These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War

A final list of the Wargrave men who served in the war. NB: where this symbol † appears in the list, an entry for this soldier exists in the corresponding supplement to follow.

ROLL OF HONOUR.

These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War.

Additions and Corrections for this Roll should be sent to the Vicar as soon as possible.

Adby, L.
Adby, C.
Adby, W.
Adby, O.
Alderton, F. J.
Allen, C. W.
Allum, H.
Amos, G.
Andrew, H.
Arnold, A. E.
Arnold, W.
Attlesey, H. F.
(more…)

Advertisements

A willing sacrifice in this terrible war

A newlywed soldier from Reading was killed.

CONDOLENCES

We deeply regret to have to record the death of Private Ernest F. Nott, son of our esteemed friends Mr and Mrs Nott of Southampton Street. Private Nott of the 11th Border Regiment was attached to the 32nd Battalion MGC. On Easter Monday, a hostile shell penetrated his gun position and killed him instantly, somewhere near Bellacourt.

Like many more in this terrible war, Private Nott has laid down his life a willing sacrifice for his country and his loved ones. His death is all the more sad in view of the fact that no later than January 10th of this year he was married at Broad St to Miss Bertha Rixon. We deeply deplore his loss, and we tender our deepest sympathy to his young widow and his parents in their sore bereavement.

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, May 1918 (D/N11/12/1/14)

“If a sufficient number could spare one vegetable a week instead of one or two giving a large quantity the result would be very satisfactory”

A soldier stationed in Italy wanted to play football with his friends.

Crazies Hill Notes

Contributions of Vegetables for Wargrave Hospital will be gladly received on the Tuesday, during the Working Party. One vegetable will be very acceptable. If a sufficient number could spare one vegetable a week instead of one or two giving a large quantity the result would be very satisfactory.

Hare Hatch Notes

A Letter has been received from Sergt. W. Rixon, who is stationed in Italy, asking for a football. We are sure that the kindness of those friends who contributed to this need, will be greatly valued by him.

Wargrave parish magazine, February 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

A large number of people seem hardly to notice that there is a war at all

The vicar of Earley issued a reproach to those at home not supporting the war but behaving with only their own interest at heart.

The Vicar’s Letter

My dear friends

Winter is fast coming upon us and during the cold and wet days and nights our thoughts naturally go forth to our men fighting for us at the front; and when we think of them and all they have to endure, how can we grumble, as many are grumbling, at the increasing difficulty of obtaining many of the necessaries of life, and how can we be self-indulgent and wasteful, as so many are, in spite of all appeals for economy.

A large number of people seem hardly to notice that there is a war at all; we have hardly yet felt its real pinch, and if all will but share alike, there is no need why we should feel it to a greater extent than we do at present. We are not speaking of Reading or any part of it, for we believe that Reading as a whole has set a very good example, but there are always some people who think only of themselves, and the appeals from the authorities show that the need for self-denial is very great.

We heartily congratulate Mr Sarjeant, our people’s churchwarden, on being elected for a second time to fill the office of Mayor of the borough; he has carried out his arduous duties to the satisfaction of all, and Mrs Sarjeant has ably helped him as Mayoress: may it fall to her lot this coming year to preside at our town’s celebration of peace….

Your friend and vicar
W W Fowler

THE BISHOP’S MESSAGE

The following extracts are from the Bishop’s message in the November Diocesan Magazine:

your prayers are asked
For the Irish Convention and the maintenance throughout our own country of the spirit of unity.
For the upholding of the courage and determination of the Allies.
For those suffering from raids…

C. OXON.

LIST OF MEN SERVING IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES

The following additional names have been added to our prayer list:

Frank Hamblin, Frederick Argent, John Bolton, Frederick Winkworth, Albert Neill, George Bolton, Reginald Taylor, Herbert Guy, Albert May, William Allen.

In addition to those already mentioned we especially commend to your prayers:

SICK OR WOUNDED – George Cane, John Rosser, Harold Jones, Harry Rixon, Victor Gaines.

MISSING – Norman Black.

KILLED – Leonard Dann, Allan Smit, Frederick Nunn.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, November 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

Absolute disregard of danger

The village of Hare Hatch was proud of one of its sons, who had been given a medal following a brave stand under fire which sounds like something out of a Hollywood movie.

Hare Hatch Notes

We heartily congratulate our young friend Walter Rixon, Kiln Green, who has won the Military Medal, although but a lad when he enlisted soon after the war broke out, nothing could keep him back, he was attached to the 1/4 Royal Berkshire Regiment. The report of his bravery is as follows:-

“He showed absolute disregard of danger, he stood right on top of the trench in full view of all kinds of fire, and at a time when the Germans were shelling pretty heavily and were also busily engaged in sniping. There he stood – firing rifle grenades, and it was through him we were able to clear a party of Germans who were holding us up on the left. There were at least ten of them and by dropping a rifle grenade in the centre of the party he ousted them.”

Since this report we are pleased to hear that he has been promoted to Sergeant, “Bravo, Walter”. We all wish him a safe return home.

Wargrave parish magazine, December 1916 (D/P145/28A/31)

We do not forget

The Bishop congratulated the Revd T Guy Rogers, the Reading vicar turned army chaplain, on being awarded a medal for bravery.

THE BISHOP’S MESSAGE

The following extracts are from the Bishop’s message in the November Diocesan Magazine:

Your prayers are asked especially
For the good hand of God upon us in the war.
For our allies and especially for Roumania [sic].
For the National Mission…

Your thanksgivings are asked…
For the liberation of the Missionaries in German East Africa.

THE DIFFICULTY ABOUT EVENING SERVICES

I most heartily trust that neither in town parishes nor in country parishes will the evening service on Sundays be abandoned without a very strong effort to carry it on under conditions of lighting which the police can sanction…

THE DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE FOR PURPOSES OF BANNS

I wish to call attention again to the ruling under which I act, given by my Chancellor… to the effect that a person’s normal home where he or she is known may be reckoned as place of residence, though the person in question is at the moment absent whether on military service or for some other purpose.

We are all delighted to know that Mr Guy Rogers has been given the Military Cross. We do not forget him.

COMFORTS FOR THE TROOPS

I have received a letter from the Director General of Voluntary Organisations expressing great anxiety as to the sufficient supply of comforts for the troops, such as mittens, mufflers, helmets and socks, especially the three first. I am asked to ‘secure the co-operation of the clergy’ in my dioceses to make the anxiety known. The following are depots of the V.O.A. in this diocese…

Berkshire: W. C. Blandy, esq, 1 Friar Street, Reading…
Reading: D. Haslam, jun., esq, 16 Duke Street, Reading…

C. OXON

LIST OF MEN SERVING IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES

The following additional names have been added to our prayer list:

William Monger, George Slaughter, William Hewett, Harold Hales, Cecil Hales, William Brown, Albert Bishop, George O’Dell, Frederick Eady, Herbert Ballard, Alfred Clibbon, George Breakspear, Albert Gray, Harry Rixon, Walter Rosser, Rupert Wigmore, William Butler, Walter Drown, Percy Prater.

In addition to those already mentioned we especially commend the following to your prayers:

Killed: Percy Wyer, Walter May, Ernest Bishop.
Sick: Edward Iles, Charles Webb, William Wright.
Wounded: William Holmes, Frank, Fowler, Harry Merry, Arthur Morrice, Leonard Strong.
Wounded and Missing: Frank Snellgrove.
Missing: Edward Taylor.

CONCERT IN ST PETER’S HALL

On Wednesday, November 29th, there will be a concert in St Peter’s Hall to help provide funds for giving a Christmas Dinner and Entertainment to a party of Wounded Soldiers. Mr E. Love and party are working up an excellent programme, and we hope our readers will help to make the concert a great success by supporting it as much as they can.

Earley parish magazine, November 1916 (D/P191/28A/23/11)

Pray for the good hand of God upon us in the war

More Earley men had joined up, while churchgoers across the county were urged to pray for army chaplains.

THE BISHOP’S MESSAGE
The following extracts are from the Bishop’s message in the October Diocesan magazine:
Your prayers are specially asked

For the National Mission….
For the good hand of God upon us in the war.
For the chaplains to the forces, especially those from this diocese.
For the wounded in hospital, especially those in this diocese, and those who minister to them…
For the supply of candidates for Holy orders, especially from among those now serving as soldiers.

LIST OF MEN SERVING IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES

The following additional names have been added to our prayer list:

William Waite, William Wright, Harry Cartwright, James Maxwell, Edwin Jerome, Harold White, Lionel Dunlop, Brian Dunlop, William Illsley, Albert Flower, Tom Brooks, Harry Shepherd, Albert Andrews, Robert Lewis, Harry Longshaw, Horace Gilbert, George Stacey, Maurice Love.

In addition to those already mentioned we especially commend the following to your prayers:

Killed: Alfred Bolton, Percy Howlett, Ralph Hayes Sadler.
Died: Harry Stevens.
Wounded: Jack Howlett, Percy Hamilton, George Bungay, Sidney Saunders, Leonard Rixon, Frank Jones.
Sick: William Fisher, Sidney Farmer.

Earley parish magazine, October 1916 (D/P191/28A/31/10)

Experiencing the true horrors of war

Winkfield men were facing the horrors of war as the Battle of the Somme raged on.

PARISH NOTES

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.

Lieut. R. Hayes-Sadler having recovered from his wound has now returned to the Front. Pte. Walter Reed and Pte. Fred Thurmer have also just left for France. We trust that they and all our men who are now experiencing the true horrors of war will have the support of our very earnest prayers at this critical time.

Six of our men were wounded in the recent big advance in France.
2nd Lieut. George Ferard had a very narrow escape from death, he was hit in three places, the result of a shell bursting at his feet, killing several of his men and blowing him away five yards. He has made a wonderfully quick recovery and were rejoiced to see him in Church on July 16th, but of course it must be some time before he is fully recovered.

Pte. James Winnen was wounded in two places, but is now doing well in hospital in England. In a letter to the Vicar he writes:

“The wounds in my leg have healed up again, but when it was put under X rays it was discovered that there was a piece of shrapnel in the centre of the bone, which is impossible to get out. My arm is getting well, in fact the doctor said he had never see a wound heel up so soon considering it was a shrapnel wound. I think I was very lucky to escape with such slight wounds. I shall most certainly come and see you when I get home. I know it will interest you to hear about my experiences in the German lines [he received first aid from a German doctor] I can’t quite realize yet that I am in England, in fact, I still fancy I can hear the guns roaring.”

Pte. Reginald Knight was also wounded in two places, but is recovering rapidly in hospital and is already up and about the wards.

Lance-Corporal Harry Rixon has been wounded for the second time during this war and so has earned two of the new gold stripes. He and his brother, Sergt. William Rixon, we are glad to hear, are going on well.

Pte. Edward Holloway has been wounded slightly and is doing well at a base hospital in France.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, August 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/8)

Helping to look after our splendid troops

The Boys of St Peter’s, Earley, normally borrowed camping equipment from the army. It was of course all in use during the war.

CHURCH LADS’ BRIGADE AND SCOUTS

We are hoping to have a three days’ camp at Newbury from August 5th to 8th. We shall be obliged to sleep in schoolrooms, &c, as tents are not allowed, and we shall have to take our own blankets, &c, as it is quite impossible to get any from the military stores.

ST PETER’S HALL

The Hon, Treasurer appeals for help as the funds are now practically exhausted, and opportunities for assisting these are, in the difficult times we are passing through, few and far between. In normal times various entertainments and other schemes were carried through successfully by the Committee to augment the receipts, but other interests have crowded these out, and yet the Hall must be kept going.

We most earnestly appeal to our readers to help the funds of the above Hall. The Hall has been invaluable during the war, for, in addition to all the ordinary work carried on in it, we have used it constantly for entertainments for the M.T.A.S.C. and the wounded soldiers, so that those who subscribe to the Hall will have the satisfaction of knowing that they are also helping to look after our splendid troops.

LIST OF MEN SERVING IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES

The following additional names have been added to our prayer list:
William Ellis, Thomas Neilan, George Barnes, Frank Williams, Richard Smith, Archie Morris, Alfred Levens, Henry King, William Cook, Reginald Wyer, Leonard Rixon.

In addition to those already mentioned we especially commend the following to your prayers:

Sick: Jack Parker.
Wounded and Missing: Bernard Tait.
Wounded: John Rosser, Joseph Powell, Charles Barton, Charles Bolton.
Killed in Action: Allan Brown, Dick May, Hereward Sadler.

Earley parish magazine, August 1916 (D/P191/28A/31/8)

‘Skilful treatment has removed the danger’ of a soldier losing an arm

Men from Winkfield continued to join up.

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.

We have now to add to our list the following who have joined His Majesty’s Forces during last month-

Pte. Frank Brant, Royal Berks Regiment.
Pte. Sydney Ottaway, Royal Berks Regiment.
Pte. Victor Reed, Royal Berks Yeomanry.
Pte. Frank Rixon, Royal Berks Yeomanry.
Pte. Alfred Thurmer, Royal Berks Regiment.

2nd Lieut. George Ferard, King’s Royal Rifles and Pte. Jack Dean, Coldstream Guards, have just gone to the Front, and will, we trust, have a place in all our prayers.

Lieut. Cecil Ferard, R.F.A., was recently reported as wounded at Salonika, and for a time his relatives had much anxiety since no details could be obtained; and so we are glad to hear now that the wound was slight and he has now recovered.

We are also very glad to be able to report that Sergeant James Thurmer is progressing very well. At one time it was feared that he would lose his right arm, but skilful treatment has removed this danger, and he is now well on the way to convalescence.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, June 1916 (D/P151/28A/6)

A good report

Wargrave parishioners donated a flag for the church, while some soldiers came home on leave.

Gifts to the Church

Two Flags have been presented to the Church by the kindness of an anonymous donor: The Union Jack for all National Festivities, and St. George’s Cross for Church Festivals… We record these presents with our most grateful thanks.

The Pigott School Penny Bank – 1915

DR £ s. d.

To Balance from 1914 12 7 8
Deposits 1915 91 3 5
Bonus from Parochial Funds 1 1 10

Total £104 12 11

CR £ s. d.

By Amount paid into P.O.S.B. 14 2 0
Amount withdrawn 73 4 1
Balance in hand 17 6 10

Total £104 12 11

Number of Depositors – 80
H. Coleby, Treasurer

Notwithstanding 1915 being a year of War, the School’s Penny Bank flourished. The amounts paid into the P.O.S.B. were not so large as in former years, but the amount withdrawn was greatly in advance of that of 1914. More than one parent has expressed gratification at having a nice little sum to fall back upon when it was urgently needed.

Hare Hatch Notes

We were pleased to welcome home on leave from the front the following Walter Rixon, Orlando Hussey, Gladstone Sharp, William Arnold; each of them was able to give a good report.

Wargrave parish magazine, February 1916 (D/P145/28A/31)

There are now very few indeed of military age who have not offered their services

Many men in Winkfield had responded to the renewed call for volunteers. Sir Thomas Berney (1893-1975), who actually lived in Norfolk, had been educated in Berkshire, at Wellington College.

PARISH NOTES

Lieut. Sir Thomas Berney has left England for the East. We trust that he, together with the now large number of our men at the front, will be remembered in our daily prayers.

Cecil Hayes-Sadler has received a well earned commission after 15 months good service as a despatch rider at the front. He obtained a few days leave home, but has now returned again to duty.

Lord Derby’s campaign for fresh recruits has met with a good response in our parish, and we believe there are now very few indeed of military age who have not offered their services. Some have been refused on medical grounds and some are waiting to be called up when their turn comes, but the following have been accepted for immediate service and have joined their regiments:-

Joseph Church, Royal Field Artillery
Daniel Taylor, Royal Garrison Artillery
Sydney Thurmer, Royal Garrison Artillery
Fred Thurmer, Royal Berks Regiment
Henry Oatway, Royal Engineers
Earnest Woodage, King’s Royal Rifles.

Privates Walter Woodage, Henry Rixon and Wallace Nickless have been wounded, but we are glad to be able to report that they are all doing well, and making a good recovery.

Lance-Corporal Charles Reed has been slightly wounded and is now home for a short rest and change.

We congratulate Lance-Corporal R. Nickless on attaining the rank of full Corporal, and Private Wallace Nickless on his promotion to Lance-Corporal.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, December 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/12)

All trying to “do our bit” to help our King and Country in one way or another

Spurred on by the loss of local men, women in Bracknell and district were working hard making medical supplies and warm clothing for the troops and Navy.

THE WAR

We have, we are grieved to say, two more names to add to the Roll of Honour of this Parish.

Percy Treble of the Royal Berks Regt. has been killed in the fighting in France and Harry Rixon of the Canadian Contingent succumbed to wounds received from bombs dropped by a Zeppelin in the last great raid. The families of both these young men are well known in Bracknell, and great sympathy is felt for them in their sorrow.

* * *

THE WAR WORK DEPOT.

The work at the Depot proceeds very satisfactorily and since it was opened on July 28th, many sandbags have been sent to Miss Tyler’s office in Highgate for distribution to the Front. The Needlework department has sent 19 flannel shirts, 10 cotton ditto, 41 pyjama suits, 22 bed jackets to the Central Depot, St. Marylebone, and to the mine sweepers 23 flannel shirts. The Surgical Dressing Department has made and handed over to the same Central Depot of which Miss Ethel McCaul is the organiser, 13 leg rests, 55 splints, 15 hip, 30 T., 20 stump and 80 abdominal bandages, 468 Turkey towelling, 408 gauze and 620 puff (gauze and wool) swabs, 20 caps for head wound dressings, 54 jug and basin covers. The Knitting department too has been doing good work and several dozen pairs of socks, sea boot stockings, steering gloves, mittens and cuffs have been made, also scarves and helmets, for the men of the mine sweeping fleet, patrol boats and trawlers.

The number of workers attending the depot continues to be satisfactory, though there is still room for more, who would be welcome. The average attendance is about 100 each day. The hours the rooms are now open are from 9.45 to 4.45 on Wednesdays and Fridays, the failing daylight making it expedient to close earlier. Tea is served at 4.15 at a charge of 2d. per head; the money thus taken goes towards the running expenses of cleaning and firing. For the convenience of those workers wishing to bring their lunch, arrangements are made for them to eat it in comfort, and upon notice being given to the Secretary on their arrival, tea can be made, or soup, milk or other hot drinks warmed for them.

Warfield Parish has its subsidiary working party and is making hospital clothing, housewives, and sandbags, and sending in through this depot, providing their own material but using the patterns supplied by Bracknell. Chavey Down is doing the same and has sent in a capital consignment of pyjama suits and helpless-case night shirts to the needlework department. Thus are we all trying to “do our bit” to help our King and Country in one way or another.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/11)

Why should the young do all the fighting and the dying and offer the great sacrifice by themselves?

The people of Winkfield were urged to support the young men who were heading to the Front.

VICAR’S LETTER

MY DEAR FRIENDS,

When you receive this Magazine we shall be nearing the completion of a year of War, and this fact cannot fail to solemnize in our minds and make us seriously consider whether we are one and all doing our duty in this supreme crisis of our Nation’s history.

The call to service and sacrifice has been answered by numbers of our young men – a list of whom is printed in this month’s Magazine – but have we who are unable to offer ourselves for active service contributed all we can and ought to the common cause? As the Bishop of London says, why should the young do all the fighting and the dying and offer the great sacrifice by themselves? The sacrifice that is for all should be offered by all, and all are bound to make the resolution “I will pray, I will repent, I will serve, I will save.”

And yet we must sorrowfully confess that the army of intercessors to offer prayer as sacrificial as the self-oblation of the millions of men who have offered themselves for war, has not been forthcoming; unlike France or Russia, out Churches have not been filled with men and women to pray for the men whose peril and blood is their shield, and I must confess to much heart sickness and disappointment that even our intercessory services in the second Sunday evenings and the last Sunday mornings in the month have not been better attended.

What is the explanation? It cannot be that we are indifferent to our country’s need or without love to our brothers at the Front; nor is it that England does not believe in God; there is enough love of our country and enough belief in God to crowd our Churches with earnest suppliants. What then is lacking? Is it not the belief in prayer and especially the belief in united supplication in God’s house? Is not the lack of this the reason why the men and women who ought to be in the praying line have not proved so steadfast as the men in the fighting line, who so greatly need our prayers, and surely have a right to expect them.

I sincerely hope therefore that large numbers will make a real and special effort to attend the special Intercession Services on Wednesday, August 4th and on Sunday, August 8th, of which notice is given in another column. The result of this war will depend very largely on the atmosphere of prayer which has been created, for prayer is the strongest force in the world, and as has been truly said, through prayer we bring our nation and our Allies into contact with Christ, and set the life of the whole Society as well as individuals in the stream of that purpose of redemptive love which can overrule even war for God.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,
H. M. MAYNARD.

PARISH NOTES

Lieut. Godfrey Loyd and Private Henry Hoptroff have just gone to the Front, and Privates Edwin Gray, Ernest Gray, Edward Holloway and Lance-Corporal Reginald Nickless are under orders to be in readiness to go immediately. We trust that they and their naturally anxious relatives will have a place in our prayers.

Much sympathy is felt for the family of Private John Williams (Royal Field Artillery) who died in hospital after a very long and distressing illness. He was buried with full military honours at Cosham Cemetery on July 1st, and special memorial prayers were said for him on Sunday, July 4th.

NOTICE

On Wednesday, 4th August, the anniversary of the declaration of war, a great service in St. Paul’s Cathedral has been arranged, when the King and all the leaders of the nation will attend to inaugurate the second year of the war be asking God’s help. In Winkfield Church, there will be Celebration of the Holy Communion at 8 a.m., and Litany and Intercession at 11 a.m. Also Evensong and Intercession at S. Mary the Less at 7.30 p.m.

On Sunday, August 8th, both morning and evening, there will be special services with Intercessions and Thanksgivings for the way in which the country has been preserved from many dangers.

The following is list of Winkfield men serving in His Majesty’s Forces at Home and Abroad.
(more…)

Make the Wargrave Roll of Honour perfect

Many parishes regularly published a Roll of Honour of those serving. One of these was Wargrave, and July saw the publication of Part 2 of their list:

The Roll of Honour for The Parish of Wargrave

Luker, Ernest, VIII Hussars
F Mance, Robert. Army Services Corps.
F Milford, John. R.F.A.
F Morse, George. Royal Berks Regt.
F Nicholl, Charles. Major. Oxfordshire Hussars.
Nicholl, Kenneth. Capt. Welsh Fusiliers
F Nicholls, Albert. Royal Berks Regt
Noble, Eric Heatley. 2nd Lieut. Grenadier Guards
Noble, Norris Heatley. 2nd Lieut. Kings Royal Rifles
F Ogbourne, Harry. 1st Life Guards.
F Over, Reginald. Lce-Corp. Ox and Bucks Light Infy
Parritt, William John. Lce-Corp R.E.
Paget, Colin. Wiltshire Territorials
F Perry, George Edwin. Scotch Greys
Piggott, George. Ox and Bucks Light Infy
Pithers, James. VIII Royal Berks Regt
Plested, Herbert. Royal Berks Regt
Plested, Albert. Royal Berks Regt
Plowman, Thomas Austen. Berks Yeomanry
Porter, Albert E. Army Service Corps
F Pugh, Ernest. Royal Berks Regt
Rhodes, John Edward. Lt-Col. Princess Beatrice’s Isle of Wight Rifles
Rhodes, Wilfred. Major. Provost Marshal on Staff
F Rhodes, Victor. Capt. Late Sherwood Foresters
Remnant, John. Lieut. Royal Berks Regt
Rayner, John. 2nd Lieut. Royal Berks Regt
Reid, George William. Royal Berks Regt
Richardson, Fred. Berks Yeomanry
Rideout, Henry Randall. Expeditionary Force’s Canteen
Rixon, Charles. Royal Berks Regt
F Rixon, Walter. Royal Berks Regt
Rufey, William. Royal Berks Regt
F Shepherd, Henry. Capt. IX C of London Regt
F Schuster, Leonard Francis. Lieut. 3rd County of London Yeomanry
Sinclair, Gerald John. 2nd Lieut. Black Watch
Sanson, Gordon Ralph. Hon. Artillery Co.
F Sharp, Ernest Gladstine. VIII Dragoon Guards
Sharp, Samuel. Lee-Corp. Welsh Fusiliers
F Sharp, William. Army Service Corps
Shaw, George. Royal Berks Regt
F Shersby, Edward. Ox and Bucks Light Infy
Sherwood, Fred. Royal Berks Regt
Silver, Frank. Army Services Corps
Silver, Harry. R.F.A.
F Silvey, Stephen. R.A.M.C.
Slatter, T. Ox and Bucks Light Infy
Slattery, Udolph Wolfe. 2nd Lieut. IX West Kent Regt
Smith, George Frederick. Veterinary Corps
Stanbridge, Albert. Irish Fusiliers
F Stone, Samuel Philip. Ox and Bucks Light Infy
F Swanborough, Alfred. Army Services Corps
F Symons-Jeune, Bertram. Lieut. Army Service Corps
Talbot, Arthur. Corpl. IInd Royal Berks Regt
F Talbot, Anthony George. XCIIth Lancers
F Talbot, Albert. Army Services Corps
Tigwell, Monty. Royal Berks Regt
F Watson, Burton. Major. 107th Pioneers, Indian Army
F Watson, Cyril. Captain. Middlesex Husaars
Walsh, Gordon Herbert. Lieut. Royal Sussex Regt
Wakefield, Caleb. Ox and Bucks Light Infy
Wakefield, Cecil. Royal Berks Regt
F Warby, Albert H. XIIth Lancers
F Webb, George. Rifle Brigade
Weller, David. R.F.A.
Woodruff, Charles Herbert. Xth Regt Cavelry

Warren Row In the Parish of Knowl Hill

(more…)