Lavender Day

Ascot parishioners were asked to contribute lavender from their gardens in a novel fundaising idea.

The Parade Service of the R.A.F. now takes place in the Church at 9, instead of in the Cinema.

‘There will be a “Lavender Day” on July 20th in aid of the Five “Ascot” beds with the Scottish Women’s Hospitals in France, Corsica and Salonika, and the Berkshire War Prisoners’ Fund. Gifts of Lavender, fresh or dried, will be gratefully received by Miss Hanbury at Holmwood least a few Lavender bushes, and the smallest quantity will be welcome if sent promptly.

The Ascot Sailors and Soldiers Committee have been distributing the printed Cards, mentioned in our last issue, for relatives to post to men serving abroad. If any have not yet received a card in a stamped envelope ready to be addressed and sent along with an ordinary letter, they should apply at once to the member of the Committee in charge of their district as follows:

High Street – A.F. Bullock
H. Woods
London Road – H. Goswell
Fernbank Road – H.Tustin
Seinley and Priory Road – J. Skelton
New Road – H. Charman
A. Morton
Kennel Ride – A.Woods

Ascot section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, July 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/6)

Advertisements

Letters of thanks for Christmas parcels have begun to arrive from Egypt and Palestine

Soliders were gratefuul for their Christmas gifts.

Letters of thanks for Christmas parcels have begun to arrive from Egypt and Palestine. A H.Bullock, C. Williams, E. Webb, W. Boswell, W.B. Skelton, J.W. Howell have written expressing their thanks to the Committee and whose who made the Parcels Concert success.

Ascot section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, April 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/4)

Show that we appreciate what they are doing for us

Ascot parish worked hard to keep in touch with its men serving overseas.

ASCOT SAILORS’ AND SOLDIERS’ COMMITTEE.

This Committee, which was formed over two years ago, endeavours to keep in touch with all Ascot men serving in the Navy and Army abroad, and to show that we appreciate what they are doing for us. In order to keep the records up to date it is important that all information and changes of address relating to the men be at once communicated to any of the following members of the Committee.
High Street: A.F. Bullock, H. Woods. London Road: H. Goswell. Fern Park Road: A. Tustin. Swinley and Priory Road: J. Skelton. New Road: H. Charman, A. Morton. Kennel Ride: A. Woods.

We deeply regret the loss of Charles Sharpe and Victor Wye, killed in action, and our sympathy goes out to their relatives.

Mrs. Paxford and family wish to thank their kind neighbours and friends for their gift and sympathy in the great bereavement.

The following are reported wounded: E.H. Beasley, C. Everett, R. Strut.

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/11)

“What scenes our Ascot fellows are witnessing! And what adventures they will have to tell us of when they happily return!”

There was exciting news from some of the Ascot men serving at sea and in Egypt.

THE WAR.

The Ascot Sailors and Soldiers Committee report that they sent Easter cards to all the men abroad, and presents to all those who appeared likely to require them, the number sent being 27. They regret to say that no news has been received of the three Ascot men who have been reported missing for some time, though every effort has been made to trace them. They also report with much regret that three wounded men have been discharged from the Army. Four more men have gone out abroad this month, making the total on the list 101.

Signalman Tindal of H.M.S. “Undaunted” has been home on short leave and has given a graphic account of the action in the North Sea off the Danish Coast, in which his ship took a prominent part. For fear of the Censor we must not print all of what he told us, but we may say that the action took place in a high gale and that the rescue of all the “Medusa’s” crew was an exciting episode and carried out with great skill. The German destroyer rammed by the “Cleopatra” went down with all hands, and she sank so quickly that nothing could possibly be done to save them.

A very interesting letter from Trooper Skelton of the Berkshire Yeomanry has been received from Egypt by his parents. He took part in the recent round up of the “Senussi” tribe on the frontiers of Tripoli and also witnessed the release of the British prisoners in the hands of the Arabs. What scenes our Ascot fellows are witnessing! And what adventures they will have to tell us of when they happily return!

The Committee hope that they may be able to hold a Concert in May for the benefit of the Fund, as it requires some replenishing.

Ascot section of Winkfield District magazine, May 1916 (D/P151/28A/5)

Appeal to the obstinate hens

Ascot people supported their servicemen in various ways, including an appeal to increase giving of eggs for wounded soldiers – even if this meant what looks rather like cruelty to the hens.

ASCOT HOSPITAL EGG LEAGUE.
Eggs are needed, greatly needed for the patients at the Ascot Military Hospital. Former donors are once more asked to remember the wants of our wounded and invalided soldiers, fresh donors are appealed for. Eggs (dated), may be left, as formerly, every week (not later than Thursday evenings) at the depôts:- Mr. Taylor (Grocer), New Road, Mr. Skelton, Fernbank Road, Mr. Charlton (Baker), London Road, Mr. John Abbott, Course Road, and the Rectory. They may also be sent direct any day to the Hospital, where the Gate Orderly will receive them till the Hospital re-opens in March. Do not be put off by the obstinancy [sic] of your hens (as to laying eggs) if they turn a deaf ear to all your appeals, even on patriotic grounds. But keep a cabbage or such like savoury morsel tied up just out of reach. This is an appeal to their senses that seldom fails to make their beaks water, and to engender a constant jumping exercise most efficacious to an abundant production of eggs. It is specially suitable where the runs are small and consequently space is cramped. Names of fresh donors will be thankfully received by Miss La Trobe-Bateman, Ascot Rectory.

The Ascot Sailors and Soldiers Committee report that they have now on their list 92 Ascot men who are serving their Country either in the Navy, or in Regiments at the Front in France, or in the Mediterranean. As there are a good many more who are still on duty at home, this number will be considerably increased from time to time, and the Committee would be greatly obliged if information regarding those transferred to the Front may be given as soon as possible to any member of the Committee, or sent to Mr. Tottie at “Sherlocks.”

It has not so far been found necessary to send parcels to the men in a general way, as so much is being done for them from other sources, and it has been rather the aim of the Committee to ascertain the special needs, and to endeavour to satisfy them. In this way some 20 parcels of different articles were sent out at Christmas, and further parcels will be sent out as they appear to be required, and it is hoped shortly to send a present to each man at the Front from the “Boys of Ascot” as a result of their concert.

Correspondence with all those who wish it is being carried on, and many letters have been received, all showing that the men are in excellent spirits and health, and they are all glad to receive news of Ascot.

The Committee also wish to do anything they can to help the wives and families of men serving in any difficulties they may have arising out of the war, and they hope that they may be informed at once if assistance in any way is required.

A special fund is available for prisoners of war, but fortunately there are only two from Ascot.

Ascot section of Winkfield District Monthly Magazine, March 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/3)

“England is worth dying for” – and Winston Churchill is the devil on earth

Meg Meade let her brother Ralph know the details of the last moments of their cousin Ivar Campbell, together with news of various friends and relations – plus her very unflattering views of Winston Churchill. Ralph had political ambitions, and subsequently became a Conservative MP. The controversial Noel Pemberton Billing, mentioned here, had just won a by-election standing as an Independent, but his political career (perhaps fortunately) lasted only a few years.

March 16th [1916]
Peter[borough]

My darling Ralph

I hear Wisp is coming to London as he has six weeks leave, lucky thing, but the reason is he has had such a bad dose of flu he has lost a stone! Jim says lots of them have had it in the north. If it produced leave on that scale, & Jim doesn’t catch it, I shall have to send him a bottled germ of it!

I posted my last letter to you from London when I went up to see Arthur. He was looking very well indeed, he says the English soldiers have invented a sort of pidgeon French which is now used by the French soldiers to make themselves understood by the English & vice versa, & it’s frightfully difficult to understand. One day Arthur came out & found his servant looking up into his horse’s face & saying “Comprennie? Comprennie?” He said Frenchwomen always come to him about every conceivable thing, even to if they are going to have a baby, & one had highstrikes [sic] in his office the other day.

I hear that Bertie is convalescent on crutches now & they are trying to prevent his being sent home to England on account of his health.

Poor old Mrs Hopkinson came in here today, broken hearted; for Pen’s husband, Colonel Graeme, was killed in France last Friday behind the lines by a stray shell. Killed outright mercifully. But oh dear, how sad one is at these ceaseless sorrows, and all the broken hearted people all round one. “But England is worth dying for” as Noel Skelton wrote to Aunt Syb about Ivar. I dined with Aunt Syb the night I was in London. She is so wonderful, so is Joan, but it has told hard on both of them. Aunt S has aged & Joan carries the mark in her face too…

(more…)

Who will come forward?

The parish of Ascot was keenly concerned with remembering its men in service, while coping with their lack at home.

THE WAR.

We have the following records to make.

Pte. Frederick Waite of the 3rd Batt. Royal Fusiliers has fallen in the Service of his country. Lance Corporal Stanley writes:-

“He was killed in action on the 29th of last month, doing his duty for King and country. I lost the best man in my section, and he was liked by all the platoon. We buried him the same night with his head facing the Germans.”

Our deepest sympathy is given to the family, who reside in Course Road. R.I.P.

Thomas Hudson is missing.

Percy Huxford is a prisoner of war. He writes:

“I am wounded and a prisoner. I am wounded in the fore arm, but not very bad.”

Richard Taylor is prisoner of war. He writes brightly.

The following are wounded:-
Harold Matthews, Archibald Williams Grimmett, Jack Jones, Alfred Baker, Henry Edward Freeman, Arthur Everett, Leslie Henry Walls, George Faithful, Frederick Bettison, William Skelton, Harry Henley, Frederick Wye, E.J. Streater.

The list of our Ascot men at the Front is always read out in full at the service on Wednesdays at 8 p.m. We are extremely anxious that this list should be entirely accurate. A Box for “Communications about the War” is placed on the table at the West end of the Church, in which you are invited to place any additions or corrections that may be necessary from time to time.

* * *

WHO WILL COME FORWARD to fill vacancies that stare us in the face, owing to the demands which the war makes upon the time of many of our former Church workers? We very specially need one or two Lady communicants to undertake an hour or so’s work at the Church on Saturdays mornings. We imagine that the majority of our people have a very dim conception of all that is entailed, week by week, in the preparation of the Altar, Altar Linen, and Altar Flowers for the Sundays. Moreover the Brasses have to be cleaned. On Sunday last (October 23rd) one lady, and only one, had to undertake the entire work. This ought not to be possible.

Then, we sorely need Choirmen. Even if they have not very brilliant voices, they might come and do their best, and that is all that God asks for. It would rejoice the heart of Mr. Tustin, our painstaking but handicapped Choir Master.

Then, three more Alter Servers are asked for.

* * *

WAIFS AND STRAYS SOCIETY.
This admirable organisation is holding its Annual Sale of Work, on November 10th and 11th, at the Portman Rooms, Baker Street. It has under its charge the many children of Sailors and Soldiers. Lady Jellicoe and Lady French will be present at the sale. Contributions, requests for tickets, &c. should be addressed to the Central Bazaar Secretaries, Old Town Hall, Kennington Road, S.E.

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/11)

Many brave deeds

An officer with Bracknell connections had been praised in the national press for his role in fierce fighting in the Dardanelles before succumbing to his wounds, while ordinary soldiers from the town were wounded in the same battle.

THE WAR

All our readers will have read of the extremely gallant charge of the Berkshire Yeomanry in the recent fighting in the Dardanelles. The following account is from The Times.-

“When the order to charge was given, the Berkshire Yeomanry, although they had suffered many casualties, dashed into the enemy’s trenches, the first to reach them being Major E. S. Gooch, who was wounded in the head, and was defended with great gallantry by Second Lieutenant H. C. Blyde of Reading, who had followed close after him. After Major Gooch was wounded the Adjutant, Captain F. B. Hurndall, 20th Hussars, took over the command and showed excellent leadership. There were many brave deeds done by the rank and file…

The General commanding expressed to all ranks his intense appreciation of their conduct in this their first engagement and also commended the Brigade for reaching Hill 70 in spite of heavy casualties.”

Major Gooch, whose gallant conduct is thus mentioned, reached home, and was taken to Lady Riley’s Hospital in Carlton House Terrace. He was reported to be doing well, but to the intense sorrow of all in Bracknell he succumbed to his wound on September 21st. Though his home had been in Scotland since his marriage in 1902, he was often in Bracknell at his mother’s house, and we can well believe what we are told of the devotion that all in his regiment felt for him, and those who, like the writer of these lines, have had the privilege of knowing him in his Scotch home can testify that this devotion and affection was fully shared by his friends and neighbours there.

The casualties in the ranks of our Berkshire Yeomanry are also very heavy, and though no Bracknell man was killed, some of our neighbours in the villages round have fallen. Amongst those who were wounded, who have been admitted to hospitals at home or abroad, are Harry Adler, who has been severely bruised and shaken; W. B. Skelton, one of our postmen, who was wounded; as were also Lance-Corporal Howell and Sergeant Claude Spencer, both of whom were well known in Bracknell.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Magazine, October 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/10)