Our hopes of having a peaceful Christmas this year have been dashed to the ground

Reading people were encouraged to place their savings in the hands of the war effort as another Christmas approached.

The Vicar’s Notes

We are still at War, and our hopes of having a peaceful Christmas this year have been dashed to the ground; but this great Festival always brings a message of comfort and hope, never more so than at such a time as this: so I still venture to wish all the people of S. Mary’s Parish a happy Christmas.

The War Savings’ Campaign has begun again. I hope we will all back it up to the utmost of our power. Information can be obtained at the bureau, 6 Broad Street. A big meeting for stirring up interest will also be held at an early date. Meanwhile let those of us who have received the special letter from the Mayor and other leading townsmen, do what we can to follow out its suggestions.

Nothing can ever really repay the incalculable debt we owe to our Seamen especially at this time: so let us do our best to support the Flag Day of the Missions to Seamen, which is to be held on Dec 1st.

Intercessions

For the newly confirmed, who are making their first communion at Christmas.

For all our allies, especially the Italians and Russians.

For all our fighting men and more particularly for the sick, wounded and prisoners.

For the fallen, especially George and Hanbury Kekewich; also for Sir Stanley Maude, the victor of Bagdad [sic].

Thanksgivings

For success granted to our arms in France and in the Holy Land.

Reading St Mary parish magazine, December 1917 (D/P98/28A/15)

Ploughing new ground

Lawns and other land not normally ploughed was turned to growing crops for food during the war. Meanwhile, the news from Russia seemed to be better, although this was a false dawn.

14 November 1917

Ploughman & horse coming to plough up new ground (15 acres), more this year…

Russia better. Kerensky, Korniloff & Kaledin beaten rebels.

Allenby in Holy land very good.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/8)

Anxiety for the future of the Holy Land

Villagers from Hare Hatch were generous to the needs of Belgian refugees, while at Knowl Hill they were concerned about the impact of the war on Jerusalem, then in the control of enemy nation Turkey.

Hare Hatch Notes
The sum of £1. 16s. 5d, this month’s Belgian collection, has been acknowledged by the Hon. Treasurer.

Knowl Hill
The collections will be made as usual for the work of our Church in Jerusalem and the East; about which there is special anxiety now in consequence of the war. Few subjects are more interesting than the future of the Holy Land and the Mother City of the Church.

Wargrave parish magazine, April 1915 (D/P145/28A/31)