Reading St Giles intercessions list

Parishioners at Reading St Giles were asked to pray for their servicemen.

Notes from the Vicar

Intercessions List: Eric R.W. Gillmor (O.C.B.), R. Stanley Rudman.

Sick and Wounded: E.R. Righton, James Lambert, Victor Honor, Vincent Cherril, Alfred Honor, Edwin Richie, E.R. Righton, Fred Seymour.

Prisoners: Rifleman A. Pickford, Harry Kirby, Alfred H. Douglas, Harold Nicholson, Private Pavey.

Missing: Lieut Francis R.B. Hill, H.W. Tull, E.W. Kent.

Departed: Corpl. Percy E.H. Sales, Private Leonard Cozens, Private Jack Stevens, Robert Alfred Fryer, Frederick Gill, Sydney Alfred Smith, William Smith, John Oakley Holt. R.I.P.

Reading St Giles parish magazine, July 1918 (D/P96/28A/35)

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A great demand for women munition workers

The vicar of Reading called for women to sign up as trainee munitions workers.

Notes from the Vicar
Intercessions list:

Lieut. W.T. Stevens (6th Leicestershire Rgt.; Arthur Holt; Corpl. Wm Taylor.

To the list of the departed we must, alas, add the names of Lieut. Wm Marsden Cooper, Lieut. S. Wakeford.

There is still a great demand for Woman Munition Workers (aged 18 to 35) who are prepared to leave the district. They can be trained at University College.

Reading St Giles parish magazine, April 1917 (D/P96/28A/34)

This war and its terrible stress forces men to face reality

The vicar of Winkfield noted that some churches were full under the stresses of war – which he expected to last at least another year.

VICAR’S LETTER.

MY DEAR FRIENDS,

Soon after you get the February Magazine Lent, which falls very early this year, will have begun with its call to thoughtfulness and self-examination. And surely this War Year, the solemn Lenten Season will more than ever have its special message for all, and will be a “Call to Worship” to many who have neglected its opportunities in the past.

Our Nonconformist brethren have for some time been organising a “come to Church” campaign, and in most places attendance at public worship has largely increased, because this war with all its terrible stress and anxiety and forces men to face realities and is teaching us to look at the higher issues of life. May we then try to learn the lessons God would teach us by this trial and resolve to make a better use than ever before of this coming Lent; use to the full all the opportunities of public worship and make it a time of specially earnest private prayer for our brave Sailors and Soldiers, our Parish and our Country.

The calls on us during this time war are great, but I hope we shall not allow our usual Lenten self-denial savings purses for the Waifs and Strays to suffer; and that many will apply to the parish clerk or to myself for these purses.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,

H. M. MAYNARD.

OUR ROLL OF HONOUR.- A new list, kindly written out by Mr. Empson, has been made up to date and placed in the Church porch; the list now contains 60 names the following having been recently added:-

Bert King, Reginald Knight, Godfrey Loyd, Vivian Loyd, J. Franklin, Frank Payne, Leonard Tipper, Edward Still, Claud Williams, John Williams.

RED CROSS SOCIETY. – Since the war began the following articles have been forwarded from the Winkfield Branch to the Berkshire Branch at Reading.
140 day shirts, 72 night shirts, 29 bed jackets, 77 pairs of socks, 14 helmets, 16 pairs of operation stockings, 44 belts, 136 bandages, 29 pairs of gloves, 20 pairs of mittens, 5 pairs of bed socks, 9 comforters, 37 cushions.

Up to January 1st the Berkshire Branch sent out 2630 shirts; socks, 2790 pairs; vests, 1688; comforters, 540; night shirts, 700; mittens, 530; bed socks, 650. Of these a large number has been received by the Berkshire Regiment.

A satisfactory feature has been the large number of articles made by the mothers at Mrs. Ferard’s working parties. The value of the articles amounts to £55. To this, kind contributions have been given by Mrs. Asher, Mr. H. P Elliott, Lady Finlay, Mrs. Wilder, Mrs. Hayes Sadler, Mrs. Blakiston, Mrs. Louise Holt, Mrs. Ferard, Miss Thackrah.

It is hoped that further contributions may be received, for the work must not stop. So far as can be seen the stress of war will last another year at least and will seriously affect all of us remaining in England. But we should make every effort not to neglect those who are fighting for the defence of our lives and homes.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, February 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/2)