An awful, awful tragedy

Lady Mary Glyn wrote to Ralph again to let him know how her Red Cross and other war work was going.

Jan 18th [1916]…

We heard of the great doings at the G[reat] E[astern] Rest Room. Over 100 men there last night – 40 sailors, 60 men & then more, and an efficient staff of helpers. All night. Then in afternoon I … called on Recruiting Officer’s wife…

From 6 to 9 (with break for dinner) the Knights Chamber Private Registered Red X Work Party. 32 workers all in caps & white aprons and sleeves, and it is really a joy to see that Room full – all happy, and the long tables covered with clean oil baize, and your old nursery cupboard moved there to hold the material. I hear there is a tremendous “muddle” at Northampton, & as these inanities here appealed to Lord Spencer they have dragged him into their mesh of muddle, and I have written no word & keep silence, but events move, and things must take their course. Sir George Pragnell looks like a bulldog that will not easily let go, and the evidence he took from me was quite sufficient to show misapplication of money, and a vast trickery of the public they feared my action would bring to light. They would have done better to leave me alone!…

I read the papers and wish I knew what to think! Montenegro and its heights to add to the pecuniary burdens of ruined nations, but in the meantime how far adding to their resources?…

My whole love always
Own Mur

Ralph’s sister Meg also wrote to him, with thoughts on politics, and more on the Campbell family’s loss with the death of their cousin Ivar. (more…)

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Perhaps the end will come sooner than we think

Lady Mary Glyn wrote to her son Ralph with her latest thoughts.

Sunday Jan. 16 1916

I have seen your letter to Maysie & it gives me a sort of hope that you might come our way before going on to other far fronts, but I must be patient, and wherever you are I know you are doing good work…

Meg tells me that John & Billy have both got the Military Cross and I am glad. I do not like the account Meg gives me of John’s health, but it will at least keep him at home, and prevent his being sent out for some time, I hope. He talks now of light duty at Windsor; the Board is on the 20th….

I wonder how many of Hatchard’s books, magazines & reviews have reached you? I do not like stopping them, but you tell me you do not want them, [though?] it is all wrong not being able to send you something every week. One wants to be doing something, Scrappits.
Aunt Far will be with Aunt Syb, & not helping to make things easier, I fear. There will I think be much there to overcome…

The news requires an expert to understand, and at least there is not the nightmare of the Dardanelles, and as I firmly believe nothing happens that cannot be reduced to a greater good, and that no event or chain of events can deflect for one moment the sure grinding of the mills of God, and that whatever is, is passed into the Will of God to be controlled and made to work together for good, I do not worry about the right or wrong of the happening. It is easy to be wise after the event. We have to wander in a wilderness – I hope not for 40 years! – but until we are fit for the Promised Land, and every hour of those glorious victory making spirits on trial will hasten the end… Nothing is lost. I never believed in the breaking of this line or the other line but in the exhaustion of the country, and the determination of the peoples at last to end a war which was none of their making. And perhaps this will come sooner than we think?

Letter from Lady Mary Glyn to Ralph Glyn (D/EGL/C2/3)