Victory in the Great European War

Lower Basildon CE School
30th July 1919

School closed this afternoon for the Summer Holiday. The Education Committee have granted an extra week’s holiday, in accordance with the wish expressed by King George, to commemorate the Victory in the Great European War.

Aldermaston School
30th July 1919.

School closed at noon today for summer holidays, His Majesty King George has expressed a wish that in commemoration of the signing of Peace the children should be granted an extra week’s holiday.

Newbury St Nicolas CE (Girls) School
31st July 1919

Peace Celebration sports were held in playground yesterday afternoon.

Log books of Lower Basildon CE School (C/EL7/2, p. 205); Aldermaston School log book (88/SCH/3/3, p. 108); and Newbury St Nicolas CE (Girls) School (90/SCH/5/5, p. 251)

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Soldiers throwing stones

Some people got a bit over-excited by the official end of the war.

Lower Sandhurst
July 4th 1919

Six or seven windows were broken by persons throwing stones on either Saturday or Sunday night. I am informed that soldiers belonging to the camp are the delinquents. Have written to the C.O. of the guard, and to the police.

Lower Basildon
4th July 1919

School closed on Friday afternoon, for a half holiday, on the occasion of the Signing of the Peace Treaty.

Boyne Hill
July 4th

On account of the Proclamation of Peace this morning, this afternoon is to be observed as a general holiday.

Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1); Lower Basildon CE School log book (C/EL7/2); Boyne Hill Girls’ CE School (C/EL121/3)

A scholarship resumed

Various teachers were serving their countries. The Education Committee had to deal with their absence.

Report of Higher Education Sub-committee, 13 January 1917

SCHOLARSHIPS

Mr E H Austin, whose County Scholarship at University College, Reading, was held over during his service in the Army, has not been passed for general service and has obtained postponement of embodiment to enable him to continue his College course. He has therefore returned to his studies.

Report of School Management Sub-committee, 13 January 1917

STAFFING

The Sub-committee record with regret that Mr Dowell, Assistant Master of Cranborne [sic] Ranelagh School, has been killed in action; and that Mr Glastonbury, Head Master of Thatcham CE School, and Mr R V Weaving, Assistant Master at Hungerford Council School, have been officially reported as “missing”.

LOWER BASILDON

The Managers have notifed their willingness to release their Head master for service in a larger School. The Managers have also agreed to allow the character of their School to be altered for the period of the war, the elder children being conveyed to Upper Basildon School; and Infants and Standard I only being taken at Lower Basildon School in charge of a Supplementary Teacher. The change takes effect from the beginning of the present term.

Report of By-Laws and Attendance Sub-committee, 13 January 1917

LOWER BASILDON CE

The Sub-committee have agreed to convey the elder children from Lower Basildon to Upper Basildon School, and on wet days back to their homes in the evening.

ATTENDANCE OFFICERS

The Sub-committee have appointed Mr E I R Walter as temporary Attendance Officer in place of Mr G H Edwards on Military Service.

Report of Education Finance Sub-committee, 13 January 1917

Mr J S James, first class clerk in the Secretary’s department, has been called up for military service and the Sub-committee have approved the appointment of a substitute to fill the vacancy.

Reports to Berkshire Education Committee, 1917 (C/CL/C1/1/20)

Closed for the period of the war

It was probably staffing shortages which led to a Basildon school closing for the duration of the war.

8th January 1917
Admitted fifteen scholars from Lower Basildon school which has been closed to the older children for the period of the war.

Basildon CE School log book (90/SCH/16/1, p. 419)

Christmas and its lessons in war-time

A Berkshire school saw its head teacher drafted to take over at another school whose head must have joined up, and half the children sent to yet another school.

Lower Basildon National School
20th December 1916

I have received a communication from Mr Anderson to the effect that, for the period of the war, I shall be transferred as Head Master to Cold Ash school.

The children from Std II upwards, will be transferred to Upper Basildon school, so that when school re-opens on Jan. 8., only the Infants and Std I will remain.

Lower Sandhurst School
December 20th 1916

Mr. W. J. Joye, Chairman of the Managers, visited the School and gave an address to the children on Christmas and its lessons in war-time. He at the same time commended them for their generosity in supporting the War Funds, over £16.10 and 1000 eggs having been contributed since August 1914.

Lower Basildon National School log book (C/EL7/2, p. 174); Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p. 383)

The greatness of an Empire depends on the moral greatness of its people

Empire Day was an opportunity for schoolchildren across the county to be instructed in patriotic matters.

Wargave: Empire Day at the Piggott Schools

Empire Day was celebrated at the Piggott Schools, on Friday, May 21st. Although rain fell heavily during the early part of the morning, it fortunately cleared off in time for the children, who numbered over 200, with flags flying, to start for Church where a short service was conducted by the Vicar. He delivered an inspiring address founded on the words “Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might,” Eccles. ix, 10, pointing out that God’s help is wanted if our daily life is to be successful and prosperous. On returning to the school play-ground the flag was saluted; the National Anthem and several patriotic songs were sung. In the unavoidable absence of Mr. H. C. Bond who had promised to speak to the children, the Vicar kindly addressed them on “Patriotism and the Empire,” Mr. Coleby proposed a vote of thanks to the Vicar and explained why this year’s celebrations was so much different from that of other years. In the first place the War naturally caused a difference, and, secondly by the vote of the children themselves, the proceeds of their concerts last month were given to the Reading War Hospital Care and Comforts Committee.

The following letter had been received from the Secretary:-

“My dear Children,

I write on behalf of my Committee to thank you very much for the lovely gift which I have received from your Headmaster, and which I understand is really your Empire Day “Tea.” I am quite sure that when Empire Day comes, without the Tea, that you will be even more happy than on other Empire Days; because you will remember that by your action, some of our soldiers who have been wounded while fighting for us, are made more cheerful and comfortable. It is fine to be allowed to do one’s bit, isn’t it?

Gifts of this kind are so great an encouragement to those who are working to obtain comfort for our soldiers.

With best wishes for a happy Empire Day.
I remain,
Yours faithfully,
Stanley H. Hodgkin,
Hon. Secretary.”

Cheers for the King concluded the proceedings.

A bag containing a bun and an orange was given to each child as he left the Schools. (more…)