“I feel that I have lost a friend in addition to a very gallant officer”

There was sad news for a number of Wargrave families.

The following names must be added to the Roll of Honour:-

Ogbourne, Harry.
Trooper 1st Life Guards, died of wounds due to enemy air raid, May 20th, 1818, aged 24. He was the youngest son of Mrs. Ogbourne, widow of John Ogbourne of Wargrave. He was educated at the Piggott School, Wargrave and the Knowl Hill School. Before the war, he was engaged as Assistant to the Lock-keeper at Shiplake Lock. He volunteered in October, 1914. He was sent to France in May 1915, and with two short periods of leave, he remained there until his death. His Squadron Leader gave him a most excellent report.

Sinclair, Gerald John.
Captain, 1st Battalion The Black Watch, only son of John Sinclair, was educated at Rugby, and joined the Inns of Court O.T.C.in September, 1914, from there going to Sandhurst in January, 1915. He joined the reserve Battalion in Scotland, in July, 1915, and went out to France in April, 1916, where he was wounded in Peronne, in July. He returned to France the following January. He was 21 on March 21st, 1918, was killed in action on April 18th, and was buried in the Military Cemetery at Givenchy. His Colonel wrote “I feel that I have lost a friend in addition to a very gallant officer.”

Woodruff, Charles Herbert.

Lance-Corporal 2nd Royal Berks, killed in action between April 22nd and 27th, 1918, aged 24. He was the youngest son of Mrs. Woodruff, widow of George Woodruff, who was cowman at Scarlets for twenty-two years. He was a Piggott Scholar and on leaving school he went to work under a gardener. Before the War he was an under-gardener at the Lodge, Hare Hatch. He volunteered on August 30th, 1914. He was stationed in Ireland for three years with the 4th Queen’s Own Hussars, but in 1917 he was transferred by his own desire to the Royal Berks in order that he might share in the fighting. He was sent to France, June 1st, 1917.

Missing.

The following are the names of those who are now missing:-

Burton Haycock, John Frame, Frank Heakes, James Hes, Arthur Haycock.

Prisoners.

The following are prisoners:-

Robert Burrough, Fred Hall, Albert Hodge, Henry Wise, Charles Crampton, Jack Gieves, James Pithers, George Woodruff.

O Lord, look down from heaven, behold, visit, and with the eyes of thy mercy, give them comfort and sure confidence in Thee, defend them from the danger of the enemy, and keep them in perpetual peace and safety; through Jesus Christ our Lord, Amen.

Wargrave parish magazine, August 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

Armageddon

The vicar of Wargrave set out his view son the war and the future.

Armageddon:

When this Magazine is printed and issued we may know a great deal more about the fortunes of the great battles on the Western Front, but at present the whole weight of the German offensive has been hurled against the British line. Vast numbers of men have been concentrated so as to give the enemy a great preponderance on particular sections. Our men have everywhere fought with the utmost gallantry for long hours, they have borne up against almost impossible odds, they have exacted a heavy toll for any tract of ground that they have yielded. But, at the moment, the enemy has broken through the defensive line which was held when the battle began on March 21st and the breach which was made south of St Quentin, has enforced a retirement of the whole line. At one point the withdrawal has been for a distance of fifteen miles. Our armies now hold the line running due south from the Scarpe, reaching the Somme near Peronne. We have given up about two-thirds of the country evacuated by the enemy over a year ago. The spirit of our men is magnificent, their confidence unshaken, their line is not pierced. That is the position so far as we know it this morning, March 25th 1918.

There is nothing in life so uncertain as the fortunes of War. We pray to God for victory and we pray that in His mercy He will give us a speedy and decisive victory. We are praying for such an issue to the War as shall advance His kingdom. But victory may be long delayed; we may yet have to sustain more serious trials than any that have at present befallen us. Let us then be strong and of a good courage. The fortune of war is uncertain, but there is no uncertainty about the ultimate issue. God overrules all things in heaven and earth. He is working His purpose out. He calls men to co-operate with Him, allows us men to be fellow workers with Him, He, who gave men freewill, allows men also to obstruct His purpose by their gainsaying wickedness. But no creature can frustrate His purpose. The time may be long, as we reckon history, but the issue is certain. His Kingdom will come and the earth shall be full of knowledge of the Lord as the waters cover the sea.

We are fighting against forces which are ranged with the world, the flesh, and the devil to win dominion by blood and iron. Such an empire is clean contrary to the Kingdom of God. It abuses power for such oppression as is seen in Belgium, Servia, and Armenia to-day. It may have its day as other empires of the world have done. It was long before Pharoah let the people go, but the night came when the Lord brought them out thence through a mighty hand and by a stretched out arm.

So whatever may befall us in the uncertain ebb and flow of battle fortunes, we have set our feet upon a rock. “Fear not, little flock, for it is your Father’s good pleasure to give you the Kingdom”.

Wargrave parish magazine, April 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)