Merry as a marriage bell – despite the unbidden guest

Church choirs typically had an annual jolly day out. The choir at Broad Street Church in Reading invited along a group of wounded soldiers in 1918.

July

RIVER TRIP

Arrangements are being made by the Church Choir for a river trip in the afternoon of Saturday, July 20th, when they hope to entertain a party of wounded soldiers. Goring and Hartslock Woods will most likely be the places visited. In addition to the members of the choir and their wounded friends, there will be accommodation for about thirty visitors. Full details have not yet been arranged, but particulars may be obtained from members of the choir after July 1st. It is very desirable, however, that early application should be made for tickets by those who wish to join the party.

August

CHOIR TRIP

On Saturday, July 20th, the annual choir trip took place, the destination this time being Goring and Hartlock Woods. A party of twenty-five wounded soldiers from the military hospitals had been invited as guests of the choir, so there was accommodation for only about forty other friends.

In the forenoon the weather outlook seemed very uncertain, but as 1.30 pm drew near it assumed a more promising aspect. Immediately after the arrival of “the men in blue” the steam-launch “River Queen” was started, and the party of 105 proceeded upstream at a steady pace. The choir discoursed sweet music as we journeyed and “all went merry as a marriage bell”.

We reached Goring without mishap at 4.15 pm, and there we disembarked for about twenty-five minutes, to permit of a hasty look round. Setting off on the return journey at 4.45 pm, we reached Hartslock Woods at 5 o’clock, and took a short walk whilst arrangements were being made for tea.

At 5.15 we sat down to do full justice to the good things provided. The sun was now shining with unwonted brilliance, and was even considered by some to be too powerful. After tea, Mr F. W. Harvey read a letter from the Rev. W. Morton Rawlinson (who unfortunately, through indisposition, was unable to join the party) and in an appropriate speech gave welcome to our guests. To this welcome, the officer who accompanied the wounded soldiers fittingly replied, and expressed the gratitude of those for whom he spoke.

The company now dispersed in various directions. Some rambled along the banks of the river; others explored the beautiful woods; and still others climbed the high hill from which an uninterrupted view could be gained of “Father Thames”, stretching away into the distance on either side.

As our soldier friends had been granted an extension of time it was not proposed to start for home until 8.15. but unhappily the fickle sun, which had promised so well at tea-time, was hidden from view by a heavy thunder-cloud, which speedily began to give us a taste of its contents. Everyone made for the boat, and at 7.30, as there seemed to be no prospect of a change in the weather, it was decided to return.

The rain continued most of the way home, but the choir again delighted us with various musical selections, and made it impossible for us to feel depressed or even dull. Their efforts to beguile the time, from Tilehurst onwards, were supplemented by those of three youngsters on the lookout for stray pence, who, on the river bank, kept pace with the boat and provided a varied exhibition.

Altogether, although the rain was an unbidden guest, the trip was most thoroughly enjoyed, and great praise is due to the choir for the entertainment given to their wounded guests and to the whole party. We should like to thank Mr Harvey, too, and the members of the Choir Committee, for the excellent arrangements made for the comfort of all.

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, July and August 1918 (D/N11/12/1/14)

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Great reduction in coal ration

Sir Henry Rawlinson (1864-1925) was to be held responsible after the war for some of the tactical decisions which had led to appalling losses at the Battle of the Somme. During the war, however, his star was still bright.

3 April 1918

H to Coal Ration Committee. Great reduction!

Germans not yet begun further big attack. General Gough was sent back. Sir H Rawlinson takes his place.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/8)

“A Pacifist peace means Armageddon for our children”

Cambridge don John Maxwell Image struggled with the newly implemented food rationing. John Rawlinson, an Old Etoniam and alumnus of Image’s college, Trinity, was MP for Cambridge University (a constituency specifically to represent graduates across the country). A former international footballer, he was patriotically dieting.

29 Barton Road
25 March ‘18

This morning have arrived our Food Tickets. Oh, I gape! Florence professes to understand them. All I can utter is ‘Pests’. Cnspuez Rhondda!

Yesterday, in the Bowling Green, we met Rawlinson, MP, who vowed that he had for weeks been existing on a hebdomadal 1/3 of meat (so at least, he seems to say), and that he found the Fellows far too fat and well liking to have been loyal.

A Pacifist peace means Armageddon for our children. Who in honesty denies that?

Veni sancta Columbia.

And you prefer Margarine to Butter? I haven’t yet, to my knowledge, tried it. Devonshire Butter I count the noblest relish on earth. We can’t get Cheese, off which I regularly used to lunch.


Ever yours
Bild

Letter from John Maxwell Image, Cambridge don, to W F Smith (D/EX801/2)

The meaning of Christmas: ‘You won’t be afraid when your time comes to “go over the top”’

Members of Broad Street Church sent gifts to their friends at the front – and the minister had some special words of comfort for them this Christmas.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS

It has been decided to send once more a Christmas Greeting to men of the church and Brotherhood who are serving with HM Forces. Each man is to receive a small parcel as in previous years. As there are 150 men to be provided for this will involve considerable expense. Our friends are therefore asked for their generous help. The best way in which this could be given would be by gifts of money. But for those who prefer to contribute goods it is acceptable, viz: Woollen comforts, soap, candles, condensed milk, tobacco and cigarettes, towels, handkerchiefs, sweets in tins, sardines, note paper and envelopes. Mr C Dalgleish, Hollybush, Grosvenor Road, Caversham, has kindly consented to rceive gifts of money. Goods will be gratefully received by either Mrs Rawlinson, 50 Western Elms Avenue, or Mr W A Woolley, 85 Oxford Road.

THE MESSAGE OF CHRISTMAS TO OUR MEN AWAY

What has Christmas to do this year with you, or indeed with any of us? At first sight, little enough; but looking deeper, everything.
God did not create a humanity that was bound to go wrong, and then leave it. He is not “an absentee God, sitting idle, at the outside of His universe, and seeing it go.” There was only one way to fight the evil, and God – all Righteousness and all Love – took that. “O generous love! that he who smote in man for man the foe…” The Divine Personality was born a little child over nineteen hundred years ago. That was Christmas.

He began by obeying orders, doing irksome things that seemed unmeaning and useless, but doing them as long as they had to be done. Then he lived in self-sacrifice, giving Himself for others utterly. He was friend and healer and helper wherever there was need. He fought evil with good, and hate with love. He stood for right and justice against odds. So far as you follow Him, and do these things, that is Christmas for you.

The meaning of Christmas persists. Christ is alive and working now, more nearly present than He could be then, and what He was on earth he is still.
….
He is still the friend and helper, with you in all loneliness and need and temptation. It keeps you straight, often to remember the eyes waiting at home, expecting that yours will be able to smile squarely into them when you come back. You can’t go wrong when you remember His eyes expecting as much, but with the power, too, to quell any demon that attacks you. You have not to fight your battles alone. He is no myth. Reach out to Him in your extremity, and see whether He fails you. “I will not leave you comfortless: I will come to you.”

You won’t be afraid to leave your home people in His care, knowing that He cares for them as much as you do – as they have the harder task of leaving you. Every Sunday, and how many times between, they and we think of you, and pray for His care of you – in the trenches, or in the air, or in the sea; in hospitals or in camps; in far lands or in the home country; in drudgery or in danger.

You won’t be afraid when your time comes to “go over the top” (at the end of a long life, as we trust), seeing that the Friend with whpm you have lived and who you have trusted so long, is waiting out there for you, in that life which He left to come to your help.
All this is what Christmas means for you.

In connection with the Church, Christmas parcels are being sent to our Brothers in the Forces as before, and a “collection in kind” will have been taken by the time these notes are in print, and another in money will be asked for on December 2nd.

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, December 1917 (D/N11/12/1/14)

Soldiers get very rough and ready, but are grateful to the churches for hospitality

One of the soldiers who had attended the social evenings run by Broad Street Church wrote to say how much he appreciated it. The “pioneers” in the British Army were engaged in construction and engineering, and also leading assaults on major fortifications.

APPRECIATION OF HOSPITALITY

The friends who are helping in connection with our work amongst the soldiers are constantly hearing expressions of appreciation and thanks. But the following letter is perhaps the best evidence of the feeling which has been called forth. It was sent to Mr Rawlinson by Corporal Hill of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, and it speaks for itself:

Litherland
Near Liverpool

November 20th, 1917

Dear Sir,

I am writing to thank you for all you did for me during my stay in Reading.

I was attached to the Pioneer School, and took advantage of your hospitality, and appreciate it very much; and I must say I appreciate it more now that I have left Reading. I was too “nervous” or I should have thanked you personally on behalf of the fellows of the School, for the good time you gave us. So please convey my gratitude to those who entertained us on Sunday evenings, and also yourself for allowing us there. I know soldiers get very rough and ready, but I have heard some of them speak in glowing terms of the efforts made by the Congregationalists all over the country to help cheer up all those who were away from home, and wanted somewhere where they could spend a quiet and contemplative evening.

I have a very good impression of Reading, and am looking forward to the time when I shall be able to visit it again.

I shall be very pleased to receive a letter from you.

Again thanking you for what you have done for me amomgst many.

Yours sincerely
A J Hill.

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, December 1917 (D/N11/12/1/14)

Food from Harvest “will be greatly appreciated by the wounded men in hospital”

Worshippers at Broad Street Church sent their Harvest Festival offerings to the Royal Berkshire Hospital for wounded soldiers.

HARVEST FESTIVAL

The Harvest Thanksgiving Services, held on Sunday, September 23rd, afforded joy and inspiration to all who were able to attend. The church was very prettily and effectively decorated for the occasion. A plentiful supply of fruit, vegetables, flowers, etc, had been provided…

On the following day the good things provided were conveyed by Mr Bunce to the Royal Berks Hospital, for the wounded soldiers who are there.

Mr Rawlinson [the minister] has since received the following letter from the secretary of that institution:

“Dear Sir

Many thanks for your letter, and for the eggs, fruit, vegetables, flowers, bread, etc, which arrived yesterday.

These will be greatly appreciated by the wounded men in hospital, and I should be grateful if you would accept for yourself, and kindly convey to all concerned, an expression of our warmest thanks for this generous present.

I am, dear Sir,
Yours faithfully

Herman Burney
Secretary”

BROTHERHOOD NOTES

The annual Harvest Festival in connection with the church was held on Sunday September 23rd, and as usual our brothers contributed very liberally with fruit and vegetables from their allotments.

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, October 1917 (D/N11/12/1/14)

Heroes in blue and grey and a rained-off garden party

Reading Congregational Church choir entertained wounded soldiers at a garden party in July 1917. They announced the occasion in the church magazine:

The Garden Party to wounded soldiers which the choir have arranged to give instead of their usual River Trip, will be held on Wednesday, July 4th. Mr and Mrs Tyrrell have very generously placed their beautiful garden at the disposal of the choir for this function, and to them our best thanks are due for their kindness. We earnestly hope that the day may be fine, and that the “party” may be a big success in every way.

But unfortunately, the weather turned out to be a disaster. The August issue of the magazine reported on the event’s success, regardless.

CHOIR HOSPITALITY

Wednesday, July 4th was a day that will long be remembered by many of us. It was the day that had been fixed by the choir for their “Khaki” Garden Party. In other words, it was the day upon which the choir, having foregone their usual river trip for the purpose, had decided to entertain wounded soldiers from the various “War Hospitals”, in the grounds of “Rosia”, Upper Redlands Road, which had so generously been placed at their disposal by Mr and Mrs Tyrrell.
Thus it had all been arranged. But alas for “the best laid plans of mice and men!” We had counted without the weather. When the day arrived it was very soon evident that the steady downpour of rain would upset all calculations, and that garden parties would be out of the question. It was terribly disappointing, but there was no help for it. And so our energetic choir master and Miss Green were early abroad, with a view to an in-door gathering at Broad Street. It was no easy task they had to perform, but it was successfully accomplished, and by the time the visitors arrived everything was in readiness for their reception.

Shortly before 2.30 p.m. the “heroes in blue and grey”, brought by trams specially chartered for the purpose, began to troop in, and in a short time the schoolroom was crowded. It was a thoroughly good-natured company, intent upon making the most of their opportunities; and no time was lost in setting to work. Games and competitions were immediately started, and proceeded merrily, in a cloud of smoke from the cigarettes kindly provided by Mr Tyrrell.

At 4.15 a halt was called whilst preparations were made for tea. There was an adjournment to the church, where, for half an hour, Miss Green, assisted by members of the choir, “discoursed sweet music”. On returning to the Schoolroom the guests were delighted to find that ample provision had been made for their refreshment, and they did full justice to the good things provided.

After tea there was an impromptu concert in which the honours were divided between hosts and guests, selections from “Tom Jones” and other items by the choir being interspersed with “contributions” by the men themselves. It was a thoroughly happy time, and 7 o’clock came all too quickly.

Shortly before the close of the proceedings Mr Rawlinson voiced the general regret that the weather had interfered with the arrangements originally made, but hoped the visitors had all enjoyed themselves; and Mr Harvey expressed the indebtedness of the choir to Mr and Mrs Tyrrell, Mr and Mrs Brain, and other friends for the help they had given with the undertaking. Rousing cheers were given for Mr Harvey, the choir, and all concerned, for the hospitality provided, and after partaking of light refreshments in the shape of fruit, mineral waters, etc, the visitors made their way to the trams that were waiting for them, thoroughly pleased with the good time they had enjoyed.

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, July and August 1917 (D/N11/12/1/14)

Bread and butter, yes! real butter at khaki socials

Reading Congregational Church reports on another winter’s worth of entertaining soldiers.

KHAKI SOCIALS

Now that the Khaki Socials have ended for the season, a short report may be of interest to those who read the magazine.

The winter season started on Sunday October 8th 1916, and continued every Sunday until May 6th 1917, a total (including Good Friday) of 32 Socials. At first they were not attended as well as could be expected, but after a while they became more widely known, and many nights the room has been quite crowded. The average attendance for the season was about sixty soldiers, besides others who came in as “friends”.

One of the chief features of the socials has been the refreshments, which were always appreciated by the Khaki boys, especially the thin pieces of bread and butter, yes! real butter.

The singing of the Fellowship Hymns was much enjoyed, special favourites being “All Hail the Power”, “Fight the Good Fight” and “Lead, kindly Light”, which were often selected by the men themselves, and couldn’t they sing, too!

The “tone” of the concerts was well maintained throughout the season, thanks to the various kind friends who have rendered help in this way.

The financial side of the Socials has been rather heavy, on account of the extra cost of foodstuffs. Consequently there is a deficit of several pounds.

The average cost per social was about 12/-, and it is estimated that nearly 2.000 Tommies attended and received refreshments during the season, so the committee cannot be accused of “over-feeding” at any rate.

There is now a splendid opportunity for two or three generous friends to send along their donations to wipe off the deficiency.

It would take too much space to say what I should like to say about all the friends who have helped so splendidly; but there are two or three who certainly should be mentioned. First is our Minister, Mr Rawlinson, who has presided on most nights, and has done more than anyone to cheer and brighten the meetings. It is not everyone who, after a strenuous day’s work, would undertake this extra work, but Mr Rawlinson has done it and done it cheerfully. Then Mr and Mrs J Ford and Mrs Witcombe, the “Food Controllers”, must be mentioned for their splendid services. Always behind the scenes, yet always on the spot and ready. They never once failed to supply even the “sugar”. Then our best thanks are due to one who, although not on the committee, has done good work as welcomer and door keeper. I refer to Mr J Owen. Some of the men got quite used to his welcome “how a-r-r-e you?”, especially the “Welsh Boys”.

What we should have done without Mrs Dracup and Miss Green in the musical department of the work, it is difficult to think. They have been a real help, and each deserves the silver medal for “services rendered”.

Besides those mentioned, the Khaki Socials Committee consisted of the following, all of whom have done their share of the work:
Mr Nott, Mrs Hendey, Mrs Woolley, Mr and Mrs Tibble, Mr A S Hampton and Mr Swallow, Mr Hendey as treasurer, and Mr W A Woolley as secretary.

The same committee has been re-elected to arrange Garden Parties, River Trips, etc, for the wounded soldiers during the summer months. Friends wishing to help in this good work should communicate with the secretary, who will be pleased to book up dates and make arrangements.

W A Woolley

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, June 1917 (D/N11/12/1/14)

Our first brother killed in this cruel war

The Broad Street Brotherhood, the men’s group at the big Congregational Church in central Reading (now Waterstone’s bookshop) was still sending its members off to the armed forces. They were sobered by their first death in action.

BROTHERHOOD NOTES

As we all know, our brother L Victor Smith left England some weeks ago to carry out duties in France. We miss him very much. He has done a tremendous amount of “spade work” in connection with our Society … the beautiful Rolls of Honour, which are hanging up in the vestibule, were amongst his latest pieces of work.

We have now got a very large number of our brothers either serving in France, or in the old country, and we are very glad and grateful to learn that the members of the church and Mrs Rawlinson are sending each of our brothers a parcel of good things at Christmas. In addition, we as a society are sending a cheery personal letter signed by our Presidents, so that our brothers will not be forgotten.

Our Mass Meeting and collection on behalf of the PSA fund for the relief of distress in Belgium, will be held in the early part of the New Year. Mr Rawlinson is arranging for one of the leading orators of the movement to address the meeting, and Mr Mann, secretary of the National Federation, will explain the objects of the fund.
Our choir has been through troubled waters. During the last few months they have had no less than three conductors, two leaving to join the army…

It is with deepest regret that we have to report the death of Brother V M May, of the 8th Royal Berks Regiment, who died in action last month. He is our first brother who has been killed in this cruel war.

ROLL OF HONOUR. POSTAL ADDRESSES.
The following names should be added to the church list given in the magazine last month:-
Cane, 2776 Pte, Norman, 1st Platoon A Co, 1/4th Royal Berks Regiment, BEF
Fletcher, Driver E A, Motor Transport Service, G and H Block, Grove Park, London
Jones, Off. Std. Wm Fletcher, No 12 Hut, East Camp, Royal Naval Barracks, Chatham

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine (D/N11/12/1/14)

A real sacrifice

Lady Mary Glyn wrote to her son Ralph with news of the service of various family friends and acquaintances.

Nov. 25, 1915
Overstone
Northampton
My darling Scraps

We had luncheon & tea with Mrs Guy & Mildred Stewart. Her husband is Staff Brigade Major with General Montgomery and she says they all adore Sir Henry Rawlinson, and all that was best in the Loos Battle was his work. And it was wonderful to hear all that Mrs Guy’s many sons are doing – all fighting, except Lasey who is in “Grandpapa’s Own”, the Inns of Court Battalion, and gets much chaffed.

Marmion was at the Suvla Bay landing & his Colonel Linton was killed just after the landing & when he had stood in water 6 hours, 4 ft 4 deep and more for the landing. Allan Guy has just gone as Private with Public Schools Battalion attached to Fusiliers, and the mother says that she thinks this means for him a real giving & sacrifice, for he has never been a soldier, & only schoolmastering. You will remember Mansel Bowly as Commander of the Fed. In Dardanelles.

I have no news to give you, for I have seen very few people lately, and the newspapers are not much good, for what is news today, is stale tomorrow in these days.

Own Mur
I am always thinking of you.

Letter from Lady Mary to Ralph Glyn (D/EGL/C2/2)

Keeping in touch with the young men who have joined up

Broad Street Church in Reading continued to support its young men who had joined up. The church magazine for April reports:

OUR SOLDIERS
Efforts have been made in various ways to keep in touch with the young men of Broad Street who have joined the colours. Many letters have been sent to them, and many received from them. More tangible expressions of interest and sympathy have also been forwarded in the shape of parcels. Mrs Rawlinson has taken responsibility for very much of this good work, and she wishes to convey her sincere thanks to all who have helped her with their gifts of all kinds. She wishes us further to say that she would be glad to receive contributions from any other friends who can give assistance. She would specially welcome gifts of socks, books and money.

Broad Street Congregational Church magazine, April 1915 (D/N11/12/1/14)

No one can realise what it is like out here

A Reading soldier wrote to the wife of his minister at home to tell her about the horrors of what he was experiencing. The letter was later published in the magazine of Broad Street Congregational Church.

1st Batt. Herts Regt
British Expeditionary Force
France
February 10th, 1915

Dear Mrs Rawlinson,

Just a few lines to say thank you for your kind words and …

We have had four days in the trenches. On Sunday morning last we had a very warm time. Shells were bursting all round us, but fortunately only two were killed and a few injured. I thought of all the people at home going to Church and Chapel and having ever such a quiet time, whilst we were in the trenches expecting every minute a shell would burst upon us. I did have one, but luckily all the contents went forward.

No one can realise what it is like out here. It is a terrible sight to see the towns and villages in ruins, and the Germans seem as though they have made a special target of churches. I do wish this terrible war would soon end, but at the present it doesn’t seem as though it will. We are all looking for that time when we shall once more be on the shores of dear old England.…

Yours very sincerely,
Geo. H. Keene

Broad Street Congregational Church magazine, March 1915 (D/N11/12/1/14)

“The Moral Downfall of Germany and its Menace to the World”

Young people in Reading were treated to a fervent talk on the war, and the awfulness of Germany past and present, at Broad Street Chapel:

On Tuesday, February 9th, a lecture in connection with the Young People’s Union will be delivered by Rev. W J Farrow, BA, BD (Lond.), late of Reading. Subject: “The Moral Downfall of Germany and its Menace to the World”.

SYNOPSIS
Introduction; The German of Luther, Kant, Goethe, etc; Its moral greatness; Its political insignificance. Prussia prostrate before Napoleon. Fichte and his ideals. Learning from her conqueror; Clausewitz as teacher; beginnings of the doctrine of Militarism. Treitschke as prophet; His estimate of England; His dreams for Germany. Nietzsche as philosopher; His Gospel of the Superman. The Germany of the Kaiser, Von Bernhardi, Von Bulow, and Frobenius. Thwarting Peace; Forcing War. Policy of “Frightfulness”. Belgium in agony. England’s duty.

PRESS OPINIONS
“The Rev. W J Farrow gave a lecture of supreme interest. It was a tribute to Mr Farrow’s ability that despite the miserably cold, wet night, the hall was crowded. The lecture was marked by apt language and wide range of thought. In a fine peroration, etc.” Shrewsbury Chronicle
“An eloquent lecture of over an hour’s duration.” Border Counties Advertiser
“Before a crowded audience the Rev. W J Farrow delivered a masterly lecture.” The Wellington Journal

The chair will be taken at 8 o’clock by the Rev. W Morton Rawlinson.
Admission Free. Silver collection

Broad Street Congregational Church magazine, February 1915 (D/N11/12/1/14)

Soldiers’ gratitude for Christmas gifts from Broad Street

The wife of the minister of Broad Street Congregational Church, Reading, reports on the success of the church’s Christmas present scheme for “their” soldiers:

GIFTS TO OUR SOLDIERS
Mrs Rawlinson desires to thank most sincerely most friends who so generously responded to her appeal by sending Christmas gifts for out soldiers and sailors. With the help thus given she was able to send a parcel to almost everyone of the brave fellows who have gone out from our midst in response to the call of duty. The only exceptions were the two or three cases where no address could be obtained.

The benefactors will be glad to know that their gifts were warmly appreciated. Letters expressing heartfelt gratitude have been received from most of those who received the parcel. Mrs Rawlinson hopes to keep in touch with our soldier and sailor friends as far as possible, and she would be glad to forward to them from time to time any article of clothing, etc, which members of the congregation may wish to devote to such a purpose, and for which they may have no special claimant.

Broad Street Congregational Church magazine, January 1915 (D/N11/12/1/14)

Christmas gifts for soldiers

The war’s first Christmas promised to be a lonely experience for the young Britons in trenches or billets far from home. The good people of Broad Street Congregational Church were determined that their own members who had joined up should not be forgotten, and decided to send each of them a present. Underwear and gloves may not seem exciting today, but would have been a welcome surprise in the trenches. The church magazine tells more about the project, managed by the minister’s wife:

CHRISTMAS AND OUR SOLDIERS
Mrs Rawlinson invites the help of friends in sending a Christmas gift to each member of Broad Street congregation at present serving with the Forces, and, if possible, to each member of the Brotherhood who has enlisted. This would be too big an undertaking for one or two but with many helpers it would be quite easy, and we feel sure the helpers will be forthcoming.

Warm underclothing, gloves or other suitable articles will be gratefully received. So, too, will gifts of money, for the postage will be a serious item. Friends who can give any help in this way, whether much or little – are asked to send their gifts WITHOUT DELAY to Mrs Rawlinson, 50, Western Elms Avenue.

Broad Street Church magazine, December 1914 (D/N11/12/1/14)