“There ought never to be a war, with these modern inventions for destroying life”

Two of Ralph Glyn’s friends wrote to him with their thoughts on the war. Hereward Wake was the owner of Courteenhall near Northampton; it has not been possible to identify Evan. Brocket Hall belonged to the Cain family (later Lords Brocket) but was let to Lord Mount Stephen.

Brocket Hall
Hatfield
Sept 2nd 1915
Dearest Ralph

I see this morning there was another fight on 27th, which means more [illegible], alas! What a nightmare this war. There ought never to be a war, with these modern inventions for destroying life. It makes me sick – we will never get reconciled to it…

I am so thankful to hear you are all right. The Dardanelles must be a truly awful business, & what bad luck those two coups didn’t come off.

Still it is something that the Turk fights like a gentleman, for certainly the Bosche doesn’t. What a loathsome lot they are…

Yours ever
Evan

Courteenhall
Northampton
2 Sept. 15

My dear Ralph

I am glad to get your letter of 10th Aug today. More power to you – good luck. The British people have got quite used to long casualty lists and no success anywhere and they are making so much money out of the war that few care how long it lasts. There is not a suspicion that we might get beaten in the end, which may be correct, no doubt, but it seems to me that we shall never go into the business heart & soul till we are frightened.

You were very right about the war lasting a long time, but I still think the decisive point is in France & Belgium. The enclosed cutting [no longer with it] expresses my views pretty well as regards the Dardanelles, which is now generally admitted to have been a bad mistake. But I suppose we have to see it through now as you say. Fortunately for us, the Germans went for the Russians this summer. I hope the weather will before long check their advance in that direction. Now of course we have got the hell of a lot of troops in France & every month we have more. A little ammunition is trickling out too, so the Bosche will get a warm time if & when he marches our way to take the offensive. German confidence & initiative seems inexhaustible but I bet they’d be ready to bargain with what they’ve got for peace by Christmas.

Well, take care of yourself. The Turk will soon run out of ammunition. Any Italians your way?

Yrs
Hereward

I am just going up for my Board & expect to be passed fit. Thank heaven I hope soon to be out again & doing my bit.

Algy Harris is very fit & cheerful & very active on his 1 leg. He goes to stay with Maysie this week.

Letters to Ralph Glyn (D/EGL/C31/17-18)

Advertisements

Cranbourne’s working party is highly spoken of

Women in Cranbourne joined the national effort to make clothing for soldiers and refugees. Gian, Lady Mount Stephen (1864-1933), a lady in waiting to the Queen, was a relative of the Glyns who was married to a wealthy Canadian peer. She grew up in Uffington, and was the daughter of a Naval officer.

SEWING MEETING.

The working party, in aid of Queen Mary’s Needlework Guild, has now closed for the summer months. It was started last August under the direction of Mrs. Maxwell Williams. She and Miss Maxwell Williams cut out all the garments- no slight task. The cost of the materials was £55 and was given by the Lady Mountstephen, to whom our thanks are given for affording us the opportunity of supplying some of the needs due to the war. About 1100 articles have been forwarded to the Guild Headquarters, which are at St. James’ Palace. There they are dealt with by a large Committee of ladies, who forward the various garments and other work to our soldiers at the front, our hospitals in England, the Maternity homes for the wives of Soldiers, and the needy Belgians.

Mrs. Maxwell Williams will be very pleased to continue meeting in the early Autumn, if it is still needed, and thanks all the members who have worked so hard and attended so regularly. It is gratifying to hear that the work has been much appreciated at the Headquarters of the Guild and highly spoken of.

Cranbourne section of Winkfield District Magazine, May 1916 (D/P151/28A/7/5)