“The precautions now being taken at Newbury are doubtless spreading consternation among our enemies”

St Nicolas’ Church in Newbury was insured against potential air raid damage.

Unusual darkness having been imposed upon us, on account of the danger of Zeppelins, the time of evensong at the Parish Church has been altered to 5.30, but we hope that this will make no difference to the attendance at the Service: the parishioners will also have the opportunity of spending a longer Sunday evening at home, an opportunity not to be despised. Our readers will be glad to know that the Churchwardens, with their usual forethought, have specially insured the Church against the danger of aerial attack, this insurance involving the additional expenditure of £34. Dark blinds are being made for the Parish Room, so that the usual evening meetings, etc, may be held there, and we hope to be spared the attention of the Police. The precautions now being taken at Newbury are doubtless spreading consternation among our enemies.

We desire to offer our sincerest sympathy to the Rev. H C Roberts, who has lost a brother at the War, and also to Mrs Walter Lawrence on the death of her husband, and to his mother and relations. Sergeant Major Lawrence had done a great deal in Newbury for the Volunteer movement, and letters received by his widow from officers with whom he had served bring out his splendid soldierly qualities, keen patriotism, and unfailing cheerfulness: greatly though we regret his loss, we are truly thankful for examples such as his.

The Rev. F Streatfeild is returning home from the Front for a well-earned week’s rest.

Newbury parish magazine, March 1916 (D/P89/28A/13)

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“Our fear of the Censor forbids us saying what he has done”

There was good news about some of the Newbury men in the armed forces.

A new departure has been made at the close of the Sunday evening service, in reading out the names of those who are entered on the Intercession List in the Church. Owing to the number of names, the list is being divided into about four parts, and thus should be completed during the month. May we once more remind the parishioners that we have prayers for the war twice daily, and sometimes more, and also that the Great Service where they can specially find Help for themselves in trouble or anxiety, and where they can best pray for their absent friends, is the Service of the Holy Communion.

Another room is being opened, this time in St John’s Parish, as a recreation room for wounded soldiers at the Hospital, an institution which was much needed. The old Boys’ British School has been lent by the Local Education Authority, and the Hon. Secretary, Mr Harrison, writes to appeal for donations, writing materials, books, magazines, papers, tables, sofas, easy chairs, screens, cards and games.

Major B J Majendie, KRRC, has been promoted to the rank of temporary Lieut-Colonel, and given command of the 12th Battalion of the Hampshire Regiment.

Lance-Corporal Charles Crossman is a prisoner of war in the hands of the Germans. We are sorry for him in his incarceration, but we should have been still more sorry if he had been killed, as there was some fear of for some days. Mr Crossman has been a steadfast member of the CEMS and a most useful Sunday School teacher, and we should have missed him very much in either capacity.

One of our old choir boys, Gordon Burgess, formerly in the Merchant Service, and now in the Royal Navy, has been distinguishing himself. Our fear of the Censor forbids us saying what he has done, but a large German Flag and a message of congratulation from the Admiral, which Mrs Burgess now possesses, go to prove that he has been making himself very useful to his country on the sea.

The Rev. F Streatfeild has been home on leave from the Front, and, we are glad to know, is in good health.

Newbury parish magazine, November 1915 (D/P89/28A/13)

A privilege much appreciated at the Front

Frank Streatfeild, an Anglican clergyman who had been living in Newbury, became an army chaplain in 1914. He was with the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry in France.

The Rev. Frank Streatfeild has courageously gone to the Front as Chaplain to the Forces, and we hope his friends in Newbury will remember him in his new and responsible work. The Rector received an interesting letter from him, describing among other things an open-air Communion service, where all the Communicants were men, and it is evident that the privilege is much appreciated at the Front. It will be remembered that a former Newbury curate, the Rev. F A Hill, is also out with the men.

The energetic ladies have opened St George’s Mission Room on week-day evenings as a Club for Soldiers. A considerable number have made use of the Room and have found there games, writing paper, music and refreshments. One evening a Whist Drive was held which the men – and the ladies – much enjoyed. Some male help would be appreciated with the Club.

In answer to an appeal for the wounded from the Dardanelles in the Hospitals at Malta, where Dr Heywood is working, the following generous response was made:

Given by members of the Newbury Parish and Donnington Square Red Cros Work Parties and by Anon: Miss A Boyce, Mr Bragg, Miss Cotton, Mr H Davis, Miss Davis, Miss Etty, Rev. W S and Mrs Edgell, Mr and Mrs J Morgan Ellis, Mr Harrison, Mrs J H Hopson, Misses Harrison, Miss A Hoad, Mrs Howard, Mr Josselyn, Rev. and Mrs L R Majendie, Mrs Milward, Mrs Pettican, Mrs Plows, Mrs B Pinniger, Rev. H G Rogers, Misses Sperring, Miss Watts, Mrs Wellock.

3 pairs sheets, 13 pillowcases, 21 Towels, 16 table napkins, 6 pairs pyjamas, 11 cotton shirts, 14 pairs socks, 4 handkerchiefs, 20 holland bags, 12 jig-saw puzzles, 1 book, 2 boxes cigarettes, 2 india-rubber hot water bottles, 3 hot water bottle covers, 11 pieces toilet soap, 2 Price’s service boxes, 2 yards macintosh sheeting, 2 yards jaconet, 4 lbs cotton wool, 6 lbs lint, 1 lb boracic lint, 5 dozen bandages, 4 boxes rubber plaster.


Newbury parish magazine, August 1915 (D/P89/28A/13)