All must help in war time, and none are too young

The people of Bracknell were sending photographs of home to loved ones at the front, while those at Cranbourne were urged to save money by giving children home made jam instead of treacle.

BRACKNELL

SNAPSHOTS

The Y.M.C.A. have a scheme on hand to cheer our gallant Soldiers and Sailors on active service. It is not money they ask for, only snapshots for our men, pictures of their little children, dear friends and relations. Helpers are wanted and wanted at once, so anyone with a camera who is willing to assist should at once communicate with Mrs. Vlasto, Binfield Park, who is Secretary for this district.

Many brave men have gone from this neighbourhood and their relations and friends are invited to write to Mrs. Vlasto, who will then arrange with as little delay as possible for photographs to be taken and forwarded. We know what a joy these pictures of home will be to our men.

CRANBOURNE

The voluntary enumerators for Cranbourne in connection with the making of the National Register were Mr. L. Creasy, Mr. R. Martin, Mr. Maxwell Williams.

We print below the rest of Mrs. Smith’s letter.

As for jam, the little ones need it. Make what you can at home. It is a lot of bother, and is cheaper, but good. Mrs. Dash will lend her preserving pan all along the road, now that it is war time. If you eat the jam quick as it is made, you may skimp the sugar. Boil the fruit till tender. Then add the sugar, and boil short and sharp. If it boils till it begins to brown, that shows it is wasting away.

Treacle pleases most children, but that gain comes from foreign parts, I fancy. Make the children save their half-pence, too. This sounds rather strict, but once taught to save, they are proud of it, and they learn to say “no” to temptation, which is half the battle of life. All must help in war time, and none are too young. Save the odds and ends, pieces of paper and string, jam glasses, old tins, pins, corks. It is true I am afraid that we are a wasteful nation, so let us try and learn our lesson during what will be for ever known as “the great war.”

I am forgetting the tea. Our tea is now so dear, and may be much dearer. When you only want one cup, or a cup for yourself and a friend, at odd times, use a penny strainer. Stand it over the cup, with a pinch of tea, and pour the water very slowly through it. It will taste alright and save half the tea. Cold tea with no milk, very weak, and if you can manage it, a squeeze of lemon, makes a refreshing drink. One of Queen Victoria’s doctors told me of this, to use in sickness or health. You could make this from the tea leaves, and still have them to sweep with. Now I must conclude, from your sincere friend and well-wisher.

MRS. SMITH.

WINKFIELD

Our Choir men have again unselfishly foregone their excursion this year in order that the burden on Church expenses may be lessened and enable more offertories to be given to War funds, and also that each of their brother members at the Front might receive a special present and token of remembrance.


Winkfield District Magazine, September 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/9)