Reading St John parish magazine, September 1915 (D/P172/28A/24); Winkfield District Monthly Magazine, August 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/8); CSJB Annals (D/EX1675/1/14/5); Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale (D/EX73/3/17/8)

Belgians mow and reap the hay

As Warfield men went to war, Belgian refugees helped to take on some of the work at home.

C.E.M.S.

Mr. Hammond, Junr., Secretary of the Wokingham Federation, was the recipient of a silver tray from the members of the branches in the Federation, on the occasion of his marriage on June 12th, and also of his resignation as Secretary, has now got a commission in the New Army. His place has been taken, at any rate for the present, by Mr. C. Jones, Moor Cottage, Binfield. Warfield was represented at the Slough Conference of the C.E.M.S. by the Vicar (Branch President), Mr. Brockbank (Branch Secretary), and Mr. H. Parks (Delegate of the Branch). We were very sorry that our other Delegate, Sir William Herschel, was unavoidably prevented from attending.

Some of our own Branch have been very helpful in a practical way, coming in the evening to mow and reap the hay in the Churchyard. Our biggest thanks are due to Messrs. G. Higgs, G. Lewis, H. Parks, Probyn, and B. Peat, also to the other non-members, L. Bristow, Chaney, Dyer, J. Lewis, our Belgian Guests Messrs. Taes and van der Voorde, also to Mrs. Thackeray and Mrs. Parks for their assistance.

Warfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, July 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/5)

It is in no sense a normal year

The vicar of Warfield wrote to his parishioners thanking them for their generosity despite the economic impact of the war, and urging the to join in intercessory prayers.

VICAR’S LETTER

MY DEAR FRIENDS AND PARISHIONERS,

My first words to you this month must be words of generous thanks for the generous Easter offering you gave me amounting to £32. It has been and will be a year of expense to us all, and I appreciate your offering all the more as it has meant a greater sacrifice in the giving. The Easter Services were all well attended, and allowing for the absence of those communicants who are away serving their country, our numbers though actually less were greater than last year. It is as we all know in no sense a normal year, but there is every reason for us all to be thankful for those mercies that are evident in this time of strain. In spite of a choir robbed of many of its members by the war, we kept up our standard of singing on Easter Day. The Good Friday Three Hours Service was conducted by the Rev. J. Frampton of Ascot Priory, whose devotional addresses were found most helpful. Let me ask you once again to make full use and opportunity of both private and public prayer on behalf of those at the war, especially turning your thoughts heavenward at the hour of noon.

Yours affectionately in Christ,
WALTER THACKERAY.

Warfield section of Winkfield District Magzine, May 1916 (D/P151/28A/7/5)

“We do not think it fair to replace those who have gone at their country’s call”

The choir at Warfield was suffering from the loss of many of its members to the armed forces.

VICAR’S LETTER
MY DEAR FRIENDS AND PARISHIONERS,-

I must add a few words of encouragement richly deserved by our Organist and Choir, now much depleted by the call of their country, for the hard work put into the Ascension Anthem, which was a portion of Spohr’s “Last Judgment” beginning at the passage “Come up hither,” and ending with the sublime but short chorus, “All glory to the Lamb that died.” The Whitsun Day Anthem, Goss’ “O taste and see,” though old to many parishes was new to us, required perseverance and work. Attwood’s “Come Holy Ghost” was sung at 11 o’clock. We do not think it fair to replace those who have gone at their country’s call, as we hope to have them back safe and sound to fill once more their places in the House of God.

Yours affectionately in Christ,
WALTER THACKERAY

Warfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, June 1915 (D/P151/28A/17/6)