“An incalculable amount of pain, many limbs, and indeed many lives must have been saved by the timely arrival of the bales”

Wargrave had been at the heart of work providing surgical supplies during the war.

Wargrave Surgical Dressing Society

This Society, which has just brought its work to a close owed its existence to the energies of Miss Choate.

At Millward’s, generously lent by the late Mr. Henry Nicholl and recently by Major C.R.I. Nicholl, was started by her in March 1915, a work which grew to such an extent that during the four years some 500,000 dressings and comforts were dispatched to the wounded from Wargrave. These were not, of course, all made in the village. Under Miss Choate’s organisation, branches were started at Dartmouth, Ledbury, Loughton, Pangbourne, Peppard, Shiplake and Wimbledon, while welcome and regular parcels were received from Twyford, Kidmore and Hoylake. But all were packed for shipment and consigned from Wargrave.

The parcels went to Hospitals and Casualty Clearing Stations at almost every fighting area – to Mesopotamia, to Gallipoli, to Egypt, to Serbia and to American and Colonial Hospitals in England and in France.

It is impossible to ever estimate the value of the work. An incalculable amount of pain, many limbs, and indeed many lives must have been saved by the timely arrival of the bales. As a lame man said to the writer “Only we who are still suffering the effects of the shortage of medical comforts at the beginning of the war can appreciate fully the work these people have done.”

In the early days, consignments were sent in response to urgent appeals from Commandants and Matrons of Hospitals, but since 1916 the Society, in common with other of the larger Societies in England, has worked under the direction of the Department of the Director General of Voluntary Organisations at the War Office.

A.B.

A meeting of the Society and the subscribers was held on Wednesday, Feb. 5th, at Millwards to decide upon the disposal of the Balance in hand. Every provision had been made for carrying on the work through the winter if the war had continued, and the funds amounted to over £200.

In the absence of Capt. Bird, the Vicar was asked to take the chair. After a full discussion it was unanimously resolved that £200 be given to the Ward Fund and Recreation Fund of the Manor Hospital, Hampstead.

It was a great happiness to all concerned to feel that the money should benefit a work with which Miss Sinclair was so closely associated.

It was resolved that the remaining balance be given to the Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading, for a Care and Comforts Fund for the Soldier Patients.

The accounts have not yet been audited but it is expected that the amount to be given to Reading Hospital will be about £20.

These resolutions, together with the audited accounts, must be submitted to the Charity Commissioners for approval, but there is every reason to think that they will be endorsed by them.

The men in the Manor House Orthopedic Hospital, Hampstead, for discharged Soldiers and Sailors, wish to send their grateful thanks to the Members of the Surgical Dressing Emergency Society, Wargrave, for their splendid gift (£200) to be used for their Care and Comfort. As many Wargrave ladies have consented to be god-mothers in the wards, it is the wish of the men that some of them should be on the new Committee, called the Care and Comforts Committee, who from time to time will decide how the money shall be spent. The appreciation of the men is very touching in its sincerity and sense of sympathy.

Wargrave parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

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Ordinary men and boys who have paid the extraordinary personal price

A new London hospital helped badly injured soldiers.

Wounded Soldiers

Miss Sinclair sends the following description of the Manor Orthopaedic Hospital, North End Road, Hampstead, which is the scene of her new work:-

“This Hospital is for the after treatment of discharged men from the army. Any man who has been a soldier and who in the opinion of his own doctor, would benefit by special expert treatment, can come to it, recommended by his own doctor, through the Pension Board. Everything in the Hospital is done for the patients but no one is accepted whose case is hopeless.

The Hospital is just starting and is growing at a wonderful rate, but it cannot grow quickly enough and there is a long waiting list.

These men are in their own clothes, many of them shabby and poor. But they stand for England’s Liberty, for the Liberty of the world, if they had not come out at the first call where would we be today? Where would all our homes be? They are ordinary men and boys. But they have paid the extraordinary personal price, which we have not paid, and can only pay by looking after them, and teaching the children to remember what they owe to the wounded men.

We have to thank the Surgical Dressings Society for coming quickly to our aid and for sending us promptly many beautiful gifts, to help meet the growing necessities of the Hospital wards, where we have so little, the help is enormously appreciated, and most of the articles sent are already in use.

Wargrave men can be sent here for treatment, our patients come from everywhere”.

Wargrave parish magazine, September 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)