A good moon

The Winkfield war memorial was under consideration.

February

PARISH MEMORIAL TO THE FALLEN.

A Public Meeting to discuss ideas and plans for erecting a suitable Memorial for Winkfield men who have died in the war, will be held in the Parish Room, on Wednesday, Feb. 12th, at 8 p.m.

There should be a good moon on that night, and we hope it will be a fine evening, and that as many as possible will attend.

March

PARISH MEMORIAL OF THE FALLEN

Notice of a Public Meeting to be held in the Parish Room, on Wednesday, Feb. 12th, in order to discuss ideas and plans for erecting a suitable memorial for Winkfield men, who have died in the freat war, was given in the February number of the Magazine; but unfortunately was printed so late that only a few received it in time to learn of the meeting, and the attendance was small.

The following resolutions were however unanimously passed:

(1.) That this meeting cordially approves the suggestion for a worthy and permanent memorial for the men of Winkfield who have made the supreme sacrifice during the War.

(2.) That whatever else may be done, a brass Memorial Tablet, inscribed with the names of Winkfield men who have fallen in the War should be set up in the Church.

Discussions took place as to the best form any further memorial should take, and three ideas was mooted.

(a.) That a Memorial Cross should be erected opposite the lych gate of the churchyard.

(b.) That the Parish Room should be improved and made more adaptable for meetings, entertainments, and all purposes of a village Institute.

(c.) That this parish should join with others in helping to enlarge the Ascot Cottage Hospital which is a great benefit to the District.

A Committee consisting of the Vicar and Wardens, Lord George Pratt and Messrs. S. G. Asher, and G. Brown and H. Harrison, was appointed to fully consider these proposals in all their bearings, and then to report to a public meeting to be called later.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, February-March 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/2)

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Westminster Chimes in the Tower or a Calvary or Crucifix in the Churchyard?

Newbury began to consider its war memorial.

A Meeting of Parishioners was held at the Parish Room on January 22nd to consider the question of a War Memorial to the memory of those fallen in the War. There was a fair attendance, though more might have been there. Various suggestions were brought forward and considerable discussion took place. Finally, it was decided to consider the putting of a Memorial of some kind in the Church to contain the names of the men; the putting of the Westminster Chimes in the Tower; and the erection of a Calvary or Crucifix in the Churchyard. For this a Committee was appointed, consisting of the following: the Rector and Churchwardens, The Mayor, Mr C Hawker, Mr G W Roberts, Mr D Geater, The Mayoress, Mrs L R Majendie, Mrs H E Pratt, Miss Godding, Miss Plows, Miss K Harrison, Miss L H Barnes, amd Miss P Belcher, with power to add to their number.

Newbury parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P89/28A/14)

These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War

A final list of the Wargrave men who served in the war. NB: where this symbol † appears in the list, an entry for this soldier exists in the corresponding supplement to follow.

ROLL OF HONOUR.

These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War.

Additions and Corrections for this Roll should be sent to the Vicar as soon as possible.

Adby, L.
Adby, C.
Adby, W.
Adby, O.
Alderton, F. J.
Allen, C. W.
Allum, H.
Amos, G.
Andrew, H.
Arnold, A. E.
Arnold, W.
Attlesey, H. F.
(more…)

“These things cannot be done in five minutes – but do you not think that nearly 4 months is rather a long delay?”

Sydney Spencer was increasingly frustrated that he was still on the home front.

Copy of a letter I sent to Brigadier General Pratt [sic?] commanding 208th Inf. Brigade at Doncaster on Easter Sunday March 31st 1918.

From The Brigade Gas Officer
208th Inf. Brigade

To the Commander
208th Inf. Brigade

Sir:

I have the honour to lay the following request before you hoping that it will meet with the great consideration which you have shewn at all times towards me in my rather unhappy position. May I be forgiven if for the moment I break through that necessary reserve which rightly exists between a junior subaltern & his General Officer Commanding, & write rather more openly than official language will allow, even being you, for the time being, as one who has seen more of life & service than I have lived years, & one who has shewn great sympathy & willingness to aid me towards the one great end to which I unceasingly look, rather than as my superior officer to whom I have no right to address the following in such terms as I am about to use.

Sir: both you & General Fortescue before you have done your best to get me overseas, & have rightly understood the unenviable position I am now in, & yet nothing has happened. My first definite application through the Brigade to the Division must have reached the division at about Christmas time. Since then other applications have gone in. Nothing has come of it. Lord Stanley, when he was with the Brigade, told me to be patient & that these things cannot be done in five minutes. I realize that, but do you not think that nearly 4 months is rather a long delay? Hence I feel driven to ask the following favour. May I be allowed an interview with the General Officer commanding the Division so that I may know what are his real feelings about my position.

General Fortescue, Colonel Harris told me in Sheffield last week, definitely stated that the taking up of my post as Brigade Gas Officer would in no way interfere with my going out as a SS officer should the opportunity arise. In five days time I shall have held my appointment 5 months. Six months is the full term of this office according to ACI Instructions. Frankly, Sir, if I have given satisfaction in my work, & if I have put enthusiasm into the Battalion Gas officers under me, & they have given me every support, as this last week has shewn, it is on my part, an enthusiasm born of an unceasing desire to keep from becoming despondent, & lose after nearly 3 years home service as a General Service Officer. May I hope that the length of this letter, & the language in which it is couched, has in no way given offence.

I have the honour, Sir,
To be
Your obedient servant

Sydney Spencer Lieut
Doncaster

31.3.13

Diary of Sydney Spencer of Cookham (D/EX801/12)

“The teachers might be trusted to give all necessary instruction”

On 4 January the Newbury Borough Education Committee had agreed to let the government’s new propaganda body talk to Newbury schoolchildren. But it proved to be controversial.

January 29 1918

Food Control Meat Ration

The Mayor mentioned the work of the Local Food Control Committee and the necessity which had arisen for restricting the supply of meat to 1 lb per head per week for all persons over 9 years of age, and ½ lb for those under that age, to be supplied on the production of the sugar tickets.

Education Committee

Alderman Rankin moved the adoption of the report of the 4th January, but expressed his disagreement with the clause in the report with reference to the sending by the South Berks Committee of the National War Aims Committee of a speaker to address the children of the Newbury Elementary Schools on the subject of National War Aims, seconded by Councillor Parfitt.

Alderman Rankin withdrew his motion for the adoption of the report, which was then moved by Councillor Stradling. Seconded by Councillor Parfitt.

Alderman Rankin then moved as an amendment,

“That the paragraph in the Education Committee’s report re War Aims Committee’s request be altered to read as follows: That when the proposed leaflet has been approved by the Education Committee, the Education Committee empowers them to recommend the teachers to explain to the Senior boys the War Aims as lately defined by the Prime Minister and President Wilson.

Seconded by Councillor Pratt.

Alderman Lucas supported the motion, and considered that the teachers might be trusted to give all necessary instruction to the children attending the schools. Councillors Geater and Parfitt opposed the amendment, which on being put, was carried, and the report as amended was then put and carried.

Newbury Borough Council minutes (N/AC1/2/9)

A most successful Red Cross Sale

Newington House is a grand house still standing in Winkfield, and with a lovely garden. It made a delightful spot for a sale to raise funds for the Red Cross.

WINKFIELD WAR ASSOCIATION

On June 27th a most successful Red Cross Sale, organised by Mrs. Harrison was held in the grounds of Newington House. There were four stalls, the stall-holders being Mesdames Empson, Clark, A. Elliott, Druce, Hayes-Saddler, Miller, Simpson-Baikie, and Wilder. Other helpers were Miss Duchesne, Miss Aris, Miss Wells, Mr. Harris, Mr. Wainwright, and Lord George Pratt, who raffled a number of things with great success. Goods were kindly given by Messrs. Langley, Lawrence Stores, Sandwith and Wainwright. It was a perfect afternoon, and about 200 people attended, the sale resulting in the raising of a very satisfactory £46.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, August 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/8)

The cost of food and other commodities has more than doubled since the commencement of the war

Berkshire policemen were given a pay rise to cope with war conditions.

21 April 1917

The Clerk referred to the death of Lieut-Col Thorne, the Deputy Clerk of the Peace, who had been killed in action near Arras on 9 April, while in command of a battalion of the Royal Scots.

Resolved on the motion of Lord George Pratt, seconded by Sir R. D. Acland, knight, KC: That a letter of condolence be sent to the widow of rhe late Deputy Clerk of the Peace.

Police Constable 212, Frederick Charles Kimmer, has been called upon to join the Army, being under 23 years of age.

War Bonus

The cost of food and other commodities which has more than doubled since the commencement of the war, is being felt very seriously at the present rate of pay and bonus. The rate of pay of a Constable on joining, together with the 3/- war bonus, amounts to 26/11 per week, in addition to the incidental advantages he obtains in the way of clothing, boots, rent, rates and pension, and, in the case of single Constables, bedding, fuel and light.

Information has been obtained from all the County forces in England … and, placing the wages and war bonus with others… Berkshire compares very unfavourably with others… only 6 county forces coming beneath it.

Taking everything into consideration, the Committee recommend the following extra war bonus to all ranks .. to commence from 1 April, 1917, be payable until three months after the conclusion of the war…

32 per week for each member
1s per week for wife
6d per week for each child under the age of 15 years

It is estimated that the extra cost would be about £2,550.

Adopted.

Standing Joint Committee minutes (C/CL/C2/1/5)

Funds are urgently needed to reinstate the farmers who have been entirely ruined in the countries of our Allies, Belgium, France, Serbia, Poland, &c

Vast swathes of farmland in the contested territories had been ravaged by the fighting. Berkshire farmers, safe at home, wanted to help out.

BRACKNELL

It is announced that an Agricultural Jumble Sale will be held at Bracknell on October 19th, at 11 a.m., in aid of the Agricultural Relief to Allies Fund and the British Farmers’ Red Cross Fund. Contributions of Live and Dead Stock, Furniture, &c. should be notified to the Hon. Secretaries, Messrs. F.W. Hunton & Son, and donations can be paid to them or to P. Crutchley, Esq., Ascot, the Treasurer.

CRANBOURNE

We have been asked to mention that an Agricultural Jumble Sale will be held at Bracknell on October 19th, at 11 a.m., in aid of the “Agricultural Relief to Allies Fund” and the “British Farmers’ Red Cross Fund.” We believe a letter stating the objects of the Fund has been widely distributed, so we need say nothing more than express the hope that contributions any kind of Live and Dead Stock, articles of Furniture, &c will be made by members of the Parish.

These contributions should be notified to Messrs. F.W. Hunton & Son, the Hon. Secretaries, Bracknell, and donations of money may be paid to A.H.S. Elliott, Esq., N. Fitzroy, Esq., or Mr. F. W. Bowyer, who form the Winkfield Committee.

WINKFIELD

NOTICE.

Agricultural Relief to Allies Fund and the British Farmers’ Red Cross Fund.-

We are asked to let our readers know that the Agricultural Jumble Sale in aid of the above, will be held at Bracknell on October 19th, at 11 a.m. The Committee, under the Chairmanship of Lord George Pratt, appeal for help to make the sale a success, by the sending of any kind of Live and Dead Stock, articles of furniture, &c. to be sold.

Funds are urgently needed to reinstate the farmers who have been entirely ruined in the countries of our Allies, Belgium, France, Serbia, Poland, &c, and also to help the Red Cross Society, which has been doing such noble work during the war.

It is proposed to print in the Catalogue the name of each donor, afterwards advising him what his gift realised. The local Committee for Winkfield are Messrs. A.H.S. Elliott, N. Fitzroy, and F. W. Bowyer, who will furnish any further information required.

WARFIELD

It is proposed to hold an Agricultural Jumble Sale at Bracknell on October 19th, at 11 a.m., in aid of the Agricultural Relief to Allies Fund and the British Farmers’ Red Cross Fund. All articles of furniture etc. Live and Dead Stock or donations will be acceptable and all donations can be paid to Mr. R. Crow, Mr. H. Crocker, Mr. R. Lawrence, or Mr. Smewing. Other contributions in kind should be notified to Messrs. F.W. Hunton & Son, Bracknell.

Winkfield District Magazine, October 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/10)

Comforts and Christmas cheer for those brave men nobly fighting for King and Country

People in Winkfield energetically raised funds for Christmas presents to send to serving soldiers from the area.

THE RUMMAGE SALE in the Parish Room on November 9th was a great success. Although the weather was abominable it did not seem to deter people from coming, for immediately on opening the room was crowded with buyers.

Lord George Pratt who had most kindly conveyed the goods from the Vicarage to the Parish Room, was also good enough to open the sale. In a few well chosen words he explained how anxious we were that the effort so successfully made last Christmas by Miss Montgomerie to raise funds for providing Christmas presents to our own men absent on Service should be repeated this year. Unfortunately we were losing the Miss Montgomeries from the parish, but Mrs. Maynard had undertaken to do her best to procure the necessary funds and see to the sending off of the presents. As however this year the number of men serving was greater and a larger sum must be provided, Mrs. Maynard had got up to this rummage sale in the hope that the proceeds would go a long way towards meeting the necessary expense.

He therefore urged those present to remember that by becoming purchasers they would be helping to provide comforts and Christmas cheer for those brave men from our parish who were nobly fighting for King and Country. We had contributed a fair share of men to this great cause, and, as one of the Recruiting Committee for East Berkshire, he hope that more still would follow their example.

His Lordship then declared the sale open and business commenced at once. All present availed themselves eagerly of the bargain prices, and sales were so brisk that in about an hour there was very little left, and the few articles that hung fire were for the most part quickly disposed of by Lord George, who made an excellent amateur auctioneer.

The receipts amounted to £12 13s. 8d. and inclusive of £4 10s. 0d., donations from some kind friends who could not send goods, a total of £17 3s. 8d. was raised and Mrs. Maynard is much to be congratulated on the result of her efforts. She begs to cordially thank all those who so kindly sent donations and articles for sale and also those ladies and gentlemen who helped her to classify and price the things, or assisted at various stalls.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, December 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/12)

Setting up a War Agricultural Committee for the county

Food shortages were a real concern during the war, as German attacks on neutral ships impeded imports. At its meeting on 16 October 1915, Berkshire County Council decided to set up a War Agricultural Committee.

FOOD PRODUCTION
WAR AGRICULTURAL COMMITTEE
A letter, dated 18 September, 1915, addressed to the Chairman of the Council by the President of the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries, forwarding a Scheme for the appointment of a War Agricultural Committee and district sub-committees, was considered.
The principal functions of the Committees will be to organise the supply of agricultural labour; to consider the maintenance of, and if possible, the increase in, the production of food; to obtain information as to the requirements and supply available of agricultural implements and fertilisers and feeding stuffs; and generally to assist and advise landowners, farmers, and labourers.

Proposed by the Chairman, seconded by Lord G M Pratt, and resolved: That the following, being representative of landowners, farmers, agricultural societies and institutions, labour and other persons, be appointed a War Agricultural Committee for the County of Berks in accordance with, and for the purposes enumerated in, the circular dated 18 September, 1915, from the Board of Agriculture; with power to add to their number:

F Anstey
F Bate
J H Benyon
W Brewer
William Cordell
F J K Cross
R Crow
P E Crutchley
Miss G Elliot
C A Ferard
J A Fereman
Aaron Frogley
E Gardner, MP
H Goddard
B C Heath
W J Henman
T Latham
A W Lawrence
Local Manager, Labour Exchange
Capt. F C Loder Symonds
Job Lousley
W A Mount, MP
W Pennington
Miss G Pott
A Robinson
T Rose
Frank Saunders
W Anker Simmons
T Skurray
G F Slade
F A Smith
Harry Wilson Sowdon
E M Sturges
T S Tayler
Rev F W Thoyts
W Weall
H W Weaving
H G Willink

Proposed by the Chairman, seconded by Mr Bate, and resolved:

That the Clerk of the Council be nominated, and authorised to act, as Clerk to the War Agricultural Committee for the County of Berks; and that such other members of the administrative staff of the Council, as may be available and required, be allowed to assist such Committee.

That the War Agricultural Committee be allowed the use of County Buildings and equipment free of cost.

Provided that the above authorisations are given on condition that the arrangements do not interfere with the ordinary work of the Council or their Committees.

BCC minutes (C/CL/C1/1/18)

Three teeth lost to a hostile aircraft

The Standing Joint Committee which oversaw the Berkshire Constabulary met on 9 October 1915 to consider various war-related matters, including an unfortunate accident resulting from the shock of an air raid, whetehr the Chief Constable should abandon his job to take up a role with the army.

A circular having been received from the Board of Trade (Railway Department) dated 6th September, 1915, addressed to Council Authorities, recommending that every effort should be made to accumulate stocks of coal in consequence of the probability that, owing to the number of miners who have joined the colours, the supply for home consumption next winter will be less than usual, instructions were issued to Superintendents to purchase sufficient coal to last the winter (or partly so) if it could be properly stored.

Accident to Special Constable G. E. Loader
The Divisional Officer, Berks Special Reserve, Wokingham Division, has reported that Special Constable G. E. Loader met with a serious accident on 13th September, 1915, while proceeding to his post on an alarm being given as to the approach of hostile aircraft. He ran into a post in the dark and injured his jaw, three teeth being knocked out, which he is having replaced by new ones. I beg to recommend that as the accident happened when on duty, the cost of the new teeth should be paid for out of the Police Fund. The amount would be £1. 19s. 4d.
Recommended for approval. (more…)

The men of Earley serving their country

An extremely long list of men with connections with Earley St Peter were receiving the support of parishioners’ prayers.

List of Names on the Roll of Honour and Prayer List
Duncan Adams, John Adams, Henry Adams, Frederick Allen, John Allen, Frank Allum, George Allum, George Ansell, Robert Ascroft, Frank Aust, William Ayres, Henry Ayres, Cyril Ayres, Reggie Ayres, John Ayres, James Auger, Samuel Auld, Charles Barton, William Barton, Clarence Burnett, Harry Bosley, Benjamin Bosley, Robert Beeson, Walter Bluring, Gordon Brown, Leonard Brown, Walter Brooker, Charles Baker, Ernest Balding, Albert Ballard, George Breach, Phillip Breach, Ernest Breach, Alfred Breach, Percy Bunday, George Bungay, William Bungay, Charles Bolton, Herbert Blyde, Lewis Blyde, Wilfrid Blyde, Arthur Buskin, Herbert Broadbear, Louis Bunce, Frank Berry, James Bowden, Henry Blathwayt, Harold Bennett, Harry Borroughs, Henry Barney, William Brett, Alfred Broad, Harry Ching, Charles Chesterman, George Chesterman, Ernest Chapman, Edwin Coldman, Edward Cottrell, Percy Cotterell, Hubert Collier, Alfred Cooper, George Comport, Guy Comport, Frank Cook, Ernest Cook, Eric Cook, Fernand Camus, John Cane, Charles Carpenter, Charles Clarke, William Clements, Charles Carpenter, Charles Clarke, William Clements, Charles Capel, Leonard Dann, Frederick Douglas, Reuben Dowsett, Renton Dunlop, Tom Durman, Jack Durman, Hugh Deeds, Ralph Deeds, Sidney Davis, Ralph Durand, Albert Denham, Frederick Dawson, Alfred Dee, Hugh Denton, Sidney Dormer, William Elliott, Charles Elliott, Reginald Elliott, Eric Evans, Alec Evans, Ernest Embery, Cyril Eaton, Eustace Finnes, George Forge, John Forge, Henry Fisher, George Fisher, William Fisher, John Fisher, George Fulford, Bernard Fixsen, Theodore Fixsen, William Farmer, Bert Farmer, Arthur Fulker, Cecil Fowler, William Fowles, Charles Goddard, Guy Goodliffe, Ernest Gowers, George Grey, Cecil Grey, Victor Gaines, Reginald Gatehouse, Herbert Garlick, Charles Phillips Groome, Samual Gould, Wilfrid George, Frank George, Gilbert Green, Frederick Goodger, Richard Goodall, Leslie Grinstead, Albert Howlett, Frederick Hearn, Arthur Hearn, Bert Hearn, Harry Harding, George Harding, Albert Harwood, William Harwood, George Harwood, Charles Haines, George Hitchcock, Albert Hitchcock, Henry Hayward, Percy Hamilton, Frank Hawkins, Albert Hosler, William Hall, Albert Hall, Henry Hall, George Hall, William Hall, Francis Harris, Arthur Harris, Richard Hayden, Fred Hull, Charles Hague, James Hague, Stanley Higgs, Leslie Heelas, Leonard Hedges, Harry Hambleton, Reginald Hawes, William Hope, Jack Howlett, Percy Howlett, Bertie Iles, Edward Iles, Percy Ilott, Thomas Ilott, Albert Ilott, Melville Innes, Walter Jeskins, Albert Jerome, Alfred Jerome, Walter Jerome, Frederick Jerome, George Jerome, Charles Jefferies, Henry Jones, Leopold Jenner, William Jeram, George Jeram, Henry Jeram, Woolf Joel, Alfred Jacobs, (more…)

Lantern lectures on the war

Lectures on the war were offered to both civilians and servicemen in Winkfield.

PARISH NOTES
C. E. M. S.
The usual monthly meeting was held at the Vicarage on Wednesday, Dec. 18th at 8.15 p. m. After joining in Intercessions for the War… the Vicar then explained that he was anxious to make the great day of National Intercession on Jan. 3rd as widely known as possible, and it was arranged that, as the magazine would come out too late for the purpose, the members should take round a special letter on the subject to every household in the parish.

The members are to be congratulated on the success of their house to house collection for the Belgian Refugee Fund, since their efforts resulted in the raising of £17 1s. 10d.

We have now sent up to this fund the sum of £22 13s. 10d., made up as follows:
£ s. d.
C. E. M. S. collection 17 1 10
Donation from Choir Men 2 0 0
Choir Girls of S. Mary the Less (in lieu of having their Annual Treat on Nov. 5th) 1 10 0
Offertory at Church Parade (Dec. 6) 2 2 0

A Public Lecture on the War, illustrated by 80 Lantern Views was given on Dec. 2nd in the Parish Room at 8 o’clock when the chair was taken by Lord George Pratt. The members of the C. E. M. S. worked hard to sell the tickets, with the result that the attendance was very good, and after all expenses had been paid the sum of £4 8s. 4d. was sent to the Prince of Wales Fund.

Another War Lecture entitled “How the British soldier fights” was given on Dec. 15th. This was a free lecture for “service men” only and about 70 attended.

Our warm thanks are due to the Secretary of the C. E. M. S. for kindly working the lantern at both these lectures.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Monthly Magazine, January 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/1)