Teachers over 45 years will not be called up for the present

The County Council continued to try to prevent all its male teachers from being called up to fight.

MILITARY SERVICE

The Board of Education have notified that, by arrangement with the Ministry of National Service, Teachers over 45 years on 1 January, 1918, will not be called up for the present. The age of protection for teachers in Grade II has been raised to 36 years on 1 January, 1918. At the present time the following arrangements are in operation as regards the protection of teachers:

Teachers in Grade III over 25 years of age on 1 January, 1918
Teachers in Grade II over 36 years of age on 1 January, 1918
All teachers over 45 years of age on 1 January, 1918

Since the last meeting, two Headmasters have been called to the colours, one leaves on 8 October; the calling up of another has been postponed till 31 October. The Board of Education have also recommended postponement in the case of the Headmaster of a large Mixed School in East Berks.

Berkshire County Council: Report of School Management Sub-committee, 12 October 1918 (C/CL/C1/1/21)

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The distribution of meat to the public would be jeopardised if more butchers were called up

There were concerns that if butchers were called up no one would be left to prepare meats for sale to the public.

30th September 1918

The Committee nominated the Mayor as the representative of the Food Control Committee on the Committee recently formed to deal with applications for exemption before the Local Tribunal in respect of men engaged in food production and distribution. A deputation from the Butchers’ Committee attended the Committee, and submitted a statement showing that the number of slaughtermen and shopmen employed by the butchers in 1914 was 43; that since that date four butchers’ businesses have been closed down, throwing additional work upon the remaining butchers; and that the present staffs consisted of 14 employees which might, if exemption was not granted in certain cases, be reduced to ten; that the total number of registered customers served by the butchers was 21,474. The deputation stated that if the present staff was further depleted a very serious position was in sight and the distribution of meat to the public would be jeopardised. The Committee instructed the Executive Officer to send a copy of the statement laid before them to the Divisional Ministry of Food and to state that the Committee viewed the position with very considerable apprehension, and requesting that no time should be lost by the Ministry in taking up the matter with the Minister of National Service with a view of a stop being put to any further depletion of the present butchers’ staffs; and further that the Food Control Committee would not accept any responsibility for anything that might happen with regard to the preparation or distribution of meat to the public if there was any further depletion in the butchers’ present staffs.

The Committee approved applications by Mr Keen and Mr Love for permission to sell cooked meats and pies, which complied with the regulations, without coupons.

The Milk Winter Prices Order, 1918, was further considered and the Committee decided that the maximum retail price of milk delivered to purchasers for the months October to April next should be at a flat rate of 3s per gallon, and the Executive Officer was requested to notify the Ministry accordingly.

Newbury Borough Council Food Control Committee minutes (N/AC1/2/9)

Squads of schoolboys to bring in the harvest

Shortages of labour due to the vast numbers of men gone to the war combined with restricted imports to lead to fears for a food crisis.

Public School Boys as Harvesters

The Director-General of National Service has appealed for the help of the elder boys from Public and Secondary Schools as a Reserve of Labour.

There has been good response from the Schools on the part of the Masters and Boys.

Free railway warrants are to be provided for volunteers undertaking work for two consecutive weeks in term time or three consecutive weeks in the holidays.

Boys will be organised in squads. Each squad will be in charge of an assistant master.

Squads will not be asked to do any work under this Scheme on Sundays.

Boys will receive the current rate of wages applicable to the locality, i.e. 3d to 4d. per hour. Boys will only be paid for work done. When not employed through wet weather or for other reasons, they will receive no pay.

Squads for fruit picking are included in the Scheme.

The Rev. R. Holmes, White Waltham Vicarage, Maidenhead, is Secretary for this District and he has asked the Vicar, the Rev. S. M. Winter, to act as Local Correspondent for Wargrave. Applications for the services of such volunteer workers for further particulars should be addressed to him.

Potato Spraying

The Food Protection Committee, through the kindness of the President, have taken steps to obtain Sprayers and the necessary Spraying Material.

The Sprayers will be lent by the Committee to all who require them, and the Liquid will be obtainable at cost price.

Wargrave parish magazine, July 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

One of the sacrifices which the war calls upon us to make

Clergy who had volunteered to become chaplains to the armed forces left vacancies at home, which other clergymen were asked to fill.

As many of our readers know, the Rev. P.L. Tomkins is leaving the Parish at the beginning of June. When Mr. Tomkins volunteered for National Service he had in intention of severing his connection with Bracknell, but the work which the Bishop assigned to him is to help in a Parish in Newbury, where help is greatly needed, and where the Bishop wished him to stay for so long a period that there was no alternative but for Mr. Tomkins to give up his home here and move his possessions to Newbury. It is with very great that we shall part with so old a friend. He has worked here for nearly ten years, and he will be greatly missed. Our prayers and good wishes will follow him and Mrs. Tomkins in the new home to which they are going.

His departure will leave Bracknell less well provided with Clergy than it has been hitherto, but this is one of the sacrifices which the war calls upon us to make.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Magazine, June 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/6)

Wise dealing with the Liquor question

The Bishop asked Berkshire churchgoers to pray for Russia, our ally in the throes of revolution, and for the question of alcohol restrictions at home.

THE BISHOP’S MESSAGE

The following extracts are from the Bishop’s message in the May Diocesan Magazine:

Your prayers are specially asked

For the Russian people and Government and Church

For the Chaplains to the troops, especially those who have gone from this diocese.

For parishes whence clergy have gone on National service, that their spiritual interests may not suffer.

For wise dealing by the Government with the Liquor question…


Earley St Peter parish magazine, May 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

Totally blinded

The County Education Committee continued to find its work affected by the war in many ways, as teachers joined up, prices rose, and they helped people cope with shortages of staple foods.

School Management Sub-committee

SCHOLARSHIPS

Mr F Portas, who has for four years held a Supplementary University Scholarship, has now completed his medical course and passed the final examinations of the Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons. He is now serving in the RAMC. Mr Portas, prior to receiving a Guthrie Scholarship at Westminster Hospital, held a County Scholarship at the Windsor County Boys’ School, where he received his school education.

DOMESTIC ECONOMY

The demand for Sicknursing Classes which have been conducted by Miss Barrett since 1896, has during the last year ceased, chiefly on account of circumstances arising from the war, and the Sub-committee have received the resignation of Miss Barrett.

The Sub-committee desire to record their appreciation of Miss Barrett’s useful work. For twenty years the classes have been held in almost every town and village in the county, and have always been well attended and greatly appreciated.

Higher Education Sub-committee

TEACHERS ON MILITARY SERVICE

Under an arrangement between the Board of Education and the War Office, the following teachers in the lower medical categories have been released from the Army to resume their school work: Mr H May, Mr W Edginton, and Mr B Gibbons.

The Sub-committee record with regret that Mr F W Lupton has been killed in action, and Mr F E Parker has been totally blinded.

SCHOOL SUPPLIES

The Educational Supply Association have given one month’s notice to terminate on 11 May the present schedule of prices on which school materials are supplied; but will submit a revised schedule before that date.

The Contractors for Needlework Supplies have also notified further increases in the prices of some materials, and Messrs Charles & Son have raised their prices for paper goods to 100% above pre-war figures.

NATIONAL SERVICE

The Sub-committee have passed the following resolution:

In view of the fact that the Local Education Authority is of opinion that teachers are engaged in work of national importance, the Local Education authority will be unable to give any guarantee to any teacher called up that his or her place will be kept open.

FOOD ECONOMY CAMPAIGN

The Sub-committee have considered and approved a memorandum of the Education Secretary, referred to them by the War Savings Committee, with regard to the use of the Committee’s Cookery Centres for making known the best way of utilising as foods such substitutes for wheat as are available locally.

Reports of School Management Sub-committee and Higher Education Sub-committee to Berkshire Education Committee, 28 April 1917 (C/CL/C1/1/20)

‘Not many “offer forms” were filled up’ for National Service Scheme

Cranbourne people were prepared to grow food and save waste paper, but were less keen to offer their services.

A Waste Paper Depot has been arranged at the Sunday School. Waste Paper is received every Wednesday afternoon between 2 p.m. and 5.30 p.m.

The Seed Potatoes have arrived and will be given out on Wednesday, April 25th, between 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. We are grateful to Mr. Belcher for the use of his barn.

A canvass of the Parish in connection with the National Service Scheme has been made, but not many “offer forms” were filled up.

Cranbourne section of Winkfield District Magazine, May 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/5)

We shall all share in the blessings of Victory as we should all share in the Miseries of Defeat

A rousing call to arms, or rather to joining in the National Service Scheme to help out on the home front.

Twelve good Reasons

1. BECAUSE the Greatest War the World has ever seen is nearing its climax, when we and our Allies must either conquer or be conquered.

2. BECAUSE Victory will mean the preservation of our homes, our lives, our liberties and all we hold dear, while Defeat will mean the loss of all these things and triumph of a Despotic Military System which seeks to destroy the British Empire and impose itself on the whole world.

3. BECAUSE having passed laws to compel men of certain ages to fight it is the bounded duty not of one man or one set of men, but every man to see that the Army and Navy are provide with everything they need to secure Victory, and to help to that end as far as possible.

4. BECAUSE our food supplies from abroad being threatened or reduced, and many agriculturists at home having been called up, men are urgently required to maintain and if possible to increase, our home supplies.

5. BECAUSE we cannot do these things unless all the manpower of the country is available and is properly organized, for which purpose the National Service Department has been formed.

6. BECAUSE our enemies the Germans are already organizing every man, woman and child for a similar purpose, but by the much less desirable method of Industrial Compulsion, which we are especially anxious to avoid.

7. BECAUSE if everyone helps who can , the war will be shortened, thereby saving at least six million pounds per day in money, and what is of infinite greater importance the lives, limbs and health of human beings, including in many cases our own relatives and friends.

8. BECAUSE every right-minded and patriotic man desires to help, but many do not know how or where to begin. Like an untrained and undisciplined Army, we are helpless without organization.

9. BECAUSE the National Service Department provides this organization, and when it has the names and qualifications of every one between the ages of 18 and 61, it will be able to supply man power where it is most needed, and to prevent the waste of it by putting “round men into round holes and square men into square holes” the right man in the right place.

10. BECAUSE certain occupations are essential while others are non-essential, and at any cost to ourselves or our comfort, the former should not want for a moment for labour which can be supplied by those engaged in the latter, or by those who are not engaged in either.

11. BECAUSE we shall all share in the blessings of Victory as we should all share in the Miseries of Defeat and it is therefore “up to” everyone of us to offer our services, whether they are accepted or not. To take part in civil occupations of National Importance involves little sacrifice when compared with that which we call upon our Soldiers and Sailors to make.

12. BECAUSE every man who enrols will be able, with a clear conscience, to reflect that in the hour of the Nation’s peril, he offered “to do his bit” by placing himself at the service of his country.

Note. If you agree that the above reasons are good reasons why all should enrol, go to the nearest Post Office, National Service Office or Employment Exchange and get a free form of application , fill it up (whether you are engaged already in work of National Importance or not) and post it (unstamped) to the Director General of National Service.

Reading St Mark section of Reading St Mary parish magazine, April 1917 (D/P98/28A/15)

“Confident that he would return safely, but God saw otherwise”

Two Newbury clergymen volunteered to serve as army chaplains, while soldiers from the town were reported killed. Another man returned disabled.

The Director General of National Service has entrusted the Archbishops and Bishops with the task of finding out what the clergy can undertake in this direction, and the Rural Dean of Newbury a short time ago held a meeting of clergy to discuss it.

The Rev. H C Roberts has felt it to be his duty to volunteer for a Military Chaplaincy, and his name has been sent up to the Chaplain General of the forces. We congratulate Mr Roberts upon his patriotic action, though we shall very much miss him in the parish if he is accepted; and we hope it may be possible for him to return to Newbury when the war is over. It will interest the parishioners to hear that the name of the Rev. A H D Newbold has also been sent up by his Rural Dean for a Military Chaplaincy. When Mr Roberts leaves us, there may have to be some alteration in the services of the church.

We offer our sincere sympathy to Mrs Albert Nailor on the death of her husband in action, and to the wife and father and mother of Richard Smith, also killed in action. He is another of our old choir boys who has laid down his life for his country. He had been home on leave, and had returned to the front full of his usual good spirits, quite confident that he would return safely, but God saw otherwise. We are glad to have Albert Hill back in Newbury with his honourable loss, and we hope that, when he is fitted out, he will be able to return to his former occupation.

Let us redouble our prayers on behalf of our nation’s cause, and for all those who are fighting for her by sea or land or air. This is our best war service.

Newbury St Nicholas parish magazine, April 1917 (D/P89/28A/13)

An increasing number of discharged soldiers are suffering from tuberculosis

The County Council’s Public Health and Housing Committee had to face the problem of men sent home as they had been diagnosed with TB – a very infectious, often fatal illness.

Accommodation at Peppard

The question of providing additional accommodation at Peppard has been raised in view of the increasing number of discharged soldiers suffering from tuberculosis requiring treatment, and a prelimnary inquiry at Peppard, in conjunction with representatives of the Bucks County Council has been suggested.

Military and National Service

The Committee have considered the effect of the new Military Service Act (which provides for the re-examination by the Military Authorities of men discharged from the Army) and of the National Service Scheme, as regards men who have recently suffered from tuberculosis. There appears to be some danger of such men being taken into the Army or sent to unsuitable work, and a communication has been sent to the Local Government Board expressing the hope that the arrangement for not calling up men notified as tuberculous and men discharged from the Army on account of tuberculosis for further military service for a period of three years, would be confirmed – and extended with modifications to National Service.

Report of Public Health and Housing Committee, 14 April 1917 (C/CL/C1/1/20)

“Much abuse of the manpower of the nation”

The Dodeka Club discussed government inefficiency in putting people’s skills to the best use.

The 283rd meeting of the Dodeka was held at Baynes’ on April 13th 1917.

Much interest was shown in the early part of the evening in Morris’s recent experiences with burglars, the full account of which was heard by many for the first time.

After refreshments the host called on Morris for the paper.

Morris, after explaining that he had been unable to prepare a paper suggested as material for discussion, the two topics had been prominently before the public during recent weeks, namely “Man Power” and “National Service”. The secretary, after some thought, concluded that the best title for Morris’s remarks would be (with apologies to Dickens), “The Art of Circumlocution, or How not to do it”.

Many instances were given of Navy business methods. Orders being sent for confirmation from Reading to Winchester, Winchester to Salisbury, Salisbury to the War Office, and being received back via the same route, thus wasting much valuable time. Instances were given of skilled mechanics being put to road making and men off the land being put to the work of mechanics, such as painting, etc. it was concluded that there was much abuse of the manpower of the nation, and that the War Office had no direct methods of dealing with any business.

Dodeka Book Club minutes (D/EX2160/1/3)

‘I may have to “join up” at any time now’

The curate at Dedworth had applied for service as an army chaplain.

All Saints’, Dedworth

The Rector warned you last month that owing to the call the Country is making upon able-bodied men for National Service, a member of this staff might be withdrawn from Parish work which would mean the cutting down of the number of Services held in the Parish.

Since that date I have been recommended by the Bishop of the Diocese to the Chaplain General as an Army Chaplain, and have also had some correspondence with the latter. It is therefore possible that I may have to “join up” at any time now, or on the other hand nothing may come of these negotiations.

But if the former be the case we hope to make arrangements for at least an early Celebration of the Holy Communion every Sunday and a sung Evensong at All Saints. The Sung Eucharist would have to be given up for the time being. Should these changes come to pass I do most earnestly hope that you will make real use of the opportunities for worship offered you, and do your utmost to “keep things going” until, please God, I return.

Clewer parish magazine (D/P39/28A/9)

A golden gleam of hope

The controversial question of working on Sundays was challenged due to war conditions.

THE VICAR’S LETTER

My dear friends

Holy Week and April begin together, the 1st of April is Palm Sunday and the 8th is Easter Day. Never were the lessons of the season ore needed than in this time of stress and trouble, through which however there runs ever widening the golden gleam of hope…

We have recently had an urgent call to enrol ourselves for National Service, and we hope that all, men and women, will do their best to answer that call.

The Archbishop of Canterbury has issued a notice that, during the present stress, agricultural and horticultural work may, if it is considered necessary, be undertaken on Sundays. This does not mean that the Sunday Services are to be neglected; our own Bishop writes as follows on the subject in the Diocesan magazine:

“If the Minister of Agriculture makes a serious demand for Sunday labour in the next few weeks for the sake of the food supply, I agree with the Archbishop of Canterbury that the Church ought not to object, but to do the utmost to make spiritual provision for the workers in unusual ways outside the hours of work. The Church has generally approved of such Sunday labour as is necessary to prepare and save the crops.”

We believe that most Church people are doing their best to reverence the day, while working part of it, but we fear that, throughout the country, many, who hardly ever enter a place of worship, are making the Archbishop’s utterance an excuse for throwing off the restraint which they have been constrained to show out of respect to general custom…

Your friend and vicar
W W Fowler

Earley St Peter parish magazine, April 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

“It is ours now to put courage into fainting men”

Members of Maidenhead Congregational Church were challenged to join the National Service Scheme, but not to neglect their faith.

“God bless our native land,
May Heaven’s protecting hand
Still guard her shore;
May peace her sway extend,
Foe be transformed to friend,
And Britain’s power depend
On wars no more.”

NATIONAL SERVICE.

The days are upon us when we must prove to the utmost what manner of people we are. In fighting force, in food growing, in economy, in patience, in faith, in prayer, we are called upon to put forth our strength. There are not many more who can be summoned to the Army ranks, but there are some still who can serve in other ways. The Director of National Service is calling for volunteers, asking us

“to offer our services to our country, perhaps only for a few months, until Victory is secured. We are not called upon to fight, but to set free men who can fight, and to help them to the end of our powers. It may – and in most cases will – amount to no more than going on with our own usual work, working with all our might and avoiding all waste and extravagance. It may be that in cases of urgent necessity we are asked to work at some place away from our own homes- a trifling disadvantage, a tiny sacrifice compared with that of the soldier and sailor.”

No doubt many of us will give heed to this call, and consider whether we cannot serve the National cause in some new way. But we can all increase the National efficiency by putting fresh reality into our Christian and Church life. The pressure of things makes attendance at week-night meetings, and even at Sunday Services, less possible for some. But it ought not to follow that our Church vitality and working force is less.

We can be more earnest and intense, making the utmost of our lessened opportunities. We can test more fully the efficacy of prayer. We shall assuredly not help the country by letting the fire of our religion become dim, while we are attending to material things. Religion is no waste of time. It is ours now to put courage into fainting men, to console the sorrowing, to teach men to fix their hearts upon God. If ever the Ministry of the Church were of value, it is now, when tired souls are fainting; it is ours to turn the thoughts of men to Him who rules over all lands and seas, and who can make even sorrow a ministering angel of His love.

Maidenhead Congregational Church magazine, April 1917 (D/N33/12/1/5)

Who are willing to offer themselves?

Clergy were expected to answer the call of the new National Service Scheme as well as laymen.

National Service.

We all know that the Country is calling upon able-bodied persons both men and women from the age of 18 to 61, to volunteer for National Service. It is a call addressed to the Clergy as well as the Laity. Our Bishop is making enquiries of the Clergy in his Diocese to ascertain who are willing to offer themselves, either for spiritual or secular work. The decision rests with him as to which and how many of the Clergy, who volunteer, can be spared from the Diocese. If any member of our staff of Clergy is thus withdrawn from Parish work, we must be prepared to reduce some of the Services and make the best use of our diminished opportunities. Perhaps, as things are, we have too many Services in the various Districts, and a little concentration would not be a bad thing for us. It is sometimes found to be the case that those who have fewer facilities for Public Worship make a better use of them than those who have too many. If the Bishop therefore counsels a temporary reduction in the staff of Clergy in this Parish, we must readily submit to it.

The War Shrines.

All the money needed for the War Shrines in Clewer Village and Clewer New Town has now been subscribed. Any money subsequently sent will be given to the permanent Memorial which we hope to have erected in the Church when the War is over.

Clewer St Andrew parish magazine, March 1917 (D/P39/28A/9)