He “saved an officer’s life by carrying him on his back out of danger, under fire”

There was news of many Burghfield men, some of whom had performed acts of heroism at the front.

Honours and Promotions

We congratulate 2nd Lt Wheeler and his parents Mr and Mrs E C Wheeler on his promotion, he having been given a commission in the King’s Liverpool Regiment. His brother, T Wheeler, is now training as a Pilot in No 5 Cadet Wing, RFC. Cadet (ex Corporal) Alfred Searies is training in Scotland, having been recommended for a commission. He has been twice wounded, and has saved an officer’s life by carrying him on his back out of danger, under fire. The following are now Sergeants: E Cooke (5th R W Surrey), R J Turfrey (ASC< MT), E Wise (2/4th Royal Berks).


E N Pike (killed in action), P C Layley (scalded), J Cummings, A Newman, and A Ware (wounded). W Butler, whose parents long lived in the parish, but have lately gone to Sulhamstead, is also wounded.


Jos. West, ex 2nd Rifle Brigade (wounds); Herbert C Layley, ex 5th Royal Berks (wounds); Fred W Johnson, ex 2nd Royal Berks (heart); Isaac Slade, ex 4th Royal Berks and RE (heart); J D Whitburn, ex Royal Berks (rheumatism), just moved to Five Oaken. Arthur L Collins, in last magazine, should have been described as ex 5th Royal Berks.

Other War Items

Lieutenant Francis E Foster, RNVR, of Highwoods, who since the outbreak of war has been looking for trouble in the North Sea, has been rewarded by transfer to a quieter job further south, for the present. Lieutenant Geoffrey H B Chance, MG Corps (of the Shrubberies) is in hospital in Egypt, suffering from malaria.

Roll of Honour
Mr Willink thanks all who have given him information. He is always glad to receive more. It is difficult if not impossible, especially since the Military Service Act, to keep the Roll up to date.

Obituary Notices

The following death is recorded with regret.

Mr E N Pike, of Burghfield Hatch, son of Mrs Pike of Brook House, lost his life as above stated, for his country on 11th November, less than a week after returning to the front from a month’s leave which had been granted him to enable him to get in his fruit crop. An officer in his Battery writes: “In the short time that Gunner Pike has been in the Battery we have learned to appreciate him not only for his work but for the man he was”. He leaves a young widow and a little boy. He had good hopes of obtaining a commission in time.

Burghfield parish magazine, December 1917 (D/EX725/4)


Promoting the economical use of foods

The Education Committee was at the forefront of war savings schemes locally. School were also to be used to promote changes in people’s habits with regards to food and cookery given the food shortages resulting from the war.

Report of Berks War Savings Committee

The War Savings Committee submit the following report of their work since the report to the July meeting of the Education Committee:

In accordance with the powers given to them on appointment, the following additional members have been co-opted:

Mr G F Slade
Mr T Skurray

During July and August last… Local Committees for War Savings came into being at Abingdon, Windsor and Maidenhead. Since that date, as a result of public meetings addressed by Miss Fraser of the National War Savings Committee and the Education Secretary, Local Committees have been started at Pangbourne, Thatcham, Newbury, Wallingford, Bracknell, Hungerford and Wokingham. Up to the 31 March, War Savings Associations have been established under the control of these Local Committees as follows:

Abingdon, with 6 Associations

Wallingford, 15 Associations

Pangbourne, 4 Associations

Hungerford, 7 Associations

Newbury, 15 Associations

Thatcham, 5 Associations

Wokingham, 13 Associations


Maidenhead, 32 Associations

Bracknell, 13 Associations

As a general rule, these local committees deal only with their immediate areas, but efforts are being made by the National War Savings Committee to secure the extension of their activities to the surrounding parishes; e.g. the Associations of Marcham and Moulsford are affiliated to the Abingdon and Wallingford Local Committees respectively, and the War Savings Associations at the Cookham, Alwyn Road Council School, and Clewer S. Stephen’s School are affiliated to the Maidenhead and Windsor Local Committees respectively, whilst the Earley CE School War Savings Association is affiliated to the Reading Central Committee.

The Associations in connexion with Windsor Castle and the Broadmoor Asylum are affiliated directly with the National Committee.

The number of War Savings Associations (in addition to the above) in the Rural Parishes formed up to the 31 March, is 56; at least one half of these are in connexion with the schools….

The average amount saved by each Association during the quarter January to March, 1917, is £217. These figures do not include the grouped Associations, and relate only to the smaller Rural Associations, where the opportunities to save are less than in the larger centres of population.

The Berks Teachers’ Association officials in January consented to help in the work, and have been successful in arousing and maintaining interest in the movement. Messrs Camburn, James and Fryer, in particular, have done most valuable service.

The National War Savings Committee have been invited by the Ministry of Food to assist in the Food Economy Campaign, and the Berks War Savings Committee have had before them the Central Committee’s suggestions for Local Authorities and War Savings Committees, and in conjunction with the School Management Sub-committee, they have approved the arrangements embodied in the following memorandum:


The Food Controller, in conjunction with the National War Savings Committee, has suggested that “Under the auspices of the Education Authorities a Conference might be called in every area with a view to enlisting the enthusiastic support and active help of teachers. In the case of ordinary schools, the children will form a means of securing the interest of the parents, and invitations to meetings and special classes can be issued through them. The Domestic Science teachers will be wanted to take charge of such classes.

After consultation with HM Inspector, the following preliminary Scheme has been drafted:

That the Instructresses be instructed to modify their syllabus with a view:

To promote the economical use of foods of which there is an available supply in the locality.

To prepare specimen menus for family use based on the above, with notes on the quantities required to give a proper diet.

To arrange to have the cooked meals on view after the lessons, so that the mothers can see them and ask questions.

To confer with the Head Teachers of the neighbouring schools as to the best way of spreading useful information among the parents of children not in attendance at the Centres, either by inviting visits which could be regarded as object lessons or by co-operating in drawing up a scheme for simple instruction in the schools.

It is to be noted that:

While it is important to keep the full record of all meals and their cost, it is not to be expected that the employment of substitutes will effect any substantial saving in cost, as the price of substitutes must rise as the standard foods become scarce.

It is most important to give guidance as to the feeding of children, as in some families there may be a tendency to reduce the food value of their meals.

Where milk is obtainable, it will be very useful to emphasise its uses in cookery.

It is hoped to hold a conference as soon as the Instructresses have drawn up their Scheme, and it is most important that the scheme should be prepared as soon as possible.

This Conference was held on the 20th April and the preliminary steps have been already taken to start work.

Report of Education Finance Sub-committee

The Sub-committee have arranged with certain employees on Military Service, who were receiving allowances from the Committee, to invest on their behalf part of their allowances in War Savings Certificates.

Reports to Berkshire Education Committee, 28 April 1917 (C/CL/C1/1/20)

“I think we must be winning”

Stanley Spencer missed the art world while serving as a medical orderly. The Raverats were French artist Jacques and his English wife Gwen, also an artist, and the grand daughter of Charles Darwin, who had been a fellow-student of Stanley and his brother Gilbert at the Slade. Their daughter Elisabeth was born in 1916.

Feb. 24th, 1917.

Dear Florence,

I do not know how many letters I owe you, but I will do my best. I got the Lond. Univ. Coll. Pro Patria and Union Magazine to-day which contained a lot of real interesting news about a lot of my old Slade friends.

I am aching and aching for a good book to read. Of course the boys have a few cheap novels, but I would rather waste my life away than read a sentence from one of these ‘books’.

Do tell me all about Mrs Raverat’s baby. Oh, what would I not give to see it. When I heard about it I laughed for sheer joy, and when the chaps in the tent asked me what I was laughing at I said “I don’t know; I think we must be winning.”

The photo of J.M.I. has not come yet, but I get mails everyday just now, so I expect it will be here soon. Much love to him and to you, Flongy dear.

From your loving brother


Letter from Stanley Spencer to Florence Image (D/EX801/20)

From wounded soldiers to a royal childbed

More men had joined up from Reading. The wonderfully named Frank Neon Reynolds (1895-1952) was a trainee doctor. He spent the war working on hospital ships. He later became a leading obstetrician, and helped at the delivery of the late Princess Margaret in 1930.

All Saint’s District

Roll of Honour
Charles Worrell Carrington, Reginald Thomas Dredge, John Graham Fraser, Frederick William Slade, Albert Emmanuel Slade, Cecil Stephenson Louth, Harold Robert Reynolds, Frank Neon Reynolds, Sidney Arthur Slade, George Victor Randall.

All Saints section of Reading St Mary parish magazine, June 1916 (D/P98/28A/13)

National responsibility for war damage

In 1916 towns hit hard by air raids were keen to get government compensation. Berkshire County Council (in a relatively safe part of the country) was unimpressed by these arguments and declined to join the activists.

5 February 1916

A communication from the Committee on War Damage inviting the Council to approve the following resolution:

That in the opinion of this meeting the Government Scheme for insuring against loss or damage by Air-craft and Bombardment, which has made individual citizens responsible for war damage inflicted on the, by the enemy, is manifestly unjust, and it is hereby agreed to present a Memorial to the Prime Minister urging the abandonment of the Scheme, and (1) the adoption of an Act recognising national responsibility somewhat on the lines of the Riot (Damage) Act, 1886, or (2) revert to the policy adopted in connection with the Zeppelin raids on the East Coast and the bombardment of Scarborough and Hartlepool prior to the introduction of the Insurance Scheme, and compensate sufferers out of national funds; a condition of the withdrawal to be that the premiums already paid under the Scheme should be returned.

Resolved on the motion of Mr Slade, seconded by Sir Cmaron Gull, bart: That no action be taken by the Council.

Berkshire County Council minutes (C/CL/C1/1/19)

Setting up a War Agricultural Committee for the county

Food shortages were a real concern during the war, as German attacks on neutral ships impeded imports. At its meeting on 16 October 1915, Berkshire County Council decided to set up a War Agricultural Committee.

A letter, dated 18 September, 1915, addressed to the Chairman of the Council by the President of the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries, forwarding a Scheme for the appointment of a War Agricultural Committee and district sub-committees, was considered.
The principal functions of the Committees will be to organise the supply of agricultural labour; to consider the maintenance of, and if possible, the increase in, the production of food; to obtain information as to the requirements and supply available of agricultural implements and fertilisers and feeding stuffs; and generally to assist and advise landowners, farmers, and labourers.

Proposed by the Chairman, seconded by Lord G M Pratt, and resolved: That the following, being representative of landowners, farmers, agricultural societies and institutions, labour and other persons, be appointed a War Agricultural Committee for the County of Berks in accordance with, and for the purposes enumerated in, the circular dated 18 September, 1915, from the Board of Agriculture; with power to add to their number:

F Anstey
F Bate
J H Benyon
W Brewer
William Cordell
F J K Cross
R Crow
P E Crutchley
Miss G Elliot
C A Ferard
J A Fereman
Aaron Frogley
E Gardner, MP
H Goddard
B C Heath
W J Henman
T Latham
A W Lawrence
Local Manager, Labour Exchange
Capt. F C Loder Symonds
Job Lousley
W A Mount, MP
W Pennington
Miss G Pott
A Robinson
T Rose
Frank Saunders
W Anker Simmons
T Skurray
G F Slade
F A Smith
Harry Wilson Sowdon
E M Sturges
T S Tayler
Rev F W Thoyts
W Weall
H W Weaving
H G Willink

Proposed by the Chairman, seconded by Mr Bate, and resolved:

That the Clerk of the Council be nominated, and authorised to act, as Clerk to the War Agricultural Committee for the County of Berks; and that such other members of the administrative staff of the Council, as may be available and required, be allowed to assist such Committee.

That the War Agricultural Committee be allowed the use of County Buildings and equipment free of cost.

Provided that the above authorisations are given on condition that the arrangements do not interfere with the ordinary work of the Council or their Committees.

BCC minutes (C/CL/C1/1/18)

“The Germans are murderers, not clean soldiers”

A selection of letters from Reading soldiers at the Front, in England, and in Egypt, which were printed in their home church’s magazine.

Letter From the Front. Come out and help.
When we are out of the trenches on a Sunday (like to-day) we have a short service which come as a luxury and which reminds me of old times when singing in the choir at S. Stephen’s. I had a scarf sent out to me by my sister which was made at the Girls’ Club, I understand, but it is very handy when we have nights out, which we often do, for it is very cold at nights. We have been out here practically eight weeks, and I suppose have seen as much of the trenches as any battalion out here during that short time. I never thought that when I went to see you when home on leave from Chelmsford that we should have been up in the firing line so quick as we were….

We are always thinking of all the friends and people we have left behind, and I know that you are thinking of us while we are away from everybody doing our bit. I hear that you call the names out on a Sunday and I know that there are quite a number, but I hope that before long that list will be twice as long, for the more men and young chaps we get out here the sooner it will end, and I am sure that we all want to see that as soon as possible.

Poisonous Gases.
Just at present we are having a very troublesome time with the Germans. They are trying their very hardest to break through and we have very hard work to keep them back because they are using those poisonous gases which is something terrible for our poor men, and you can’t do anything at all with them. I think myself that the Germans are murderers, not clean soldiers.
L.H. CROOK. (more…)

Let us, who remain in the safety of our homes, remember the many who need our prayers

The war was hitting home in Newbury, where a number of parishioners had been killed on active service.

The War Intercession List at the Parish Church now contains more than 170 names. Of these we much regret to record the loss of Henry Percy Ford, John Seymour, Eric Barnes, Alfred Henry Ellaway, Henry Samuel Slade, David Tumblety, William George Freemantle, Francis Leslie Allen, and Alexander Herbert Davis. Among the missing are Sidney Isaac Hughes and Arthur Neal junr., while John Hilliard, one of our servers, is wounded and a prisoner of war. Let us, who remain in the safety of our homes, remember the many who need our prayers, and be constant and instant in the duty and privilege of Intercession.

The number of men at the A.S.C. Church Parade has grown, and there are now 250 or more present. They have now made a long stay in Newbury, but it is probably that when they do go, it will be at very short notice. On Sunday, June 20th, they were addressed by the Rev. A.H. Haigh, and a collection was made for S. Andrew’s Waterside Church Mission.

An appeal was made in Church on Sunday, June 14th for the work of the Red Cross at Malta, where the wounded from the Dardanelles are sent. It is here that Dr. Heywood is stationed at present, and he has very hard and responsible work to do.

Church Lads’ Brigade
It is with the deepest regret that we record the death of Pte. Henry Samuel Slade and Pte. Francis Leslie Allen – the first of our members who have fallen fighting for their King and Country.

The following lads have joined H.M. Forces. No doubt there are others with whom the O.C. is not acquainted, and he would be pleased to hear of any additional names or corrections to the sub-joined list:-

H.S. Slade, F.L. Allen, Ptes. Atkins, W.C. Allen, A.G. Annettes, W.R. Bronsdon, Cleaves, W. Cooke, R. Haywood, E.E. Hill, T. Holley, S.W. Meagrow, W.J. Malder, F.J. Poffley, W.G. Pye, S. Rice, H.V. Tucker, W. Wiggins, W.G. Willis.

Next month we will try to give a more detailed list.

Newbury parish magazine, July 1915 (D/P89/28A/13)

Friends and relatives of the troops praying for those they love

The parish of Reading St John remembered its young men who had joined up:

The War

 The following names should be added to the list already published of young men connected with our parish who are now in training or at the front:-

A.G. Wing, Douglas George Pugh, M P Pugh, George Murley, Stephen Neate, Albert Neate, Walter Edward Scott, Giles Ayres, Albert Higgs, Murray Slade, Fred Wheeler, George Thompson, Fred Wiggins, Wm Bushnell, W Heath, S Higgs, W Martin, B Rolfe, Wm Shepherd.

Special Intercession will be made by name for all connected with our parish after the Evening Service on the Sunday before Christmas at both Churches.

Our week-day Advent Services will still keep their special character of Intercession Services, and the special subject to be thought of and prayed for will be announced each week. It is encouraging to see more relatives and friends of our soldiers coming to these Services to pray for those they love.

Reading St John parish magazine, December 1914 (D/P172/28A/23, p. 2)