“It was 60 to 100 at Lloyd’s yesterday there would be peace before Xmas”

Everyone could see the war coming to an end – even the German PoWs.

St Marys, Oct 31 [1918] Hallows Eve

My own darling own

Yesterday… a man called Savage with his wife quite intend on taking this place and if possible buying it. Evidently a very rich man in war profits having to do with all insurance societies, Lloyd’s included, & he told me it was 60 to 100 at Lloyd’s yesterday there would be peace before Xmas….

Meantime the papers are an hourly unrolling of great scrolls of prophecy fulfilled, and to be having a part in it must be a wonderful feeling, and how I long to talk to you, and how I long for the evening papers with news, if any, from Paris. I dread Bolshevik risings, and spread of that disease with Prussianism a fallen God? It is a tremendous thing to think what is in the hands of those few brains at Paris, and I cling to the knowledge that two at least there are with belief in the Eternal Righteousness revealed as Divine Love to those who follow Christ and company with him in sacrifice for the sake of that Righteousness? It must be hard to go on fighting with the world all crumbling that has opposed that righteousness, and it seems as if it – the victory – was already decided.

The news from Italy is glorious, and then Hungary & Austria & Turkey, and with the little bits of news coming in from the Danube – these waterways and tributaries in silence or in spate determining the way of victory. Well – here I watch our little road and the village passers by, and the trees getting bare, but still some golden glow slimes in at the window, and the only thing in touch with the war are the German prisoners no longer bursting with spirits & laughter and talk, but they look grim….

There is a great deal of mild flu about, and some measles, but I have heard of no bad cases so far. I have no sign of flu, only a very little cold of which I take quite abnormal care, & eat formamint lozenges without end….

Archdeacon Moore has resigned – and I am sorry – one of the few gentlemen left in that changing diocese where everything is going on socialistic lines, and I am so unhappy about poor dear Norman Lang, & cannot imagine what his future is to be when the 6 months at the front are over – & will he be needed there 6 months.

Do take care of yourself – send for formamint lozenges & have eucalyptus & a good tonic?

I suppose John will be all right. Maysie is moving to 6 Hill Street, Knightsbridge…

All my love, darling
Own Mur

Lady Mary Glyn to her son Ralph (D/EGL/C2/5)

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The conflagration may spread with no governments left to reconstruct the world

Lady Mary Glyn anticipated the Communist Revolution which would take place as Germany collapsed at the end of the war.

30 Half Moon St
London W
Oct 19 1918
My own darling

Railway facilities all much altered by the war….

John is to go for 3 months to GHQ on Wednesday on staff of General Ruggles Brise. Maysie will try to get small house or flat in London & stay near us & help our house hunt.

Your letter today – very interesting, and I find my views are not at all yours! And that you think Wilson has made disastrous mistakes, but I cannot help seeing the danger lies in another Bolshevist rising in Germany? And that the conflagration may spread with no governments left to reconstruct the world if we do not give a chance to the right people to make an enduring peace when the Armies judge the right moment has come?

It is evident that a long fight is ahead of us if the Hun saves the 195 Divisions, and has these and the navy to bargain with? And much is going on we can know nothing of; I have a faith that while soldiers must decide on the terms of Armistice, the statesmen (if we believe there are any left) must deal with the civilian element in all nations, and it is to these people that the decision will be given as to the form democratic government will take?

Meantime it seems to me to be the most solemn time when tremendous issues are at stake and that no human power can hold and keep the mind of man in place but the Divine Power, and in our recognition of what we call for want of a better – the “personal” Rule of that God in whose image we are all made. So it is a time for faith, & a glorious venture of faith. The demonstration has come – the vindication of the Righteousness for which we have ventured everything – that we should not mar and deface this glorious revealing through any passion for vengeance now which is not the avenging of divine justice is the paramount need, and I should trust Foch even more than Clemenceau? Clemenceau is said to be a man of no faith? It would be our undoing now not to be guided by men who believe in the powers of the world to come. We hold the lantern in our hands of a light that is not our own. We have to see that lantern is not darkened.

The world we know is full of private & individual sorrow, poor Norman Lang has lost his wife with this dread influenza…

My darling – how wonderful it would be if we were to have our Christmas together…

Own Mur


Lady Mary Glyn to her son Ralph (D/EGL/C2/5)

A model windmill

It is pleasing to know that the authorities had no objection to this internee’s wish to send a toy to his little nephews and nieces.

7th March 1918
R E Lang or Lange

The above named Alien asks permission to send out a little model windmill, which he has made, to his married sister at L’pool for her children.

Governor

Reading Prison [Place of Internment] letter book (P/RP1/8/2/1)

A picture postcard of Warfield for Christmas

Soldiers from Bracknell, Chavey Down and Warfield were among those to get Christmas gifts from home.

Bracknell

A scheme has been arranged under which a Christmas present will be sent to all our men from Bracknell parish who are on active service, either in Navy or Army.

A Committee has been formed to collect the necessary funds, and very many people have gladly contributed. There are now about 200 men on active service, so that it is no light task to do up and despatch the parcels. The Chavey Down parcels are packed by Miss Lang with others to help, and the Bracknell parcels are done up by a number of kind people who meet at the Vicarage Parish Room. A letter is sent in each parcel to explain that it is a small gift sent from friends at home, as a token that our husbands, sons and brothers, who are fighting for us, are never forgotten.

Warfield

Warfield Sailors and Soldiers Christmas Presents Fund seems a long title. Last year we had two funds running, one in connection with the Brownlow Hall Club, the other for non-members of the same. This year there has been an amalgamation, and through liberal donations from one and all, the sum has nearly reached £20. May I state here, in the event of this coming for the first time to the notice of any of our friends, that the Secretary and Treasurer to the Fund is Miss Hardcastle, Rectory House, Warfield, by whom further donations will be thankfully received. We are chiefly sending socks, mittens, cocoa, chocolate and cake, and a picture postcard of Warfield containing 8 views.

Winkfield District Magazine, December 1916 (D/P151/28A/12)

The war should arouse the careless to the existence of God

The Bishop of Peterborough wrote to his son Ralph Glyn with thoughts on the church’s response to the war.

The Palace
Peterborough

Jan 20 [1916]

My darling Ralph

We got your letters of 10th safe this morning, & it was delightful to hear of you & your doings. You have plenty to do & it must be delightfully interesting work. The press and country here seem to know that we did right to leave Gallipoli – & it was splendidly done – & quite wonderful to have so entirely bamboozled the wiley Turk that he knew nothing of it till it was all over – what fools they must have felt!

I expect two or three here today, including Bishop Lang, for a conference as to how we can get the Diocese prepared for some effort that will be made in the autumn or next year, for a National Spiritual Revival. We want it, as the Church has not learnt the lesson of the war – & it ought to be a great opportunity, when the war has made the other world so real & near, to arouse the careless to the existence & work of God, which they seem to have altogether forgotten.

John is trying to get some work at Windsor. His Board will not pass him as fit, & he is put back for two months at least.
….
E C Peterborough

Letter from the Revd E C Glyn to his son Ralph (D/EGL/C2/3)

Tricolour Day for the French

Ladies in Wargrave sold French flags and rosettes, and postcards of the local church, in aid of our wounded allies.

Tricolour Day

“The French Wounded Emergency Fund’s” special day, Tricolour Day, was kept in Wargrave on October 2nd, and a house to house collection and sale of tricolour rosettes and pennants and St. Michael’s postcards was made throughout the parish.

The following kindly collected: Mrs. Nicholl, with Mrs. Sanderson Furniss, Mrs. Theobalds, Miss Joan Wells, Miss Betty Wells, Miss Joan Crisp, and Mrs. Remnant collected in Hare Hatch and adjoining parts of the village; Miss Brenda Rhodes at Hennerton and near neighbourhood, Miss Goulding and Miss Cain in High Street, Miss Fairburn and Mrs. Churcher in part of the village, Miss Ryder, Mrs. Harry Wells, Miss G. Huggins, and Miss Dorothy Bell at the station, Miss Georgina Holland and Miss Joan Willis in Crazies Hill, and Miss M. Easterling and Miss Wyatt part of Victoria Road.

Very many thanks are due to these kind helpers for the success of the day and to the contributors, and also to the following ladies who kindly made themselves responsible for the making up of the rosettes and pennants sold on Tricolour Day: Mrs. Nicholl, Mrs. Bond, Miss Goulding, Mrs. Lang, Mrs. Remnant, Miss Cain and Mrs. Wedderburn.

The sum collected was £42 4s. 11d.

Wargrave parish magazine, November 1915 (D/P145/28A/31)