Simplicity, with enjoyment for all

Peace celebrations at Remenham were a glorified sports day.

REMENHAM PEACE CELEBRATIONS

Simplicity, with enjoyment for all, was the keynote of the Remenham Peace Celebration which took place, by the kind permission of Captain Eric Noble, at Park Place on Saturday afternoon, August 2. The funds had been provided by subscriptions given by a few ladies and gentlemen and the arrangements were carried out by Captain and Mrs Eric Noble, Captain and Mrs Eveleigh, and Mr Ansell, with Mr W Baker as hon. sec. The Band of the Henley Branch of the Comrades of the Great War was engaged for the occasion and discoursed a pleasing programme of music during the afternoon under the conductorship of Mr S Sheppard. A capital programme of sports had been arranged with Captain Eveleigh as handicapper and starter and Captain Eric Noble, Mr Ansell and Mr Baker as judges. Some valuable prizes were offered and the results were as follows:

50 yards handicap, boys 10 years old and under – 1st, G Gibbons; 2nd W Dixon; 3rd, A Moring.
50 yards handicap, girls 10 years old and under – 1st, Iris Humphrey; 2nd, Irene Ward; 3rd, Madge Langford.
100 yards handicap, boys over 10 years old – 1st, George Andrews; 2nd, Ronald Eustace; 3rd, Tony Christopher.
100 yards handicap, girls over 10 years old – 1st, Edith Rowe; 2nd, Phyllis Bonner; 3rd, Stella Dixon.
100 yards needle and thread race, boys and girls over 10 years – 1st, Elsie Fasenidge and George Smith; 2nd, Stella Dixon and Richard Gibbons; 3rd, Kathleen Ward and Ronald Eustace.
50 yards boot and shoe race, boys over 10 years – 1st, Ronald Eustace; 2nd, Richard Gibbons; 3rd, fred Smith.
Potato race, girls over 10 years – 1st, Olive Green; 2nd, Stella Dixon; 3rd, Ethel Stevens.
Sack race, boys – 1st, Albert Moring; 2nd, George Smith; 3rd, Richard Gibbons.
Egg and spoon race, girls – 1st, Annie Butler; 2nd, Stella Dixon; 3rd, Marjory King.
100 yards handicap, bandsmen’s race – 1st, A Why; 2nd, H Why; 3rd, R Cook.
120 yards handicap, men of the parish – 1st, Mr P Simmons, who gave up his prize to the second man W Eustace; Colonel Burnell took second honours and P Clarke, third.
50 yards egg and spoon race, women of the parish – 1st, Miss Froud; 2nd, Miss Marcham; 3rd, Miss King.

The prizes were kindly distributed by Mrs Eric Noble, who, on the proposition of Colonel Burnell, was accorded hearty cheers.

Tea was provided for the children and adults in the coach house, who greatly enjoyed the appetising meal. Amongst those present, in addition to Captain and Mrs Noble, were Mrs Heatley Noble, Mrs Goodrich, the Rector, Captain and Mrs Eveleigh, Colonel and Mrs Burnell, Captain A R Brakspear, Mr and Mrs Philip Simmons, Mr Stanton and many others. After tea, the school children who had been excellently trained by their head mistress (Miss Gale) rendered a special patriotic song, which gave much pleasure. Each child also received a Peace mug. Mr Baker proposed a hearty vote of thanks to the donors of the tea, and the subscribers, and to Captain and Mrs Noble and Captain and Mrs Eveleigh, for the trouble they had taken in making the arrangements. The proposition met with a most cordial response. Games of various descriptions and dancing were afterwards indulged in, and the happy occasion was brought to a conclusion by the singing of the National Anthem led by the band, cheers for Captain and Mr Noble, Mr and Mrs Heatley Noble, the Band, and all who had helped to promote the success of the occasion.

The Henley Standard.

Remenham parish magazine, September 1919 (D/P99/28A/5)

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A marvellous escape from an airship crash

Broad Street Church kept in contact with all its men who had joined up.

News has now been received from Air-Mechanic Fred W. Warman to the effect that he is interned at Croningen in Holland. He was acting as wireless-operator in the air-ship which came down there, and had a marvellous escape. We are glad to know that he writes in a bright and cheerful strain, and that he is trying to make the best of things.

Flight Sub-Lieut W. R. Taper of the RNAS has been appointed for duty in Malta. It has been a pleasure to see him frequently in our midst in recent weeks. The good wishes of many friends at Broad Street will go with him as he takes up his new duties.

BROTHERHOOD NOTES

Brother Woolley has consented to continue his good services by acting as correspondent with our members on service. This [is] a quiet piece of work which is bound to have its good results when things are normal again.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR

The list of our men who have responded to the call of God and King and Country. (more…)

“The knowledge that one was lessening the incredible sufferings and hardships our soldiers and sailors were hourly undergoing”

The war was putting a catastrophical strain on the country’s financial position.

WAR SAVINGS
A Successful Meeting

It is not always that a meeting passes from the academic into the practical, and the conveners and chairman of the meeting held at S. Giles’ Hall, London Street on Friday 3rd November are to be congratulated upon having achieved this.

The Vicar the Rev, F.J.C. Gillmor. M.A. , introduced the speaker, Mr. A.T. Tudor, by confessing that he himself was anxious to become a member, and see an association formed, as the necessity for such Associations everywhere was apparent.

Mr. Tudor, representing the local committee, of which the mayor is chairman, briefly outlined the objects of the National Committee, which he stated was formed as an outcome of recommendations made in the report of the committee on War Loans for the small investor dated January last, its objectives being:

1. To stimulate the sentiment and urge the need for economy.
2. To promote the formation of War Savings Associations.
3. To secure for the nation, through these associations, a certain amount of the money required for the prosecution of the War.
The year’s estimated national expenditure up to the 31st March next is 1825 millions, that is 5 millions a day, and as the pre-War amount was roughly only 200 million [per year], it was clear that unless everyone in every sphere lent a hand to help produce the remaining 1,600 millions the treasury was faced with unnecessary anxieties.

Mr. Tudor confessed that he objected to the “don’t” leaflets of the national committee and urged that English people should be left to arrange their own economy’s [sic], beginning when health and efficiency were secured. It was clear however that the possibilities of small savings were immense, as evinced by the 10 million raised by these associations, during the month of August, and locally also some 30 associations were already harmoniously working.

Apart from the attractiveness of the investment, which was an easy first in the history of any country anywhere at any time, there was the knowledge that one was lessening the incredible sufferings and hardships our soldiers and sailors were hourly undergoing for us all. This in itself should bring everyone in.

The fleet was mobilised the army was mobilised, and now it remained for the money to be mobilised.

The central committee were anxious to get in touch with everyone willing to help encourage and promote War Savings Associations, for their autumn campaign included activities from which it was hoped that every school, firm, factory and religious body be gathered in.
Mr Tudor instanced the valuable work done in certain departments of the Great Western Railway Company’s Works.

The meeting was unanimous in passing the following resolution, and the following were nominated and accepted office in the Association:

Chairman: Rev O.F. Spearing, M.A.
Secretary : Mr. Rowe.
Treasurer: Mr. A.T. Higgs.
With a most useful committee.

Resolved: That this meeting of S. Giles’ parishioners ; appreciating “that the obligation to provide in one way or another all that is necessary for the purposes of the war is a command to all citizens,” welcomes this opportunity for the forming an association forthwith;to be called the “S. Giles Parish War Savings association.”

It was hoped to obtain permission of the Governors of Reading Savings Bank for members to pay in there, and some 20 members promptly paid their initial subscriptions there and then.

In case this should meet the eye of anyone wishing to join who was not present at the meeting, the Hon. Secretary, Mr Rowe, will welcome the opportunity of sending them a card.


Reading St Giles parish magazine, December 1916 (D/P96/28A/33)

A cheery letter from hospital

The vicar of Reading St Giles reported on parishioners serving in the armed forces – plus the death of his predecessor’s son.

Notes from the Vicar

Intercessions list:

E.W. Wheeler, R.F.C.; G.J. Coggs, 3/7, Worcester Regt.; A.Coggs, 14th Batt. Worcester Pioneers; William E. Haynes, R.E.; Harold Merrick, 1st Garrison Batt. Worcester Regt.; William George Rowe, R.E. Eldridge, R. Berkshire Regt.(attached D.C.L.I.); Frederick Harry Goddard, Queens Own Dorset Yeomanry; Norman A. Norris, London Rifle Brigade.

To the list of the departed: Steward B. Nelson Bolton (H.M.S. Indefatigable); Capt. Aubrey N. Carew Hunt (Oxford and Bucks Lt. Infantry) Lieut. Henry Laing (R.N.); J.W. Beechey (H.M.S. Hampshire); A. North (London Rifle Brigade).

To the list of the wounded: Leonard Smith (Canadian Contingent).

As a parish and a congregation we offer our sincere sympathy to our late Vicar and his family in the death of his son killed at the front. I know how very much we have remembered them all in our prayers. We also extend our sympathy to the Rev. H.E. and Mrs Lury on the death of their daughter.

I have also had a cheery letter from Sergt.-Major A.F. Manning who is in Hospital in Leicester and is progressing favourably.


Reading St Giles parish magazine, July 1916 (D/P191/28A/24)