Permission for a brass tablet

On 27 June 1918, we heard that former school teacher Frederick George Sheldon had been killed. His old school did not forget him.

6th December 1918

Copy of letter:

Education Office, Blagrave St., Reading, 6th Dec. 1918.

Dear Sir, Your request for permission to place a brass tablet in the Hall of the George Palmer Sch. in memorial of the late Mr F.G.Sheldon is readily granted.

Yours truly,

Henry. F. Pugh, Clerk to the Committee.

Reading: George Palmer Boys’ School log book (89/SCH/8/1, p. 154)

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Killed by the explosion of a shell

A Reading teacher serving in the army was killed in what is now Iraq.

27th June 1918
Heard this morning from Mrs Sheldon that her husband Frederick George Sheldon (who was assistant in the old school in Southampton St. and subsequently in the George Palmer Boy’s School from its opening Oct 3rd 1907) had been killed by the explosion of a shell, whilst he was serving as acting sergeant in the A.O.C. Mesopotamia, on June 18th 1918.

Reading: George Palmer Boys’ School log book (89/SCH/8/1, p. 152)

An awful experience

Although Berkshire was spared the fear of air raids, many local people had friends and relatives ho were directly affected. A former District Nurse in Longworth, who had left the area on her marriage, shared her frightening experiences with her old friends.

We think the following extract from a letter from Mrs Poole, dated May 13, (better known to us as Nurse Dora Sheldon), will interest our readers. It is written from her home at Maldon.

“It was marvellous how we escaped the Zeppelin raid here as we did. The bombs were dropped so near us, and our drawing-room window was blown out and the bottom of a bath shared the same fate. It was an awful experience. And the nights are very nasty. The place has to be in absolute darkness; such a business to exclude every scrap of light.”

We congratulate Bombardier Richard Painton on his promotion to the rank of Sergeant.

Longworth parish magazine, July 1915 (D/P83/28A/10/7)