So many are giving their lives for us that we may enjoy freedom, that we must be willing to make our smaller sacrifices and use our freedom unselfishly and for others

There was news of several Sulhamstead soldiers.

THE WAR

We congratulate Mrs Grimshaw upon her son’s latest honour. Captain Grimshaw, MC, has been awarded the Croix de Guerre, Senior Class (with Palm).

Mr Harry Frank Wise, Queen’s Own Oxford Hussars, who proceeded to France in October, 1914, has been given, on the field officer’s recommendation, rank as lieutenant.

We regret to record many casualties and one death since our last issue. Colour Sergeant Major Robert East, 3rd Battalion AIF, has been returned home seriously wounded. His leg has been amputated above the knee, and he lies in a very serious condition. It will be remembered that his brother, Private Amos East, was returned seriously invalided. At the same hospital as C. Sergeant Major Robert East is Gunner Reginald Briant Brown, RFA, son of Mr Brown of Jame’s Farm, Lower End, [who] is also lying wounded.

Private Albert Painter, 8th Berks Battalion, Stretcher Bearer, has been missing since March 31st.

Amongst others connected with the parish, we have received tidings of the death of Private Ernest Brown, RFA, son of the late Mr Henry Brown of the Kennels.

It is with great sorrow that we announce two deaths. Private Henry Bonner, 2nd Battalion, Royal Berks Regiment, was killed in action during the period from March 22nd to April 2nd. This is all the War Office can communicate.

The second death was that of the son, Samuel, of Mr and Mrs Locke. He was sent back to England wounded, died in Hospital at Reading, and was buried at Shinfield on May 14th. It is only a few months since his brother’s death. So many are giving their lives for us that we may enjoy freedom, that we must be willing to make our smaller sacrifices and use our freedom unselfishly and for others.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, June 1918 (D/EX725/4)

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A single cabbage helps the war

Sulhamstead people were supporting the war effort in their vegetable gardens, while rejoicing in good news of local soldiers.

THE WAR
Lieutenant H. A. Grimshaw has been mentioned in Sir John French’s despatches. This makes the second time that he has been so honoured. He has also been awarded the additional honour of the Military Cross.

It is with great thankfulness that the news has been received that Lieutenant Albert Marsh, RNR, of the “Tera”, sunk in the Mediterranean Sea, is safe, although held a prisoner.

ROLL OF HONOUR
George Derring, second footman at Folley [sic] Farm when the war broke out, was killed by the bursting of a shell at the Front in France.

VEGETABLES FOR THE SOLDIERS’ HOSPITALS
It is a bad time of the year for vegetables, but the Boy Scouts are trying to send a hamper to Reading every week. If any have got vegetables they would like to give to the hospitals, and would send them to the School on Mondays, or leave word at the School in the previous week, a Scout would fetch them. The hamper goes on Tuesdays. A single cabbage, half a dozen potatoes, etc, soon swell the contents.

THE LIGHTING ORDER
This order will not affect our Lower End Service as the room is furnished with dark green curtains, but it will prevent services being held on week days in Lent in the Church or School, and accordingly special meetings will be held in the large room at the Rectory on Thursdays at 7 pm.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, March 1916 (D/EX725/3)

An excellent flier

Four men with connections to Sulhamstead had different experiences in the war.

THE WAR
The flying of 2nd Flight Lieut. Gerald Merton is so excellent that he has been given a permanent appointment as Instructor at the Depot.

Mr George Leake has been given a commission as 2nd Lieutenant in the 3rd, 4th City of London Royal Fusiliers.

Lieutenant A. Grimshaw is now out of danger. The authorities felt that he must be moved from the noise of London, so he has been transferred to Sutton Place, the residence of Lord Northcliffe, who has placed it as a hospital at the disposal of the Government.

ROLL OF HONOUR
Lieutenant W. Edwards, of the Black Watch, killed in France in the Expeditionary Forces. Lieut. Edwards was formerly a pupil at the Rectory.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, July 1915 (D/EX725/3)

Sulhamstead and the wounded

News of new recruits and wounded men dominated the Sulhamstead parish magazine this month, as Sulhamstead House (now the Police Training College) joined the ranks of war hospitals.

THE WAR
Commissions

Mr Norman Watson has been given a commission of Second Lieutenant in the Kings Royal Rifles.

Mr General Merton has gained his “wings” after many months of practice in flying and has been appointed a Second Flight Lieutenant.

The Recruiting Sergeant has been busy in Sulhamstead and in the neighbourhood. At the time of going to press it is stated that nine more recruits have been obtained in Sulhamstead.

Wounded
We regret to hear that Lieutenant Grimshaw has been seriously wounded. Although a cavalry officer, he was serving in the trenches when he received his wounds from an explosion of shrapnel causing 18 wounds. He has been brought to Guy’s Hospital.

Robert East is also amongst the wounded, and is lying at the Hospital at Birmingham.

Lieut. Noel Carter was wounded in the trenches near Ypres some weeks ago, and was taken to the hospital at Fishmongers’ Hall, London. The Scouts will be glad to hear that he has recovered and is expecting to return to France.

CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL: SULHAMSTEAD HOUSE
Sir George and Lady Watson have opened their house as a Convalescent Hospital for the wounded. Fourteen wounded soldiers were sent from the Reading Base Hospital, of whom, ten had left at the time of writing, after more than a fortnight’s stay. They were very loth to leave as they had so thoroughly enjoyed their convalescent stage at Sulhamstead House.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, June 1915 (D/EX725/3)

Children’s concert in aid of the wounded

The children of Sulhamstead decided to put on a concert in aid of wounded soldiers. The programme combined patriotic songs, popular folk songs and a short play.

CHILDREN’S CONCERT IN AID OF THE WOUNDED

Our children, anxious like all others, to help in some way, proposed to Mr Leake that they should get up a concert for the Red Cross Work. Mr Leake cordially threw himself into their wishes, and an excellent concert to a crowded room on June 4th was the result.

The programme was as follows, from which it will be seen that all the performers, with the exception of Miss Wicks, the accompanist, belonged to Sulhamstead:-

God Save The King, 3 verses.
Britains [sic], Raise Your Banners High School Children
Rule Britannia School Children
Song, Go To Sea Mr Ward
Come Lasses And Lads School Children
The Girl I Left Behind Me School Children
Song, Tipperary Mr Ward
Charlie Is My Darling School Children
Early One Morning School Children
Distribution of Prizes and Clasps and Bars
Song, For The Green Miss B Leake
Song, Thora Rev. E G Drummond
Short Interval
Chldren’s Play, The Teasy Tea Party 6 girls and 2 boys
Song, Annie Laurie Miss Leake
Song, Nelson’s Gone a’Sailing Mr Ward
Somewhere A Voice Is Calling Miss B Leake
Song, The Trumpeter Rev. E G Drummond
God Save The King
Accompanist: Miss Wicks

The net proceeds of the concert amounted to £1. 18s. which has been handed to Mrs Grimshaw, the secretary of the Red Cross in Sulhamstead.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, July 1915 (D/EX725/3)

Churches crowded

The Sulhamstead parish magazine had some thoughts on the religious response to the war, at home and abroad, as well as reporting news of local soldiers who have been honoured or have fallen:

THE WAR

It is publicly announced that the churches in France are crowded with praying worshippers.

It is with much pleasure and congratulations that are read in the list of men mentioned in dispatches, the name of Lieut. H A Grimshaw, of “The Abbotts”…. Lieut. H A Grimshaw has received his 1st Lieutenancy since his arrival at the Front. The engagement from which this honour has arisen, was the famous attack of the Prussian Guards in November last, when the finest regiment in Germany was hurled against the British Forces.

A handsome Brass has been placed in the chancel of St Michael’s Church by Colonel Thoyts in memory of his son, bearing the following inscription: –

“In loving tribute to the memory of Francis Gordon Thoyts, Major, Somerset Light Infantry (second son of Colonel N B Thoyts, sometime lord of the manor of Sulhamstead), who gave his life for his King and Country at Beauvois in the great war, on August 26th, 1914.”

The Brass was sanctioned by the Archdeacon, instead of incurring the expenses of a faculty.

LENT SPECIAL SERVICES
Lower End Tuesdays at 7 pm
St Michael’s Church Thursdays at 7 pm.

At these services the special form of Litany of Intercession for our cause and our sailors and soldiers will be used. All who have any relations engaged in His Majesty King George’s Service are earnestly invited to attend and join in constant Intercession for them.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, March 1915 (D/EX725/3)