These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War

A final list of the Wargrave men who served in the war. NB: where this symbol † appears in the list, an entry for this soldier exists in the corresponding supplement to follow.

ROLL OF HONOUR.

These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War.

Additions and Corrections for this Roll should be sent to the Vicar as soon as possible.

Adby, L.
Adby, C.
Adby, W.
Adby, O.
Alderton, F. J.
Allen, C. W.
Allum, H.
Amos, G.
Andrew, H.
Arnold, A. E.
Arnold, W.
Attlesey, H. F.
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Saluting the Roll of Honour of Old Scouts now serving in H.M.’s Forces

Boys joining the Scouts were not just having fun – they anticipated possible military service.

Several friends attended a Parade of the Windsor Forest Boy Scouts which was held on the Sunday School, on Saturday, June 22nd, when the following scouts were admitted after passing the tests of a tenderfoot. A. Kleinod, H. Hyde, R. Harrington, F. Fasey, J. Robb, A. Johnson, W. Prior, H. Welch, M. Adams, E. Payne. Mr. Asher very kindly presented the badges and Miss Ducat (a Scout Mistress) the certificate of admission. The troop was formed into a semi-circle as each Scout made the Scout’s promise, which is as follows: “I promise on my honour to do my duty to God and the King, to help other people at all times and to obey the Scout Law.” Mr. Asher then addressed the troop with kindly words of encouragement, and said he trusted each Scout would at all times remember their promise. The troop then did some staff and cart drill, and after saluting the Roll of Honour of Old Scouts now serving in H.M.’s Forces, the proceedings ended with the national anthem.

Cranbourne section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, July 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/6)

One of life’s failures

St Augustine’s Home was a home for boys in need in Clewer, run by the Sisters of the Community of St John Baptist. It was not strictly speaking an orphanage, as many of the lads had at least one parent living, but they were usually in dire circumstances, and the home gave them stability. Many of the Old Boys were now serving in the armed forces, while the current residents were making little jigsaw puzzles to send to PoWs and the wounded.

A Short Notice of St Augustine’s Home for Boys, Clewer, December 1917

Roll of Honour, 1917
On Active Service

Robert Annesley
Reginald Barber
Frank Berriman
Arthur Booker
Leonard Borman
John Brown
Frank Bungard
William Carter
Percy Cattle
Robert Chippington
George Collyer
Tom Corbett
Jack Corbett
Herbert Cousins
Thomas Cox
Francis Dawes
Charles Douglas
Wilfrid Eccles
Jack Ettall
Edward Farmer
James Frame
James Farmer
Charles Fisher
Wallis Fogg
George Finlay
George Gale
Stanley Graham
Robert Gosling
John Green
John Harrison
George Houston
Ernest Howells
Fred Hunt
Albert Hudson
Arthur Hudson
William Hobart
Albert Jarman
Reginald Jarman
Joseph Kelly
Edward Lewendon
Harry Macdonald
Eric Matthews
Harry Mott
Norman Neild
Alfred Newsome
Robert Parnell
Samuel Perry
Bennie Payne
William Potter
Charles Price
George Pitt
William Robert
Claude Roebuck
Alan Sim
George Simister
Thomas Small
William Smith
Thomas Squibb
Alfred Stroud
George Tate
Graham Taylor
Albert Turnham
Jack Ware
William White
Albert Wicks
Leonard Wicks
William Wicks
Harry Wilden
Edwin Williams
Albert Worth
Leslie Worters
Fred Wright
Seldon Williams


At Rest

Walter Bungard
Albert Braithwaite
Harry Clarke
Joseph Eaves
Russell Evans
Ernest Halford
Frank Lewis
Douglas Matthews
James Matthews
Harry Pardoe
Arthur Smith
Maurice Steer
Thomas Tuckwell
Harry Worsley
RIP

..
A Home for Boys has a special claim on the interest of all at this time, when so many are being left orphans as a result of the war, or who are temporarily without a father’s care and discipline, and letters come very frequently containing requests for information as to the admission and maintenance of boys at St Augustine’s….

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Killed and wounded in recent battles

The impact of the war was beginning to hit home in Reading, with the relentless news of losses and severe wounds.

The Vicar’s Notes
Thanksgivings

For successes granted to the united efforts of the Allies.

All Saint’s District

The following additional names have been sent in for remembrance at the Altar.

Archibald Wren Carter, Royal Claude Wilson, Leslie Charles Frank Payne, Harry Edgar Hopcroft, Frederick Reginald Johnson.

R.I.P.

Frederick Painter, who was a signaller in the 2/4th Royal Berks, was we regret to hear, killed on July 21st. His brother Tom, it will be remembered, was killed at Givenchy on April the 15th, 1915. We now hear that Arthur, another brother, Corporal in the 1/4th Royal Berks, is missing, and believed killed. Our heartfelt sympathy is with Mr, and Mrs. Painter their parents, 4 Dover street, and with their family. It is a great anxiety to Mrs. Arthur Painter.

Also Albert Day, Arthur Day, George Grant, and Leonard Charles Monney, have been killed in the recent battles in France, leaving widows and children to mourn their loss. We assure them of our sympathy.

The wounded, we are glad to hear, are doing well, even George Gaines whose legs have been so badly damaged by a shell. We are sorry to hear that Cecil Allen is reported missing.

Our War intercessions on Wednesday afternoon and Sunday evening continue as usual.

Reading St Mary parish magazine, September 1916 (D/P98/28A/13)

Christmas parcels

There was an interdenominational effort in Bracknell to co-ordinate sending Christmas gifts to the men at the front.

Christmas parcels have been sent to all the men who are on active service both in the Navy and the Army. The Chavey Down men received their parcels through the working party on the Down. The members of the Congregational Church and P.S.A. sent to those connected with their organizations, and the remainder, about 70 in number, were provided for by subscriptions contributed by many in Bracknell.

Grateful letters of acknowledgement have come from a large number of the men, who desire the Vicar to thank all the Bracknell friends who contributed; the contents of the parcels seem to have been much appreciated.

The parcels were packed by Mrs. Barnett at the Vicarage, with the kind assistance of Mr. Payne and Miss Hunton. The contents of the parcels were such things as biscuits in tins, cake, Oxo, potted meat, milk and cocoa, chocolate, apples, soap, candles and cigarettes.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Monthly Magazine, January 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/1)

Pray for calmness, endurance, unity and resolution

The vicar of Reading St Giles invited parishioners to pray for our Russian allies. The Russians had had a bad summer’s fighting, and were in full retreat on Poland and Lithuania.

The Vicar’s Notes

Intercessions

For God’s blessing on our dedication festival.
For success to be granted to our Russian allies.
For calmness, endurance, unity and resolution amongst our own people.

Roll of Honour

George Brindley Aufrere Baker. Robert Thatcher Beckensdale. James Melmouth Du Buisson. David Butler. John Markham Carter. Charles Henry Coventry. Harold Frank Cross. Roy Cuddeford. Frank Cuddeford. William Warren Goddard. Hugh Hart. Percival Herbert Higgins. Reginald Edward Kemble. Albert George Charles Payne. Alan Nelson Philbrick. Charles Frederick Louis Rouff. Frederick Henry Griffith Russell. George Henry Victor Saunders. Alfred Ernest Smith. Rupert Stephens. Godfrey Stevens. Arthur Wooliams.

Reading St Mary parish magazine, September 1915 (D/P98/28A/13)
September 1915

Both sides are thoroughly weary of the war

The Newbury parish magazine reports a wearied mood regarding the war. Little did they know how much more they would have to endure.

The War still goes on, and it would be true to say that both sides are thoroughly weary of it. Still we must try to be patient, and trust in persevering prayer, not that we may attempt to make our will prevail, but in order that we may bring ourselves and our Nation to a right state of mind, and that means a state of penitence and of love for God. And let us trust Him to work His Purposes out in His own wide way. The services on August 4th were pretty well attended, there being 59 communicants at the Celebrations, but we must keep on praying and must be very regular at our devotions, both private and public.

The War Litany continues to be said at the Church on Thursdays at noon, and we should like to see more present there, and at the Celebrations during the week, which afford a special opportunity for intercession. There is also a weekly litany at St Hilda’s Mission Room on Tuesday nights at 8 pm, at which we have a small but regular congregation.

We are having just now a congregation of 300 or more men at our Church Parade Service, and the SPCK Soldiers’ Service Books, authorised for use by the Chaplain General, have been kindly lent us by Major C Abbot-Brown, Commanding ASC. It is grand to see so many men together at Church.

The Rector has had another letter from Mr Streatfeild at the Front: he is not allowed to publish these, but may say that they give interesting details of a Chaplain’s work – and they may remind us that the Clergy at the Seat of War, as well as the men whom they serve, stand in constant need of our prayers in their all-important duties. The last letter was written “under a waggon shelter waiting for the rain to stop”.

We should like to express our sincerest sympathy with Mrs S Payne of 2 Bartholomew Place, in the very severe loss of two of her sons through the war. A third son has been badly wounded, and a fourth has been given a Commission, while she has also two step-sons serving. In addition to this Mr S Payne himself has gone out to the seat of war to dig trenches. This is a remarkable record of loyalty, and well worthy of imitation.

We are glad to know that the Soldiers’ Club at St George’s continues to flourish, and is much appreciated by the men who use it, as is shown by the gratitude which they express personally, and in letters after they have left. At the Church Parade Service one Sunday a collection was made for the expenses of the Club.

Newbury parish magazine, September 1915 (D/P89/28A/13)

Why should the young do all the fighting and the dying and offer the great sacrifice by themselves?

The people of Winkfield were urged to support the young men who were heading to the Front.

VICAR’S LETTER

MY DEAR FRIENDS,

When you receive this Magazine we shall be nearing the completion of a year of War, and this fact cannot fail to solemnize in our minds and make us seriously consider whether we are one and all doing our duty in this supreme crisis of our Nation’s history.

The call to service and sacrifice has been answered by numbers of our young men – a list of whom is printed in this month’s Magazine – but have we who are unable to offer ourselves for active service contributed all we can and ought to the common cause? As the Bishop of London says, why should the young do all the fighting and the dying and offer the great sacrifice by themselves? The sacrifice that is for all should be offered by all, and all are bound to make the resolution “I will pray, I will repent, I will serve, I will save.”

And yet we must sorrowfully confess that the army of intercessors to offer prayer as sacrificial as the self-oblation of the millions of men who have offered themselves for war, has not been forthcoming; unlike France or Russia, out Churches have not been filled with men and women to pray for the men whose peril and blood is their shield, and I must confess to much heart sickness and disappointment that even our intercessory services in the second Sunday evenings and the last Sunday mornings in the month have not been better attended.

What is the explanation? It cannot be that we are indifferent to our country’s need or without love to our brothers at the Front; nor is it that England does not believe in God; there is enough love of our country and enough belief in God to crowd our Churches with earnest suppliants. What then is lacking? Is it not the belief in prayer and especially the belief in united supplication in God’s house? Is not the lack of this the reason why the men and women who ought to be in the praying line have not proved so steadfast as the men in the fighting line, who so greatly need our prayers, and surely have a right to expect them.

I sincerely hope therefore that large numbers will make a real and special effort to attend the special Intercession Services on Wednesday, August 4th and on Sunday, August 8th, of which notice is given in another column. The result of this war will depend very largely on the atmosphere of prayer which has been created, for prayer is the strongest force in the world, and as has been truly said, through prayer we bring our nation and our Allies into contact with Christ, and set the life of the whole Society as well as individuals in the stream of that purpose of redemptive love which can overrule even war for God.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,
H. M. MAYNARD.

PARISH NOTES

Lieut. Godfrey Loyd and Private Henry Hoptroff have just gone to the Front, and Privates Edwin Gray, Ernest Gray, Edward Holloway and Lance-Corporal Reginald Nickless are under orders to be in readiness to go immediately. We trust that they and their naturally anxious relatives will have a place in our prayers.

Much sympathy is felt for the family of Private John Williams (Royal Field Artillery) who died in hospital after a very long and distressing illness. He was buried with full military honours at Cosham Cemetery on July 1st, and special memorial prayers were said for him on Sunday, July 4th.

NOTICE

On Wednesday, 4th August, the anniversary of the declaration of war, a great service in St. Paul’s Cathedral has been arranged, when the King and all the leaders of the nation will attend to inaugurate the second year of the war be asking God’s help. In Winkfield Church, there will be Celebration of the Holy Communion at 8 a.m., and Litany and Intercession at 11 a.m. Also Evensong and Intercession at S. Mary the Less at 7.30 p.m.

On Sunday, August 8th, both morning and evening, there will be special services with Intercessions and Thanksgivings for the way in which the country has been preserved from many dangers.

The following is list of Winkfield men serving in His Majesty’s Forces at Home and Abroad.
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Entertaining the Army Service Corps in Earley

Parishioners at Earley St Peter entertained the Army Service Corps men billeted locally, while worrying about their own loved ones at the front.

Report of C.E.M.S. Soldiers’ Entertainment Committee.

The generosity of the Parish enabled the committee to give Twelve entertainments to the 178th Co. of the A.S.C.; the subscribers being the Rev. Canon Fowler, Major M. Hull, Messers. Allen, Bennett, Bastow, S.O. Bastow, Beldam, Bartlett, Culham, Friedlander, Farrow, Goodenough, Goodyer, Hawkes, Hart, Heelas, Howlett, Jordan, Jones, Keep, Lee, J.Lewington, Love, Masser, Murton, Newbery, Rushbrook, Smith, Martin, Sutton, Sargeant, Tagg, Tomlin, Wilson, Wooldridge, White, Webb, Wait; Mesdames Blyde, Barkshire, Dunlop, Fowles, Friends, Goodyer, Hawkes, Hawkins, Lawrence, Montizambert, Payne, Shaw, Stroud, Southern, Wyley, Warmington, Witherington; the Misses Beauchamp, Corner, Croome, Carlsson, Davis, George, Goodwin, Hannaford, Keep, Maurice, Miller, Montizambert, Stroud, Taunton.

It is proposed to continue the entertainments for the 263rd Co., at present billeted in the Parish, but to make this possible a further appeal for funds must be made, and I shall be very grateful for any subscriptions.

List of Men Serving in His Majesty’s Forces.

The following additional names have been added to our prayer list:- Richard Goodall, Charles Carpenter, Ernest Threadgill, James Winchcombe, Leonard Reeves, William Farmer, Andrew McFadyen, Edward Iles, Arthur Buskin, Stephen Platt, Percy Taylor, Arthur Harris, George Palmer, George Webb, Frank Snellgrove, Richard Hayden, George Rogers, William Mengham, Jack Durman, Guy Comport, Herbert Broadbear.

In addition to those already mentioned we especially commend the following to your prayers:-
Killed – Haviland Durand, Edward Smithers, Thomas Palmer; Sick – Arthur Mylam (gas poisoning).

Earley St Peter parish magazine, July 1915 (D/P191/28A/22)

Two more men have laid down their lives

There was sad news of more Winkfield men.

PARISH NOTES

Two more men from our parish have laid down their lives for their country. Private Ernest Thurmer (2nd Royal Berks) and Private Frank Payne (2nd Life Guards) were killed in action in May.

Memorial prayers were said for Ernest Thurmer on Sunday, June 13th, and for Frank Payne on Sunday, June 27th.

We trust that many will remember in prayer and sympathy their sorrowing relatives.

Privates George Benstead, Fred Holmes and Wallace Nickless of 5th Royal Berks, and Walter Woodage of 5th Royal Fusiliers have just gone to the front and will we trust be remembered in our prayers.

Private Harry Ottaway (3rd Dragoon Guards) is wounded in the hand and leg, but is doing well in hospital.

Private Albert Carter (1st Royal Berks) is in hospital and there is good hope that the leg will be saved.

Corporal Horace Blunden (2nd Life Guards) was wounded in the leg; the shrapnel bullet has not yet been extracted, but he is now out of hospital, and we were glad to see him in Church on June 20th, and wish him a speedy and complete recovery.

Private John Williams’ long illness has not yet taken a turn for the better, and since his relapse his condition has been critical. All our sympathies must go out to his family in the long strain of this anxiety.

We have to more names to add this month to our list of Honour, George Faithful and Ernest Faithful having joined the 3rd battalion of the Royal Berks.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, July 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/5)

Wargrave’s roll of honour

Wargrave was one of many parishes to publish a list of men serving in the parish magazine. This allowed parishioners at home to pray for them all by name.

‘The Roll of Honor for the Parish of Wargrave

The Royal Navy
Bywater, Darol. Lieut. R.N.D
Grey, Thomas Robinson. Sub-Lieut., R.N.A.A.V.C.
Blackburn, Ernest. H.M.S. Glory
Bucker, J. H.M.S. Laurel
Carr, Joseph, Fireman. Transport
Clarke, William. H.M.S. Laconia
Coleman, Charles William. H.M.S. Glasgow
Doughty, Albert. H.M.S. Irresistible
Doughty, Arthur. H.M.S. Tartar
Doughty, Herbert. H.M.S. Queen Mary
Doughty, Horace. H.M.S. Donegal
Doughty, John. H.M.S. Hindustan
George, Walter. H.M.S. Agamemnon
Haskett, Bernard. H.M.S. Jason
Haycock, Charles William. H.M.S. Ajax
Hollis, Alfred John. H.M.S. Implacable
Jemmett, Leonard Oakley. H.M.S. Galatea
Mayne, Frederick. H.M.S. Britannia
Parritt, Edward. H.M.S. Defiance
Pauline, Leonard. H.M.S. Hebe
Payne, William. H.M.S. Britannia
Pugh, Charles. H.M.S. Hibernia
Sandleford, James. H.M.S. Mars
Waldron, Jesse. H.M.S. George V.
Waldron, William. H.M.S. Dido

George, William. Royal Marines, H.M.S. Agamemnon
Pugh, Herbert. Royal Marines, H.M.S. Prince George
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This war and its terrible stress forces men to face reality

The vicar of Winkfield noted that some churches were full under the stresses of war – which he expected to last at least another year.

VICAR’S LETTER.

MY DEAR FRIENDS,

Soon after you get the February Magazine Lent, which falls very early this year, will have begun with its call to thoughtfulness and self-examination. And surely this War Year, the solemn Lenten Season will more than ever have its special message for all, and will be a “Call to Worship” to many who have neglected its opportunities in the past.

Our Nonconformist brethren have for some time been organising a “come to Church” campaign, and in most places attendance at public worship has largely increased, because this war with all its terrible stress and anxiety and forces men to face realities and is teaching us to look at the higher issues of life. May we then try to learn the lessons God would teach us by this trial and resolve to make a better use than ever before of this coming Lent; use to the full all the opportunities of public worship and make it a time of specially earnest private prayer for our brave Sailors and Soldiers, our Parish and our Country.

The calls on us during this time war are great, but I hope we shall not allow our usual Lenten self-denial savings purses for the Waifs and Strays to suffer; and that many will apply to the parish clerk or to myself for these purses.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,

H. M. MAYNARD.

OUR ROLL OF HONOUR.- A new list, kindly written out by Mr. Empson, has been made up to date and placed in the Church porch; the list now contains 60 names the following having been recently added:-

Bert King, Reginald Knight, Godfrey Loyd, Vivian Loyd, J. Franklin, Frank Payne, Leonard Tipper, Edward Still, Claud Williams, John Williams.

RED CROSS SOCIETY. – Since the war began the following articles have been forwarded from the Winkfield Branch to the Berkshire Branch at Reading.
140 day shirts, 72 night shirts, 29 bed jackets, 77 pairs of socks, 14 helmets, 16 pairs of operation stockings, 44 belts, 136 bandages, 29 pairs of gloves, 20 pairs of mittens, 5 pairs of bed socks, 9 comforters, 37 cushions.

Up to January 1st the Berkshire Branch sent out 2630 shirts; socks, 2790 pairs; vests, 1688; comforters, 540; night shirts, 700; mittens, 530; bed socks, 650. Of these a large number has been received by the Berkshire Regiment.

A satisfactory feature has been the large number of articles made by the mothers at Mrs. Ferard’s working parties. The value of the articles amounts to £55. To this, kind contributions have been given by Mrs. Asher, Mr. H. P Elliott, Lady Finlay, Mrs. Wilder, Mrs. Hayes Sadler, Mrs. Blakiston, Mrs. Louise Holt, Mrs. Ferard, Miss Thackrah.

It is hoped that further contributions may be received, for the work must not stop. So far as can be seen the stress of war will last another year at least and will seriously affect all of us remaining in England. But we should make every effort not to neglect those who are fighting for the defence of our lives and homes.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, February 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/2)