“Bits for the war”

Ascot people were active supporting some of our Allies undergoing the hardships of war.

ASCOT “LEAGUE OF PRAYER” (during the war.)

We very earnestly invite our people generally to join this League, and thus help bring down special blessing from GOD upon the Parish. Hitherto, except on Sundays, very few have been accustomed to enter GOD’S House at all. Some never enter it even on Sundays. HIS Sanctuary has been “put in coventry” during the week. Shall we, as one fruit of the National Mission,” change all this?

The Rule of the League is extremely simple, and is as follows.-
“I promise to go into the Church at least once a week between the hours of 7.30 a.m. and 7.30 p.m., and to spend at least 10 minutes in prayer or silent meditation before GOD.”

SERBIAN FLAG DAY.

Our readers, (so many of whom contributed, by their help and generosity towards the great success of the Serbian Flag Day on July 1st) will be delighted to hear that £150 was realized, after paying expenses. Of this the sum of £100 has been given to the Serbian Relief Fund and £50 to the continued upkeep of the “Ascot” Bed in the Hospital belonging to the Serbian Unit of the Scottish Women’s Hospital.

A remarkable feature of this day (due to the liberality and energy of the organisers) is the fact that expenses amounted to only a few shillings over £2. Kosobo [sic] Day, June 28th (the Serbian National Day), was kept in our Parish by special instructions in Serbia in our schools. On Sunday, July 2nd (Serbian Sunday), our gallant and suffering Allies were specially remembered at God’s Altar, and at all the other services, with addresses at Matins and at the Catechism Service. The Serbian National Anthem was sung at the conclusion of Matins and Evensong.

A COLLECTING BOX in aid of the Ascot Military Hospital is kept at the “Foresters’ Arms” Hotel by the kindness of Mr. Pendell. This was opened for the first time a short time ago, and its contents – £1 1s. 3½d. – forwarded to the institution named.

THE BOYS’ AND GIRLS’ SALE, in aid of the starving Belgian children (in Belgium itself) came off at the Ascot Schools on Saturday afternoon, July 22nd, from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

It was an enormous success, and is of exceptional value as bearing witness to the unselfish and very hard work of the boys and girls of our Schools, led by their teachers, and representing the most ambitious among many “bits for the war” that represent our “children’s war offerings” since the war itself began.

We will give a list of some of these “bits” in the September Magazine, as also a full account of the sale. For the present, it must suffice to state that the approximate profits of the sale amount to over £40, represented as follows:

Boys’ department … £13 0 0
Girls’ “ … 16 10 0
Infants’ “ … 11 7 0

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine, August 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/8)

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“It is appalling these awful losses, goodness knows where we find all the officers”

Two of Ralph Glyn’s fellow officers wrote to him with their opinions on the war.

June 20th [1916]
Dear Glyn

Very many thanks for your letter. I was very pleased to hear from you. Georgevitch has evidently done something to get himself into very hot water, I believe the question of decorations has something to do with it, anyhow he is absolutely shelved. You will have heard that a Colonel Nikolauivitch has been appointed Military Attache in London; it is just as well no one proposed Georgevitch for there, as he would have been refused. When they were discussing the question of who to send, they privately asked me & I suggested G, but was at once told that his name would not be entertained for a moment. I fear that there is nothing more that can be done for him. He got into trouble once before I understand over his treatment of his soldiers, & was for this reason only not with a battery in the Field Army.

It is appalling these awful losses, goodness knows where we find all the officers. Still one hopes on the whole the thing is going well though slowly.

I am glad to say I am better, though I have had a bit of [fun?] lately, everyone is having it too. [Hemlis?] & his division have left as you will have heard, most of them I believe going to help at Malta & elsewhere. The country is [illegible] fun from Typhus now, & there is a general air of cleanliness & sanitation about. All his troops practically are inoculated against Cholera.

My wife has been in the North all this time working up relief funds for Serbia, & has collected quite a lot of money; so anyhow you would not have had a chance of meeting her, thanks very much all the same. Things are very quiet here, but I am busy enough with wires & things the WO want. We were visited by 3 Austro-German aeroplanes the other day who dropped some bombs & made a lot of noise, but did not do much damage. We bagged one on its way back.
Wishing you the best of luck.

Yrs sincerely
Arthur Harrison

(more…)

Too busy with amputation for frostbite to make bandages

The hardworking bandage makers of Wargrave were pleased to find their work was appreciated by its recipients.

Surgical Dressing Emergency Society: Wargrave

Some of the letters received:

No. 4 Clearing Station Dardanelles Army
Dear Madam,

I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your letter and bales (9 bales) of Hospital Clothing and dressings with many thanks. Everything sent will be most useful out here.
A.W., Capt. R.A.M.C.

St ——– Hospital, Malta.
Dear Madam,

Would you kindly convey to your Committee and Branches how very much we appreciate the gift of 2 bales of dressings which arrived safely on Xmas Eve. They arrived at a time when we were so busy with amputation cases after frost bite, and have little or no time to cut or make dressings. Our very best thanks.
Believe me, yours gratefully, E.M. Matron.

Serbian Relief Fund
Dear Madam,

The parcels were called for (2 bales) and we beg to offer our very best thanks for the kind and generous gifts, which are most acceptable.
Yours truly, p.p. Mrs. Carrington White.

Croix Rouge Française
The London Committee of the Croix Rouge Française beg to acknowledge with sincere thanks having received from you 2 bales – they have been sent to Ambulance 116, Bataillon De Chasseurs à Pied Secteur Postal 179.

Chasseurs à Pied correspond with our Highlanders, men from the Highlands who fight in the mountains.

Another Hospital writes to say that a bale of comforts has not reached them. This is only the fourth bale that has not reached its destination. 18 bales have already been sent out this month. The 4th, 10th, 13th (Boulogne) and 24th British Ex. Force France General Hospitals, and the 2nd Canadian Casualty Clearing Station each got two bales, one of dressings and one of comforts, consisting mostly of pyjamas, flannel shirts and warm comforts.

The 5th, 10th and 14th Stationary Hospitals, British Ex. Force, France, and the 1st Canadian Stationary Hospital had 1 bale each containing comforts and dressings. 2 bales went to the Serbian Relief Fund, 2 bales to the French Red Cross.

The work of the Society is greatly increased since the dressings have been “Requisitioned”. But thanks to more help at home and the very excellent work of our Branches, we are going very well, and hope to be able to send an increased number of dressings and comforts to the Front.

Wargrave parish church magazine (D/P145/28A/31)

Cheery soldiers and Serbian relief

Residents of Crazies Hill in the parish of Wargrave supported fundraising for our allies in Serbia.

Crazies Hill Notes: Servian Relief Fund

On Wednesday, February 2, a concert was given in the Village Hall on behalf of the above Fund. The performers came from Henley and the programme was arranged by Mr. Chillman of 10, Market Place, Henley. It is interesting to note that Mr. Chillman is a native of Crazies Hill, having been born in our village where he spent the early years of his life.

The concert was a success from every point of view. There must have been close upon two hundred people present, and all seemed to thoroughly enjoy the different items as they were proceeded with. The front rows of seats were reserved for the patients of Parkwood Hospital, and the cheery presence of the soldiers added to the evening’s enjoyment. Although all the performers were amateurs the talent exhibited was above the average. The Pianoforte Solos were listened to with attention. The Recitations of a lady were greatly appreciated; and a Baritone Singer with an exceptionally good voice was deservedly encored. Also a great favourite with the audience was a Soprano Soloist, who was vigorously applauded and repeatedly encored. Of course the comic element was very welcome and met with the reception it undoubtedly deserved. ‘The Funny Man’ produced much laughter. We are very grateful to all the performers. The result of the concert, £3 16s. 11d. has been forwarded to the Treasurer of the Fund.

Concert at Crazies Hill Village Hall,
On February 2nd, 1916

£ s. d.
Sale of Tickets 2 14 11
Taken at door 1 6 6
Sale of Programmes 0 8 0

Total 4 9 5

Hire of Hall 0 5 0
Refreshments for Performers 0 5 0
Cleaner 0 2 6
Handed over to Serbians’ Fund 3 16 11

Total 4 9 5.

Wargrave parish church magazine, March 1916 (D/P145/28A/31)

Tins and money for Serbia

The people of Wrgrave gave generously in support of our hard pressed allies in Serbia.

Servian [sic] Relief Fund

The Collections at the Parish Church on Christmas Day Amounted to £15 2s. 6d.

Miss Rhodes acted as Secretary in Wargrave to assist Mrs. Noble in her collection of tinned foods. People were invited to bring contributions to the Parish Church on Sunday, January 23rd, and a great quantity of things was given:- Many pounds of Cocoa, Coffee, Tea, and Benger’s Food; Tins of Fish, Bacon, Sausages, Beef, Soup, Beans, Biscuits, and Cakes. And £1. 16s. in cash.

Wargrave parish magazine, February 1916 (D/P145/28A/31)

The children’s gift to the Serbian Relief Fund

Children who attended the Anglican Sunday School in Bracknell did get a Christmas party this year – but no entertainment other than a storyteller.

SUNDAY SCHOOL TEA.

This took place on January 4th, at the Victoria Hall. The tea seemed to be much enjoyed by the party of 220, who found the tables well supplied with cakes and bread and butter, arranged by the kind ladies who had undertaken to help. After tea crackers were handed round and caused much enjoyment. Then, while those helping were having their tea, Mr. Grant stood forth and told the children a capital fairy story which was listened to in quiet. A distribution of presents followed. In the classes of elder children, three or four in each class who had gained the highest number of marks received a small gift, while in the Infant classes each child was presented with a present.

The Vicar explained to the children that there was to be no entertainment, and the money that would otherwise have been spent on this was to be sent as the children’s gift to the Serbian Relief Fund. This announcement was received with applause. When “God Save the King” had been sung the children were dismissed, and as they left the Hall each child received an orange and some sweets, the kind gift of Mr. Western.

Bracknell section of the Winkfield District Magazine, February 1916 D/P151/28A/8/2

A masque for Serbian relief

An enterprising drama teacher put on a performance in aid of our suffering Serbian allies. To get an idea of the evening, here is the script of The Masque of the Two Strangers.

THE TOWN HALL, READING

MISS MARY HAY, A.L.A.M. ELOCUTION, ASSISTED BY HER PUPILS, Has much pleasure in announcing Two Dramatic Recitals of the “Masque of the Two Strangers” (by kind permission of Lady Alix Egerton), And Scenes found on incidents in Dante’s “Vita Nuova”, On Wednesday, October 20th, 1915 at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m., IN AID OF THE SERBIAN RELIEF FUND,
And under the distinguished patronage of

The Lord-Lieutenant of Berkshire and Mrs Benyon,
His Worship the Mayor of Reading
His Excellency Monsieur Creddo Miyatovich (Serbian Minister)
Mr. Henry Ainley
Lady Armstrong
The Rev. and Mrs Beloe
Mr. and Mrs. F. R. Benson
Mr. Acton Bond
The Principal of University College, Reading and Mrs. Childs
Mr. John L. Child
The Ven. Archdeacon of Berkshire and Mrs. Ducat
Mr. and Mrs. C. I. Evans
Mrs. Downing Fullerton
Countess Gurowska
Viscountess Hambleden
Miss Holmes
Miss Knighton
The Misses Lacy
Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Mackenzie
Lady Makins
Mrs. W. A. Mount
Mrs. Murdoch
Miss Musson
Mrs. G. W. Palmer
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Palmer
Miss Prebble
Mr. and Mrs. Rannie
Lord and Lady Reading
Mr. F. G. T. Rowecroft
The Rev. Gore Skipwith and Mrs. Skipwith
Mr. W. Stewart
Mrs. Tyser
Lady Wantage
Mrs. Waring
Miss White
Mrs. Leslie Wilson.

Doors open at 2.30 and 7.30 P.M.

Tickets: Afternoon Sofa Stalls, 4- Reserved Seats, 3/- Admission 2/-
Evening Sofa Stalls, 3/- Reserved Seats, 2/- Admission 1/-
Special Terms to Schools.

Box Office : – Attwells, Binfield & Co., 162 & 163 Friar Street, Reading. Telephone No. 11 .

Programme for recitals at Town Hall in Aid of Serbian Relief Fund, 1915 (D/EX1734/1)

Shirts for Serbia instead of Christmas presents

The people of Cookham Dean took an interest in the civilians of Serbia, who were suffering badly from living in a warzone, as the April 1915 edition of the parish magazine reveals, with the children giving up their Christmas treat:

The League of Honour
The Lantern Lecture on The War, illustrated by slides kindly lent by the Central Committee in London, was well attended and most attentively listened to. As no special lecturer could be sent by the London committee, the vicar himself gave the lecture, being very kindly assisted at the lantern by Mr H Edwards. After paying for the carriage of the slides on their return journey, a sum of 18/- remained out of the admission money, and was given to the Relief of Serbia.

A parcel of twelve well made flannel shirts has been sent as a first instalment of our gift to the Serbian Relief Fund. The flannel was purchased with the money which would otherwise have been spent at Christmas on the Children’s Sunday School Treat presents, and skilful and willing hands made up the material. A second instalment will be forwarded shortly. The Vicar received the following acknowledgement of the gift on March 26th- ‘The Committee of the Serbian Relief Fund beg to express their thanks to the Rev. H. F. Hunt very warmly for the parcel received on March 25th containing gifts from his parish.

Cookham Dean parish magazine, April 1915 (D/P43B/28A/11)

‘Misery, brutality and wickedness’: Lantern slides will bring home the awful reality of the war

The people of Cookham Dean were informed about the war by means of an illustrated talk. The vicar wrote in the parish magazine with his views on how this should energise people’s responses:

Mrs Hunt has been at some trouble to arrange a Lantern Lecture, in connection with The League of Honour, on the subject of The War… It is open, of course, to all comers, but I distinctly wish it to be understood that it is not an ordinary Entertainment. The Lecture, and the pictures that will be shown, should bring home to people in this village the awful reality of the War, and God’s infinite mercy to our country in having so far preserved us from the misery, brutality and wickedness to which so many of our Belgian and French Allies have been subjected. It will be seen that the Lecture is intended to stir up people to their religious duties in connection with the War, to summon the careless and indifferent to prayer, and to give deeper earnestness and reality to the prayers of those who do pray; and I shall be very disappointed if the lecture does not help us in these ways. It is sad to see how little trouble even some of those who have husbands, brothers, sons at the Front, will take to come to our Intercession Services, whether held on a Sunday or a week day. A nominal charge will be made for admission to the lecture, and the proceeds after paying expenses will be given to the Serbian Relief Fund.

Cookham Dean parish magazine, March 1915 (D/P43B/28A/11)