These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War

A final list of the Wargrave men who served in the war. NB: where this symbol † appears in the list, an entry for this soldier exists in the corresponding supplement to follow.

ROLL OF HONOUR.

These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War.

Additions and Corrections for this Roll should be sent to the Vicar as soon as possible.

Adby, L.
Adby, C.
Adby, W.
Adby, O.
Alderton, F. J.
Allen, C. W.
Allum, H.
Amos, G.
Andrew, H.
Arnold, A. E.
Arnold, W.
Attlesey, H. F.
(more…)

Trench fever and training

Mixed news for Winkfield families.

We are very glad to be able to report that the parents of Pte. Cecil Brant have had their anxiety lessened by the news that he is a prisoner of war in Germany; they have also now had a card from him saying that he is well, and unwounded.

We congratulate Captain Forster Maynard on his promotion to Major R.A.F.

Sergeant Leonard Tipper has been ill with trench fever but is now convalescent, and about to begin his training in England for commission.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, September 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/8)

The great cause for which we are fighting – the cause of liberty, justice, peace and the fellowship of nations

Churches in the Bracknell area joined in the National Day of Intercession.

Ascot

Sunday, January 6th (The Epiphany) has been appointed as a day of Special Prayer for the War and the alms at all services will be for the Red Cross Fund.


Bracknell

‘THE WAR.—In accordance with the King’s Proclamation the first Sunday in the New Year, January 6th,the Feast of the Epiphany, will be observed as a special day of Prayer and Thanksgiving in Bracknell. The services in the Church will be held at the usual hours, but special forms of prayer will be used, and every one who desires to seek the help of God in these anxious times should make a point of being present. The collections will be given to the Red Cross Society.

Cranbourne

THE DAY OF NATIONAL PRAYER.
As we all know, the 1st Sunday in the New Year has been appointed as a “Day for Intercession on behalf of the Nation and Empire in this Time of War.” There will be celebrations of the Holy Communion as 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. Special forms of Prayer and Thanksgiving have been issued under the authority of the Archbishops of Canterbury and York and will be used at our services. January 6th is the Feast of the Epiphany. The idea of the Epiphany is the manifestation of God among all nations nations, and our Bishop has pointed out “how deeply we stand in need of such a manifestation to day, and how “the great cause for which we are fighting – the cause of liberty, justice, peace and the fellowship of nations – would truly, if it were realised, be a manifestation of God, and a preperation for the Kingdom of Christ, for which our most earnest and constant prayers are needed.

It is to be hoped that, whatever the weather is, none of us will be absent from the services on January 6th, but that we shall, as a Parish kneel before the Throne of Grace and offer up our petitions to Him who judges the peoples of the world, and is our only refuge and strength, and a very present help in time of trouble.

Winkfield

VICAR’s LETTER.

My Dear Friends,

Once again the New Year will find us in the midst of the horrors of war, and in our King’s words, “this world wide struggle for the triumph of right and liberty is entering on its last and most difficult phase when we shall need our courage fortified to face the sacrifices we may yet hace to make before our work is done.”

Very justly does the King call upon all his people to make the first Sunday of the New Year a Day of special Prayer and Thanksgiving, a day of National Intercession to Gon on Behalf of our Country, for the great casuse of rightousness entrusted to us, and for the men (so many of them near and dear to us in Winkfield) who are fighting for it on sea and land.

We all long for a victorious Peace, but can we expect that almighty God will, as a matter of course, give it us, if we do not think it worth while to ask Him for it by humble and united Public Prayer; for until we, as a whole Nation, realise our need od something more that material force, we do not deserve to win.

It is then a real patriotic duty for every man and woman to attend their Parish Church on January 6th and take their part in this National wave of Intercession. Our Sailors and Soldiers have a right to expect our prayers; and the help and co-operation of those who seldom or never go to Church or Chapel is specially asked on this great and solemn occasion.

I can only solemnly repeat what I wrote last year that I should not like to have on my own conscience the responsibility which that man or woman takes who could help their Country by joining in this movement, and yet is too careless and indifferent to do so.

If you belevie in God, and have any love for your Country, come and help.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,

H.M. Maynard

The Services on January 6th will be:

8 a.m., Holy Communion.
11 a.m. Service and Holy Communion.
6.30 p.m. Special Intercession Service (copies of which will be provided.)

Bracknell, February

The Day of Prayer and Thanksgiving in connection with the War on January 6th was fairly well kept in Bracknell. The congregations were larger than usual in the morning and evening, and in the afternoon a considerably number of people attended the special service. The weather was bad and hindered some who would have wished to be present, but it was a little disappointing not to have had quite crowded congregations on such a day.

Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, January 1918 (D/P 151/281/10)

“His machine nose dived to what seemed certain death”

There were varying fortunes for the men of Winkfield.

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.

Much sympathy is felt for the family of Private Charles Mitchell, who we much regret to record was killed in action on October 11th. He was only 19, and had been at the front but a few weeks. A memorial service will be held on Sunday, November 11th, at 6.30 at the Parish Church , when we have no doubt that many will show their sympathy by attending.

Stoker Karl Brant has been very ill with pneumonia but is now convalescent and home on leave.

Private Fred Fancourt has been wounded in the face; he is in Hospital in France and is doing well.

Flight Commander Foster Maynard met with an aeroplane accident which nearly cost him his life. It is reported that when flying, through some mishap, his machine nose dived to what seemed certain death, when it was held up by some branches and he sustained many cuts about the head and a badly broken arm, but is now doing well in hospital.

Private Albert Carter is ill with trench fever, he is in hospital in England and we hope progressing favourably.

We are glad to learn that Private John Carter who had a very long and serious illness, is now convalescent, also Private George Streamer is now almost recovered and able to take up light duty in Ireland.

Private William Burt has been invalided out of the Amy, the chronic nephritis from which he is suffering being brought on by the exposure and hardships of the trenches. He is much better now and will we trust in time get quite strong again.

We congratulate Sergeant Henry Oatway on his promotion to Sergeant-Major in the Engineers.

CHRISTMAS PRESENTS TO OUR MEN.

We have always remembered the Sailors and Soldiers from our Parish at Christmas, and sent them small Christmas gifts which they have greatly appreciated. Mrs. Maynard raised the fund for doing this last Christmas and the Christmas before by means of a rummage sale, but this cannot be managed this year and so we must fall back on the subscriptions as in 1914, but I am sure that we shall feel it a privilege to do our share in bringing some Christmas cheer to the men to whom we owe so much. About £15 will be required.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/11)

“Our purpose that we may be worthy of you and help to make England ‘God’s own Country’ when you come home”

Winkfield remembered its soldiers at Easter.

MY DEAR FRIENDS,

In writing briefly to wish you all a happy Easter, there is I feel sure but little need to ask you not to forget our Soldiers and Sailors in prayer on Easter Day. I am sending men from our parish an Easter card with the assurance that we at the old Church at home shall be praying for them at our Easter Communion, and with the following message:

“We send you this card to remind you of the Easter flowers at Home, of our love and prayers for you in your great sacrifice for us, of our purpose that we may be worthy of you and help to make England ‘God’s own Country’ when you come home. Will you join with us on Easter Day in thanking God that He sent His Son to suffer and die that He might open the Gate of Life to all who trust in His Great Sacrifice for them, and that He lives to be our ever present Friend.”

The celebration of the Holy Communion on Easter Day will be at 6, 8.15, and midday at the parish Church, and at 7 at S. Mary the Less, and the names of our men at the Front will be mentioned at all these Services.
Your sincere Friend and Vicar,
H. M. MAYNARD

With sorrow we have to record this month another addition to our Roll of Honour, for Private Edward Holloway of the 6th Royal Berks Regiment died of wounds received in action on February 23rd. A memorial service was held at S. Mary the Less on March 4th, when there was a large congregation, full of sympathy for his young widow and his bereaved parents who have three other sons now at the Front.

Private Edward Fancourt has joined the Royal Marine Light Infantry, and Private Cecil Brant the Cyclist Corps of the 11th Berks Yeomanry.

Private Henry Clayton, who recently joined the 2nd Hants Regiment, has now gone out to the Front.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, April 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/4)

“It is nice to think that our friends at home are always thinking of us out here”

There was sad news for some Winkfield families.

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING

It is with very great regret that we have to record the death in action of Lance Corporal Edward Thurmer, Royal Berks Regt. Deep sympathy is felt for his parents who have now lost two sons in this war. A memorial service was held on January 14th.

L.M. Donald Thurmer, R.N. Air Service, has had an accident and has been for some time in hospital at Mudros, but we are glad to hear that he is now nearly recovered.

Pte. William Burt who has been in hospital in France suffering from nephritis and “trench feet” has, we are glad to say, recovered sufficiently to be brought to England and is now in hospital in Aldershot.

Pte. Fred Johnson has just joined the 3rd Battalion of the Royal Berks. Regt.

Mrs. Maynard has received many letters of thanks for their Christmas presents from our men. All seemed pleased with them, and especially appreciate the fact that they were not forgotten at Christmas, and the tenor of most of their letters is summed up in this quotation from one of them, –

“It is nice to think that our friends at home are always thinking of us out here.”

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, February 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/2)

Thankofferings from the Christmas dinner table

Winkfield people continued to support our allies in beleagured Belgium, and more women were called to help making clothes and bandages for the wounded.

THE BELGIAN RELIEF FUND.

The envelopes for thankofferings from the Christmas dinner table, which were distributed throughout the parish, have been opened and the contents counted by the Vicar and Churchwarden. Ninety-two envelopes were returned and the total amounted to £12 2s. 5d., which was forwarded to the National Committee for Relief in Belgium.

Mrs. Maynard would be glad to receive the names of any from the Church end of the parish who would be willing to work for the Red Cross, either at home, if materials were provided, or at a Working Party at the Vicarage once a week.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, February 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/2)

Dangerously ill

Some Winkfield soldiers were ill, while other men from the parish had distinguished themselves.

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.

We regret to hear that Pte. William Burt is ill in hospital in France, and wish him a speedy recovery.

Pte. Bernard Grantham has been very dangerously ill with pneumonia; we rejoice to hear that he is now much better, and we hope out of danger.

We heartily congratulate Lieut. Cecil Ferard on the honour of being mentioned in despatches, and Flight-Lieut. F.H.M. Maynard on his promotion to Flight Commander, R.N.

Winkfield section of Winkfield district magazine, January 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/1)

Back in the trenches again

More and more Winkfield men had headed to the Front.

Gunner Daniel Taylor has been wounded in the foot, and Pte. Edward Holloway in the shoulder; both are doing well.

We regret to learn that Pte. A.E. Burt, who was convalescent from a serious illness, has had a relapse, and is again in hospital. We sincerely hope that his relatives will soon have better news of him.

Pte. Edward Still having served his time in the Coldstream Guards, has rejoined the Colours and is now with the 14th Devons at the Front.

Pte. George Holloway has also just gone to the front.

Pte. Cecil Jenden recently wrote to the vicar that he has quite recovered from his wound, and is now back in the trenches again.

We were very glad to see Pte. George Benstead again in his place in the Choir for two Sundays; though lame from his wound he is able to get about, and we trust will soon be completely recovered.

We congratulate Lance-Corporal Edward Thurmer and Lance Corporal Brant on gaining their stripe.

The following men from our Parish have just joined His Majesty’s Forces:-

Pte. Albert Brown, A.S.C. Mechanical Transport.
Pte. George Clayton, 3rd Royal Berks.
Pte. A. E. Gardner, 4th Northants.
Pte. George Franklin, 10th Sussex Regt.
Pte. William Harwood, 3rd Royal Berks.
Pte. James Summer, R.F.A.

We hope this Christmas to be able again to send small Christmas presents to the men from our parish now serving, but as their numbers this year are so great we shall need more generous help than ever to enable us to send even a very small token of remembrance to each. Mrs. Maynard is arranging to have a small rummage sale in the Parish Room at the end of November to help raise some of the necessary funds, and she would welcome any articles for this sale.

She would also be glad to receive as soon as possible from their relatives the full addresses of any men serving in Mesopotamia or Egypt, for their gifts ought to be dispatched by the middle of November.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1916 (D/P151/28A/11)

“Gratitude for the share which the Sailors and Soldiers from the Parish are taking in the defence of our Country and our homes”

Winkfield Church was carefully keeping in touch with its men on active service.

C.E.M.S.

Final arrangements were made for the sending to all our men on Service an Easter Card and Booklet with the following words of greeting:

Winkfield, April 16th.

“Dear Brother,

In sending you the enclosed booklet and Easter card of greeting the Church of England Men’s Society in Winkfield wish to express their feeling of gratitude for the share which the Sailors and Soldiers from the Parish are taking in the defence of our Country and our homes. Once again the eyes of all Christians are turned, at this season, to view the two sublime events on which the salvation of the world depends, the Death and Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ; and we cannot send you a better greeting than to wish for you and for ourselves that we may accept the former as the one thing of real importance to us, and may see in the latter the guarantee of a new and better life after death if we accept His service and trust His promise.”

Yours very truly,

H.M. Maynard, President
F.L. Wilder, Secretary

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.

The following have lately joined His Majesty’s Forces: William Burt, Royal Berks. Regt.; Wilfred Church, Army Service Corps; Fred Fancourt, Grenadier Guards; Tom Simmonds, Royal Berks Regiment.

Pte. George Faithful was wounded rather badly in the head and face and has been some time in hospital but is now nearly convalescent and is expected home shortly.

Pts. George Thurmer had an accident whilst at the Front, but we are glad to learn that he is doing well.

Sergeant James Thurmer is reported as still seriously ill; his wounds were very severe and much anxiety is felt by his relatives who have our sincere sympathy.

We were glad to welcome Signaller Fred Holmes back on leave for a few days, and it was delightful to see him again in his place in the choir on the Sunday before Easter.

Welcome to 2nd Lieut. R. Hayes-Sadler whose wound is now nearly healed and who is having a few weeks convalescent at home.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District magazine, May 1916 (D/P151/28A/5)

Temporary shades not effective

It proved impossible to get Winkfield church dark enough to comply with new laws aimed at preventing air raids.

THE VICAR’S LETTER.

MY DEAR FRIENDS.

I want all to clearly understand why it is that we are unable for a few weeks to have Sunday Evening Service in the Parish Church. The new lighting regulations are the cause, but if shades on the lamps had been sufficient to meet the requirements of the authorities there would have been no need to discontinue the Evening Services. To make sure I asked the Sergeant of Police to attend Church on Sunday, January 9th, when it would be lighted up. He kindly came, and after the Service we tried some temporary shades which Mr. George Brown was good enough to bring, but as, in spite of these, the light was still reflected through the unstained windows, the Sergeant reported that only curtains over the windows on the north side and over the vestry and belfry windows could meet the case.

I therefore consulted the Churchwardens and we came to the conclusion that we were not justified in going to the considerable expense of putting up curtains when the Church at Winkfield Row could be darkened at a trifling cost; especially since it was only a question of about six weeks, and by the second Sunday in March we should be able to resume evening service in the Parish Church. Moreover I felt that it might be well to try the experiment of seven Sunday evening services at the other end of the parish, as if it were shown that these were valued, it might be possible another winter to have occasional services there, and judging from the good congregations that have assembled, it seems that the experiment was justified.

You will find in this magazine a leaflet addressed to the women of our neighbourhood by the District War Agricultural Committee. I hope it may meet with some real response, and I should be glad if I can be of any help in explaining the matter or on forwarding the names of any who would like to be put on the register.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,

H. M. MAYNARD.

PARISH NOTES

The following have recently joined His Majesty’s Forces:-

Alfred Brant, Queen’s Own Ox. Hussars.
John Carter, Royal Engineers.
Albert Higgs, King’s Royal Rifles.
Fred Lunn, 5th Rifle Brigade.

Pte. George Chaney has recently been in hospital at the Front, but we are glad to hear that he is now in a Convalescent camp and likely to be completely restored to health.

THE CHRISTMAS PRESENTS TO OUR MEN.- These accounts have been kindly audited by Mr. A. Elliot. They show:

Total Receipts … £24 5 11
Expenditure … 19 5 5½

Mrs. Maynard has handed the balance of £5 0s. 5½d. to Mrs. Ferard for Red Cross work in the parish.

Winkfield section of the Winkfield District Magazine, February 1916 D/P151/28A/8/2

“God and Right” is the fighting motto of our sailors and soldiers

The vicar of Winkfield had some stirring words for parishioners, who had sent Christmas gifts to men at the front.

THE VICAR’S LETTER.

MY DEAR FRIENDS.

You will have already received my letter about the Day of National Intercession on January 2nd, and I sincerely hope that there will be very few this year who will have the reproach of neglecting to respond to this piece of duty to their country, the joining and offering of humble homage to Almighty God in humble recognition of our National reliance upon His overruling Hand.

We long for peace and pray it may come this year, but we believe with our whole souls that we are fighting for God and Right, and it is this that has nerved so many thousands to answer their country’s call as clear call from God, and to offer their young lives willingly, cheerfully and gladly until a just and lasting peace can be secured.
And this brings the thought, has my response to the call of God and His Church to serve in His Army against all the forces of evil, been like that? Ought not our Christian soldiering to be far more real and earnest? If “God and Right” be the fighting motto of our sailors and soldiers, shall it not also be a New Year’s motto for all of us who are pledged to serve in the Army of God. May it be yours and mine in this New Year.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,

H. M. MAYNARD.

PARISH NOTES

The Christmas presents to our men were sent off in good time and already Mrs. Maynard has received several grateful letters with warm expressions of thanks to all kind friends in Winkfield who helped, and this proof that they were not forgotten be those at home is what seems to have been especially appreciated by the men.

Seventy-seven parcels were sent, practically all of which contained some articles of warm clothing, besides cigarettes, pipes, tobacco, chocolate, biscuits, &c., and a pocket testament and tiny prayer book.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Monthly Magazine, January 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/1)

“We will keep the Home fires burning and the Church bells ringing till our lads come home”

The vicar of Winkfield drew parishioners’ attention to the spiritual needs of men at the front.

THE VICAR’S LETTER

MY DEAR FRIENDS,

I think most of us know that we are sending to all the men from our parish now serving in the Army or Navy, Christmas greetings accompanied by a present, to let them know that whilst they are spending Christmas far away they are not forgotten by those at home. Each man will receive with is present a Christmas card with the words “We will keep the Home fires burning and the Church bells ringing till our lads come home,” and also the message, which I ask you to specially note “We are praying for you at our Christmas Communion.” Those of us who have relations at the front will hardly need to be invited to come to Church on Christmas Day and there, especially in Holy Communion, the Lord’s own Service, commend their dear ones to His keeping; but I trust there will be but few in the parish who will not make a point of attending Divine Service on such a solemn and unique Christmas as this will be, to remember in earnest prayer those who cannot be with us in the home circle.

I want to draw the attention of those who have relatives serving to the article on “The Little Calendar.” One of these calendars, together with a pocket Testament and Prayer Book will be sent in each Christmas parcel to our men, and I should be glad to supply any who would like one of these calendars in order to read the same passage daily and use the same prayer as a bond between themselves and their absent loved ones.

In closing let me commend to your thoughtful consideration the message from the Archbishops urging us to make the first Sunday in the New Year a special day of Intercession in connection with the War. Notices of Services will be issued later.
Your sincere Friend and Vicar,
H.M. MAYNARD

* * *

THE LITTLE CALENDAR.

The other day, when one of our Army Chaplains was home for a short furlough, he mentioned a difficulty met by men on active service who were trying to lead a Christian life. They wished to read a few verses of the Bible every day. But the various Bible Reading Unions all chose passages from all over the Bible, and a Testament was as much as they could conveniently carry. Moreover, the Prayer Book Calendar Lessons were generally too long. So there was a need for a series of Short Readings, confined to the New Testament.

This want THE LITTLE CALENDAR is intended to meet. On Sundays and Holydays the Reading is usually from the Epistle or Gospel. On other days the Readings are for several days nearly consecutive, and month by month they illustrate some aspect of Christian Calling.

Much Bible Reading is of little profit, because the pith and marrow of it is not gathered up into prayer; and much prayer is stale and unhelpful because it has no fresh inspiration behind it. So a reference to some suitable Prayer Book prayer follows each reading. In this way the reading can be made more practical, and some of the wealth of devotional material in the Prayer Book can be illuminated by the lamp of God’s Word.

It is suggested also that THE LITTLE CALENDAR may serve as a bond between the absent. If soldiers and sailors on active service knew that their friends at home were daily reading the same passage and using the same prayer, it would make the Communion of Saints a more real and stronger thing, and as THE LITTLE CALENDAR, though specially prepared for soldiers and sailors, has nothing in it that is not adapted for general use, it is hoped that other people may like to use it, and be glad to think of those who are using it too.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, December 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/12)

Comforts and Christmas cheer for those brave men nobly fighting for King and Country

People in Winkfield energetically raised funds for Christmas presents to send to serving soldiers from the area.

THE RUMMAGE SALE in the Parish Room on November 9th was a great success. Although the weather was abominable it did not seem to deter people from coming, for immediately on opening the room was crowded with buyers.

Lord George Pratt who had most kindly conveyed the goods from the Vicarage to the Parish Room, was also good enough to open the sale. In a few well chosen words he explained how anxious we were that the effort so successfully made last Christmas by Miss Montgomerie to raise funds for providing Christmas presents to our own men absent on Service should be repeated this year. Unfortunately we were losing the Miss Montgomeries from the parish, but Mrs. Maynard had undertaken to do her best to procure the necessary funds and see to the sending off of the presents. As however this year the number of men serving was greater and a larger sum must be provided, Mrs. Maynard had got up to this rummage sale in the hope that the proceeds would go a long way towards meeting the necessary expense.

He therefore urged those present to remember that by becoming purchasers they would be helping to provide comforts and Christmas cheer for those brave men from our parish who were nobly fighting for King and Country. We had contributed a fair share of men to this great cause, and, as one of the Recruiting Committee for East Berkshire, he hope that more still would follow their example.

His Lordship then declared the sale open and business commenced at once. All present availed themselves eagerly of the bargain prices, and sales were so brisk that in about an hour there was very little left, and the few articles that hung fire were for the most part quickly disposed of by Lord George, who made an excellent amateur auctioneer.

The receipts amounted to £12 13s. 8d. and inclusive of £4 10s. 0d., donations from some kind friends who could not send goods, a total of £17 3s. 8d. was raised and Mrs. Maynard is much to be congratulated on the result of her efforts. She begs to cordially thank all those who so kindly sent donations and articles for sale and also those ladies and gentlemen who helped her to classify and price the things, or assisted at various stalls.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, December 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/12)

The war has taken fresh toll of us

People in Winkfield were asked to save money, and to help support local soldiers with sewing parties.

THE VICAR’S LETTER.

MY DEAR FRIENDS,-

We are inserting in this month’s Magazine a leaflet entitled “How to save and why,” and I hope that all will read it carefully and try to act upon it, for it points out how those of us who cannot go out to fight can yet help our country at this most critical time…

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,
H. M. MAYNARD.

PARISH NOTES

The war has taken fresh toll of us, and this parish has to mourn the loss of Lieut. Malcolm Blane of the 5th Cameron Highlanders, who fell in action in Flanders on September 25th. He was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Blane of Foliejon Park, and very deep sympathy is felt for them by their friends in Winkfield in this overwhelming sorrow.

2nd. Lieut. Ralph Hayes-Sadler, Corporal J.B. King, and Private Reginald Knight have now gone to the Front and will, we trust, have a place in our prayers.

Private Albert Carter has again been wounded but is doing well in a Convalescent camp at the base.

Private John Chaney was wounded in the leg and has been bought back to England; he has progressed so well that we hope soon to see him back in Winkfield, convalescent.

William Faithfull has joined the colours and his name is added to the list of Honour.

We are glad to hear that Private Charles Greathan has now practically recovered from his very serious wound; also that Lance-Corporal A. Kimble though not yet allowed out of hospital is expected home shortly.

It was nice to see Lance-Corporal R. Nickless once more in his place in the choir on Sunday, October 10th. His wound had sufficiently healed to allow of his coming home on short leave before he joined his regimental depot at Reading.

NOTICE.

With reference to the announcement which appeared in last month’s Magazine of Working Parties for the benefit of the Winkfield men at the front, it has been arranged to commence these at the Vicarage on Thursday, November 4th, at 2.30, when Mrs Maynard will be pleased to welcome any who have relations serving and who would like to make comforts to send out to them at Christmas.

It is hoped to have these meetings weekly and to hold them (after the first one) on Wednesday afternoons.

A small RUMMAGE SALE, the proceeds of which will go towards helping to provide funds for materials, &c., will be held in the Parish Room on Tuesday, November 9th, at 2 o’clock. Admission to the sale 1d.

WINKFIELD FUEL FUND.

Owing to the increased price of coal and to the uncertain state of the coal market, the Trustees have decided that Messrs. Minchin, whose tender has been accepted, shall make two deliveries only, viz, before November 4th and between Dec. 1st and 31st. The deliveries will be to depositors of 4/6- 5¼ cwt. and 4 cwt., and to depositors of 3/6 – 4 cwt. and 3¼ cwt.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/11)