Back in the trenches again

More and more Winkfield men had headed to the Front.

Gunner Daniel Taylor has been wounded in the foot, and Pte. Edward Holloway in the shoulder; both are doing well.

We regret to learn that Pte. A.E. Burt, who was convalescent from a serious illness, has had a relapse, and is again in hospital. We sincerely hope that his relatives will soon have better news of him.

Pte. Edward Still having served his time in the Coldstream Guards, has rejoined the Colours and is now with the 14th Devons at the Front.

Pte. George Holloway has also just gone to the front.

Pte. Cecil Jenden recently wrote to the vicar that he has quite recovered from his wound, and is now back in the trenches again.

We were very glad to see Pte. George Benstead again in his place in the Choir for two Sundays; though lame from his wound he is able to get about, and we trust will soon be completely recovered.

We congratulate Lance-Corporal Edward Thurmer and Lance Corporal Brant on gaining their stripe.

The following men from our Parish have just joined His Majesty’s Forces:-

Pte. Albert Brown, A.S.C. Mechanical Transport.
Pte. George Clayton, 3rd Royal Berks.
Pte. A. E. Gardner, 4th Northants.
Pte. George Franklin, 10th Sussex Regt.
Pte. William Harwood, 3rd Royal Berks.
Pte. James Summer, R.F.A.

We hope this Christmas to be able again to send small Christmas presents to the men from our parish now serving, but as their numbers this year are so great we shall need more generous help than ever to enable us to send even a very small token of remembrance to each. Mrs. Maynard is arranging to have a small rummage sale in the Parish Room at the end of November to help raise some of the necessary funds, and she would welcome any articles for this sale.

She would also be glad to receive as soon as possible from their relatives the full addresses of any men serving in Mesopotamia or Egypt, for their gifts ought to be dispatched by the middle of November.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1916 (D/P151/28A/11)

Advertisements

The first great military award gained by a Winkfield man

A number of Winkfield men had been wounded or were unwell.

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING

We regret to learn that Pte. Jack Dean has been wounded with a bullet wound through the left leg. He is in hospital in England and writes cheerfully, so we hope he is doing well.

Pte. George Benstead has been moved from the hospital in France to England. He writes to the Vicar that he is so much better that he hopes shortly to be home and able once more, for a time, to take his place in the choir again.

Pte. Fred Holmes, Pte. W. Franklin, and Pte. C. Jenden have also been wounded; they have been in England some time and are now convalescent.

Pte. C.E. Burt has been seriously ill with rheumatic fever, but is better, and we trust now out of danger.

Pte. Fred Blay joined the Army Service Corps last month and Fred Knight joined H.M.S. Impregnable.

Corporal Reginald Nickless and Privates Leonard Cox and George Faithful, having recovered from wounds or sickness have returned to the front, also Private Norman Nickless has gone out, and we trust all will find a place in our prayers.

Most of us have heard with great pleasure and satisfaction that the Military Medal (and promotion to Lance-Corporal) was won by Edwin Gray for gallantry on July 1st at Deville Wood. This good news ought to have appeared in the August Magazine, but though now belated it is fitting that a record be made in the Parish Magazine of what is, we believe, the first great military award gained by a Winkfield man, and we heartily congratulate Lance-Corporal Edwin Gray and his relatives on this distinction.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, October 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/10)

Why should the young do all the fighting and the dying and offer the great sacrifice by themselves?

The people of Winkfield were urged to support the young men who were heading to the Front.

VICAR’S LETTER

MY DEAR FRIENDS,

When you receive this Magazine we shall be nearing the completion of a year of War, and this fact cannot fail to solemnize in our minds and make us seriously consider whether we are one and all doing our duty in this supreme crisis of our Nation’s history.

The call to service and sacrifice has been answered by numbers of our young men – a list of whom is printed in this month’s Magazine – but have we who are unable to offer ourselves for active service contributed all we can and ought to the common cause? As the Bishop of London says, why should the young do all the fighting and the dying and offer the great sacrifice by themselves? The sacrifice that is for all should be offered by all, and all are bound to make the resolution “I will pray, I will repent, I will serve, I will save.”

And yet we must sorrowfully confess that the army of intercessors to offer prayer as sacrificial as the self-oblation of the millions of men who have offered themselves for war, has not been forthcoming; unlike France or Russia, out Churches have not been filled with men and women to pray for the men whose peril and blood is their shield, and I must confess to much heart sickness and disappointment that even our intercessory services in the second Sunday evenings and the last Sunday mornings in the month have not been better attended.

What is the explanation? It cannot be that we are indifferent to our country’s need or without love to our brothers at the Front; nor is it that England does not believe in God; there is enough love of our country and enough belief in God to crowd our Churches with earnest suppliants. What then is lacking? Is it not the belief in prayer and especially the belief in united supplication in God’s house? Is not the lack of this the reason why the men and women who ought to be in the praying line have not proved so steadfast as the men in the fighting line, who so greatly need our prayers, and surely have a right to expect them.

I sincerely hope therefore that large numbers will make a real and special effort to attend the special Intercession Services on Wednesday, August 4th and on Sunday, August 8th, of which notice is given in another column. The result of this war will depend very largely on the atmosphere of prayer which has been created, for prayer is the strongest force in the world, and as has been truly said, through prayer we bring our nation and our Allies into contact with Christ, and set the life of the whole Society as well as individuals in the stream of that purpose of redemptive love which can overrule even war for God.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,
H. M. MAYNARD.

PARISH NOTES

Lieut. Godfrey Loyd and Private Henry Hoptroff have just gone to the Front, and Privates Edwin Gray, Ernest Gray, Edward Holloway and Lance-Corporal Reginald Nickless are under orders to be in readiness to go immediately. We trust that they and their naturally anxious relatives will have a place in our prayers.

Much sympathy is felt for the family of Private John Williams (Royal Field Artillery) who died in hospital after a very long and distressing illness. He was buried with full military honours at Cosham Cemetery on July 1st, and special memorial prayers were said for him on Sunday, July 4th.

NOTICE

On Wednesday, 4th August, the anniversary of the declaration of war, a great service in St. Paul’s Cathedral has been arranged, when the King and all the leaders of the nation will attend to inaugurate the second year of the war be asking God’s help. In Winkfield Church, there will be Celebration of the Holy Communion at 8 a.m., and Litany and Intercession at 11 a.m. Also Evensong and Intercession at S. Mary the Less at 7.30 p.m.

On Sunday, August 8th, both morning and evening, there will be special services with Intercessions and Thanksgivings for the way in which the country has been preserved from many dangers.

The following is list of Winkfield men serving in His Majesty’s Forces at Home and Abroad.
(more…)

“The sad news has definitely come”

News was sometimes slow to reach families at home. One Winkfield man was killed in the wars first month, but only in the spring did the sad news reach his family. They also now had to worry about two of his brothers following his example.

VICAR’S LETTER
MY DEAR FRIENDS,-
Once again I must thank you very cordially and whole-heartedly for your kind and generous “Easter offering” and, as we have no Parish Social this year, let me now take the opportunity of thanking heartily the Wardens, Sidesmen, Sunday School, Teachers, Choir, Bell-ringers, and all other helpers in parish work.

I would refer you to the account of the Easter Vestry meeting for a summary of the Church accounts, and though our balance in hand for Church expenses has, owing to the expenditure of rather large sums on necessary repairs, been largely reduced, yet we still have a satisfactory balance on the right side.

Last year I was able to report an increased amount in the offertories given away, and so it is indeed cheering to know that this year we have eclipsed all records in this respect, and our special offertories for outside purposes have considerably more than doubled those of last year.

This is, of course, largely owing to special offertories for various War funds, and I trust that the lessons of self-denial and self-sacrifice which the war is teaching us will be fully learnt and continue to influence us when we once more enjoy the blessings of peace.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,
H. M. MAYNARD

PARISH NOTES

OUR ROLL OF HONOUR.
The following names have lately been added:
James Thurmer
Edward Thurmer
Albert Streamer
George Streamer
Lawrence Frederick Webb

Privates George Chaney, Cecil Jenden, Harry Ottaway, and Harry Rixon have just gone to the Front, and we will trust be remembered in our prayers.

We are glad to be able to state that Private John Williams is now much better and, we hope, is well on the road to complete recovery from his dangerous illness.

We much regret to announce that Private Charles Streamer was killed on August 26th. Some months ago it was reported that he had been wounded, but no information as to his whereabouts was forthcoming ; but now the sad news has definitely come of his death in the service of his Country.

Memorial prayers were said for him on Sunday, April 25th, when there were present several members of his family to whom our sympathies go out. His two brothers, George and Albert, have just joined the Royal Berks Regiment.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, May 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/5)

A fight for liberty and honour

The Winkfield parish magazine had news of local soldiers, and a report on the Christmas gifts sent out to the Front. It also took a look back at the lessons of history and the possible meaning for the present war.

We have heard with regret of the death in action of William Cartland, aged 21. He was severely wounded and died the same day.

William Cartland lived here until he enlisted in the Army about three years ago; he was confirmed in 1909, and was a communicant and member of our Guild. He will be deeply mourned by many friends in Winkfield who loved and respected him, and much sympathy is felt for Mrs. Cartland and family in their great loss.

Our wounded.
We welcome home Pte. Albert Carter for a brief rest and convalescence.

Pte. Charles Reed who left for the Front only a few weeks ago, is in hospital at Southampton with frost-bitten legs and rheumatic fever, but we rejoice to hear that he is already convalescent; also that Pte. Charles Lunn, who was wounded, is progressing well in hospital.

We much regret that no further news has been heard of Pte. Charles Streamer, who was reported wounded. It was thought that he was in hospital in England, but the War Office can give no news of his whereabouts, and much sympathy is felt for his relatives in their great anxiety.

We were delighted to see at the beginning of the month Cecil Hayes-Sadler who obtained a few days well earned leave from the Front after some months of most useful and hazardous work as a despatch rider. Mr. Hayes-Sadler has the honour of being the first of our Winkfield Volunteers to get out to the Front.

‘15

In the days when Britannia’s rule of the waves was being established, “the Fifteen” was a common phrase in England to describe the attempt of the “Old Pretender” to regain the crown which his father James II., lost by interfering with the liberties of the English people. A. D. 1715 was the date of that attempt. Few of us, in the present time of trouble, are likely to forget another “Fifteen,” when on June 18th, 1815, 22,000 British Soldiers with a mixed force of 45,000 allied troops withstood 80,000 French veterans on the field of Waterloo. That, too, was a fight for liberty and honour. But the greatest “Fifteen” of all was seven hundred years ago. John, King of England and France had made one of the many attempts of the Norman Kings to destroy the customs and freedom of the English over whom he ruled. At the Island of Running-mead in the Thames Valley, on June 19th, 1215 he was brought to book, signing the Magna Charta, which has since become the charter of freedom not only in England but of the whole civilised world. Again and again John’s successors have tried to revoke that charter – again and again they have been brought to book. At last England grew tired of the incessant struggle and banished the last to break the peace of the realm (James II.). This settled the question, perhaps for ever. Is it too much to hope that out of 1915 may come a similar judgement on rulers who break the peace of Europe?

SOLDIERS’ AND SAILORS’ CHRISTMAS PRESENT SCHEME.

This has now reached a satisfactory conclusion, and 51 parcels have been dispatched. The following warm things were sent out : 24 undervests, 22 pairs of gloves, 8 pairs of socks, 9 helmets, 2 mufflers, 7 mittens, 2 knitted purses, 1 belt, 4 dozen khaki handkerchiefs, 4 air cushions, 2 other presents; and each parcel contained also such items as these: cigarettes, matches, candles, chocolate, soap, string, writing paper, safety pins, a “first aid” to French, and cough lozenges.

Miss Montgomerie wishes to thank all those who helped to bring this undertaking to a satisfactory issue, especially Mrs. Brant and Miss. Jenden, both of whom have given most kind assistance.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District MonthlyMagazine, January 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/1)

Every young man should know his duty

The Winkfield parish magazine was proud that many of its young men had joined up (and one female nurse), but urged others to follow them. They also shared a poem more notable for its keen patriotism than its literary merits.

Our Choir has been denuded of about half its senior members, five of them having volunteered for Foreign Services in answer to their country’s call.

We may perhaps feel rather proud of the number of men from this parish who are now serving their Country in this great National crisis, but it may well be that there are still some holding back who ought to come forward in response to the stirring appeal “Your King and Country need you.” As the Bishop of Chelmsford has truly said, “In this war or right against wrong every young man should seek to know his duty, and when he knows it face it even unto death.”

Besides a large number who have enrolled themselves as Special Constables, 45 young men of the parish are now either serving at the Front or undergoing training to take their part in this great war. We print a copy of the list posted on the Church door, and hope that more names will soon be added to this list of honour which perhaps at the end of the war may take more permanent form of a board or tablet so as to hand down to future generations the names of those who fought in the brave days of old.

NOW AT THE FRONT

Blunden, Horace Frank Ottaway, Ernest (Navy)
Brant, George Ottaway, Harry
Carter, Albert Reed, Charles
Harris, Herbert Rixon, Fred
Hayes-Sadler, Cecil Simmonds, John S. (Navy)
Lunn, Charles Streamer, Charles
Mitchell, George (Navy) Taylor, William (Navy)
Mitchell, Henry Thurmer, Ernest
Ottaway, Albert Woodage, Walter

Sister Constance Druce.

UNDERGOING TRAINING

Banstead, George Hoptroff, Henry
Berney, Thomas Reedham Jenden, Cecil
Chaney, George Kimble, Archibald
Chaney, John Maynard, Forster H.M.
Diaper, Arthur Nickless, Reginald
Fisher, William Nickless, Wallace
Gray, Edwin Parrott, William
Greatham, Charles Reed, Walter
Harris, Ernest Rixon, Henry
Hayes-Sadler, Ralph Spears, William
Hipple, George Thurmer, William
Holloway, William Thurmer, Robert
Holmes, Arthur Webb, Albert
Holmes, Fred

(more…)