A social evening for soldiers and sailors

7 May 1919

A social evening was held by the members of the HWI on Wednesday May 7th at the Girls; School to entertain the soldiers & sailors who had returned from serving with the colours.

Hurst WI minutes (D/EX1925/33/1/1)

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Still without coal

Fuel was still in short supply.

30th April 1919

The school is still without coal so there was no meeting. Only 30 boys put in an appearance. Temperature of the room 44 degrees.

Hurst C of E Boys School log book (D/P73/28/23, p. 43)

A thrilling escape

Philip Godsal, sone of a Welsh landowner, was captured early in the war, and eventually made a daring escape in 1917.

5 February 1919

Monthly Meeting

A most interesting lecture was given by Capt Philp Godsal on his experiences as a prisoner of war in various camps in Germany, and his thrilling escape to Holland.

Hurst WI minutes (D/EX1925/33/1/1)

The headmaster of Three Mile Cross has received his discharge from the army

Things were getting back to normal.

Husrt
13th January 1919

I have been informed by the Education Secretary that the headmaster of Three Mile Cross has received his discharge from the army, therefore Mr Darlington will return to Hurst Boys’ School.

Speenhamland
Jan 13th

Letter from Mr Jeeves to say that the children had collected £2.0.3 during the Christmas holidays for St Dunstan’s Hostel.

Log books of Hurst C of E Boys School (D/P73/28/23);St Mary’s CE School, Speenhamland (C/EL119/3)

Queen Mary’s noble example has helped us be brave

Hurst WI rejoiced at the end of the war.

To Her Most Gracious Majesty Quueen Mary from the Women’s Institute of Hurst, Berks, membership 95.

We the members of the Hurst Women’s Institute being deeply sensible of your Majesty’s sympathy with our services & trials in the last few years beg that you will accept our humble congratulations in the termination of the war. We know that whatever have been our sufferings & deprivations that they have been equally shared by our Queen, & this knowledge has enabled many of us to be brave. Now that a calm joy fills our hearts we are anxious to share this also with your Majesty whose noble example has uplifted us all & whose personal sympathy has done so much to rivet the people’s affections ever more firmly to your Majesties.

Signed
Alice Martin
President

Wed Dec 4, 1918

Draft address to Queen Mary from Hurst WI (D/EX1925/33/5/2/1)

We have now finished blackberry picking

The terrible flu epidemic hit Hurst.

Hurst
25th October 1918

Some of the boys in the lower class are away with influenza. School closed for a fortnight owing to influenza.

Hampstead Norreys
25th Oct.

We have now finished blackberry picking & altogether this school has picked 2001 lbs. With Filsham (177 ½ lbs) and Yattendon (163 ½ lbs) we have sent away 2,342 lbs.

On “Our Day”, 24th Oct., we collected £6 7s 0 ½ d for the Red Cross Funds.

Reading
1918
Oct 25

School closed till the 5th Nov. because of the prevalence of Influenza. Three teachers – Miss Tilley, Miss Godwin, and Mrs Page, away through influenza.

25th October 1918
A Lantern lecture was given in the schoolroom this evening by Dr Smith – the proceeds going to the Red Cross Fund.


Log books of Hurst C of E Boys School log book (D/P73/28/23, p. 39); Hampstead Norreys CE School (C/EL40/2); St John’s School, Reading (D/P172/28A/23); Aston Tirrold CE School log book (C/EL105/1, p. 168)

For the duration of the war

The harvest was over.

Thatcham
October 4th 1918

The children were taken to gather blackberries. This will be the last time this season – 2 tons 9 cwt 1lb of fruit have been sent away.

Braywick
4th October 1918

Two half days were granted this week for picking berries and the girls got quite a nice supply.

Little Coxwell
Oct 4th

The children are going out to pick blackberrying [sic] for the last time. Registers not marked in the afternoon.

Hurst
4th October 1918

The school managers having given permission, the Education Committee has transferred me to the Three Mile Cross Council School for the duration of the war and Mrs Darlington has been appointed to take charge of this school during my absence.

Chilton
October 4th

A holiday given all day for the children to gather blackberries.

Log books of Francis Baily Primary School, Thatcham (90/SCH/15/1, p. 49); Braywick CE School (C/EL65/4, p. 205); Hurst C of E Boys School (D/P73/28/23, p. 38); Little Coxwell CE School (C/EL80); Chilton CE School (D/P36/25/1)

Taking charge for the duration of the war

Berkshire children continued to gather fruit for jam, while some teachers were still being redeployed to cover shortages.

Hurst
1st October 1918

The head master was asked by the Education Secretary to the visit the council school at Three Mile Cross near Reading and interview the Head Teacher of that school preparatory to taking charge for the duration of the war.

East Ilsley
1st October 1918

Elder children & those whose parents wished allowed the afternoon to get another day picking black-berries. Probably the last.

Little Coxwell
Oct: 1st

Registers will not be marked in the afternoon as the older children are going blackberrying.

Aldermaston
1st October 1918.

Half day for blackberrying, no baskets arrived and berries not sent off.

Datchet
1 October 1918

Blackberrying this afternoon.

Sparsholt
Oct 1st

The children had half holiday for blackberry picking.


Log books: Datchet School (SCH30/8/3); East Ilsley CE School log book (C/EL39/1, p. 487); Hurst School (D/P73/28/23); Little Coxwell CE School (C/EL80); Aldermaston School (88/SCH/3/3); Sparsholt CE School D/P115/28/47)

Fruit and nuts for gas masks

Wallingford boys were collecting various kinds of fruit.

Wallingford
1918, 18 September

Visited (pm) by Mr J Brown in connection with arrangements for collection of blackberries. We are already collecting nut-shells and plum-stones, for carbon used in gasmasks.

Hurst
18th September 1918

School closed the whole day owing to the Hurst fete at Staines Hill for the providing of funds for the Hurst prisoners of war.

Aldermaston
18th September 1918

Half holiday, 68lbs of blackberries.

Buscot
Sept. 18th

Older children gathered 88 ½ lbs blackberries – sent to Faringdon.

Log books: Wallingford Boys Council School (SCH22/8/3); Aldermaston School (88/SCH/3/3, p. 94); Hurst C of E Boys School (D/P73/28/23, p. 37)Buscot CE School (C/EL73/2);

Soldiers saved from paupers’ funerals

The Comrades of the Great War Society was established to help discharged soldiers and the families of those killed.

5 June 1918

Monthly Meeting

The meeting opened with an excellent address by Major Vaughan Williams on the objects of the “Comrades of the War” Association for the after-care & comfort of our fighting men. He showed how they look up all claims for pensions & give all legal advice required, & help in every way to assist widows & children.

They had already in Berkshire saved soldiers from paupers’ funerals. Major Vaughan Williams spoke most strongly on what we owe to the devotion of our soldiers.

Hurst WI minutes (D/EX1925/33/1/1)

Insured against aircraft

Hurst almshouses were insured against the risk of being bombed.

11th April 1918

Aircraft policies.

The clerk having asked for instructions with regard to the renewal or otherwise of the Insurance under the aircraft policies.

It was unanimously resolved: that the above Insurances be renewed for the current year.

Hurst Parochial Charities trustees’ minutes (D/QX30/1/4)

Ladies and younger lads keep the bells going, with energy & zeal

Bellringers reflect on the ways the war had changed their profession.

The annual meeting of this branch took place at Wokingham on Sat. Jan. 19th. A short service was held at All Saints’ Church at 4.30 pm with Intercessory Prayers…

The Rural Dean, Canon G F Coleridge, gave an excellent address, & practical, on the words – “Every man according to his ability” (Acts XI.29). He said he had chosen those words, because they brought home what was being done throughout the country regarding the “War”, at that time, & they should appeal with great force & meaning to those present, as Church Bell Ringers. Many of these, amongst other church officers, had been called to active service abroad, some of them from that branch, of whom some had given their lives for their country, & many ladies & younger lads had taken their places, & kept the bells goings, with an energy & zeal which would always be remembered in the Ringing world!…

The National Anthem was heartily sung at the close…

Tow members had been killed in action during the year. – A Edwards & F Collins, while G Collins was still “missing”, as in last year.

Minutes of Sonning Deanery Branch of the Oxford Diocesan Guild of Church Bell Ringers
(for bellringers of the parish churches of Arborfield, Easthampstead, Finchampstead, Hurst, Sandhurst, Sonning, Wargrave, Wokingham All Saints and Wokingham St Paul) (D/EX2436/2)

“2049 articles had been made in the last 4 months”

Hurst was the first WI in Berkshire, and its early work involved helping the Red Cross in war work.

2 January 1918
A meeting was held at the Working Men’s Club on January 2nd….A report of the Red Cross work connected with the Institute was read by Mrs Mellor. 2049 articles had been made in the last 4 months (9789 in the last 16 months) and these had been distributed to the hospitals.

Hurst WI minutes (D/EX1925/33/1/1)

A big problem at the present time

A teenage boy’s parents needed help getting him training funded, as the rising prices meant salaries no longer stretched as far as they had done before the war.

11th October 1917

Apprenticeship. D. D. Harrison’s charity.

The clerk read the following letter in respect to an application for the apprenticeship premium under Dame Dorothy Harrison’s Charity:-

Boys’ School House, Hurst
26-Sep-1917.

Dear Sir,

I wish to make an application to the trustees of Harrison’s Charity, Hurst, for assistance in apprenticing my boy Leonard Percival Darlington. The lad has just finished his school life & is at present
undergoing preliminary trial at the Pulsometer Works, Reading, with the idea of being indentured in November next. The expenses of educating the lad have been heavy & the premium of £25 required by the Reading firm is a big problem at the present time when prices are so great and the salary of an elementary schoolmaster is not excessive.

I should be much obliged if you would bring my application before the Trustees at their next meeting.

I am, Sirs, yours faithfully,

Leonard A. Darlington.

Mr Darlington attended before the Trustees in support of the above application, his son being unable to leave his employment.

It was resolved on the motion of the Rev’d E. Broome seconded by Mr. H. W. Verey: that the application be acceded to and that Leonard Percival Darlington be awarded an apprenticeship premium of £14 subject to the usual Indenture of Apprenticeship being entered into.

Mr Darlington was informed thereof and undertook to forward the clerk the necessary details for the Indenture when he had finally completed his arrangements with the Pulsometer Company.

The clerk was directed to insert an addition clause in the Indenture providing that in the event of Darlington being called upon to join the army, a proportionate part of the premium be returned to the Trustees.

Hurst Parochial Charities trustees’ minutes (D/QX30/1/4)

Aircraft insurance in Hurst and Twyford

A Hurst charity decided to insure its premises against damage from air raids.

12th January 1917

Air-craft Insurance.

It was resolved that the Air Craft Insurance on Shaftesbury Avenue property, Hurst Almshouses, and Twyford Almshouses be renewed for a further period of twelve months; and the clerk was instructed to apply to the Trustees of the Brockenborough Estate for payment of the premium on Twyford Almshouses.

Hurst Parochial Charities trustees’ minutes (D/QX30/1/4)