One of life’s failures

St Augustine’s Home was a home for boys in need in Clewer, run by the Sisters of the Community of St John Baptist. It was not strictly speaking an orphanage, as many of the lads had at least one parent living, but they were usually in dire circumstances, and the home gave them stability. Many of the Old Boys were now serving in the armed forces, while the current residents were making little jigsaw puzzles to send to PoWs and the wounded.

A Short Notice of St Augustine’s Home for Boys, Clewer, December 1917

Roll of Honour, 1917
On Active Service

Robert Annesley
Reginald Barber
Frank Berriman
Arthur Booker
Leonard Borman
John Brown
Frank Bungard
William Carter
Percy Cattle
Robert Chippington
George Collyer
Tom Corbett
Jack Corbett
Herbert Cousins
Thomas Cox
Francis Dawes
Charles Douglas
Wilfrid Eccles
Jack Ettall
Edward Farmer
James Frame
James Farmer
Charles Fisher
Wallis Fogg
George Finlay
George Gale
Stanley Graham
Robert Gosling
John Green
John Harrison
George Houston
Ernest Howells
Fred Hunt
Albert Hudson
Arthur Hudson
William Hobart
Albert Jarman
Reginald Jarman
Joseph Kelly
Edward Lewendon
Harry Macdonald
Eric Matthews
Harry Mott
Norman Neild
Alfred Newsome
Robert Parnell
Samuel Perry
Bennie Payne
William Potter
Charles Price
George Pitt
William Robert
Claude Roebuck
Alan Sim
George Simister
Thomas Small
William Smith
Thomas Squibb
Alfred Stroud
George Tate
Graham Taylor
Albert Turnham
Jack Ware
William White
Albert Wicks
Leonard Wicks
William Wicks
Harry Wilden
Edwin Williams
Albert Worth
Leslie Worters
Fred Wright
Seldon Williams


At Rest

Walter Bungard
Albert Braithwaite
Harry Clarke
Joseph Eaves
Russell Evans
Ernest Halford
Frank Lewis
Douglas Matthews
James Matthews
Harry Pardoe
Arthur Smith
Maurice Steer
Thomas Tuckwell
Harry Worsley
RIP

..
A Home for Boys has a special claim on the interest of all at this time, when so many are being left orphans as a result of the war, or who are temporarily without a father’s care and discipline, and letters come very frequently containing requests for information as to the admission and maintenance of boys at St Augustine’s….

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“If you feel satisfied, in all probability one has had too much”

Warfield churchgoers were encouraged to use Lent as a starting point for a restricted diet in the face of shortages.

VICAR’S LETTER.

MY DEAR FRIENDS AND PARISHIONERS,

I have been asked by the Secretary of the Ministry of Food to bring before my parishioners the imperative necessity of observing voluntarily the spirit and letter of Lord Devonport’s appeal. I urged this at the Morning and Evening Service last Sunday.

As loyal citizens you have been asked to save the country the enormous expense of using compulsion, which means the diversion of labour that could be more profitably employed in other directions. The Church during this season of Lent is calling us to self-control; some have always made a rule of restricting their diet in obedience to the laws of the Church on certain days and will not feel this restriction of food as other people may. We have to leave the table feeling unsatisfied, but that is an excellent thing to do. If you feel satisfied, in all probability one has had too much.

What a great thing it would be if England could accommodate herself to the present circumstances from loyalty rather than under compulsion. It is no excuse for anyone to excuse their excess because others exceed. If one man is a thief and robs his neighbour’s food, it does not make it right for others to do the like. Let us all try from our duty to God as well as our duty to our fellow man to keep under our bodies and bring them into subjection.

Yours faithfully in Christ,

WALTER THACKERAY.

* * *

As a result of a preliminary meeting in Bracknell on the subject of War Savings, a branch has been started in Warfield with its headquarters at the School. Mr. Brockbank is Hon. Secretary and Miss Leach Hon. Treasurer. It has already been doing good business. We wish to thank Lady Finlay for her encouragement of the children by giving eightpence towards the sum of 14/- saved.

Warfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, March 1917 (D/P151/28A./9/3

War savings open to all

The Warfield CE School launched a war savings association.

6th February 1917

Today we are busy starting a Warfield war savings association. Letters are being sent to each house in the parish as follows.

We are forming a war savings association at the school and it is open to everybody.

The rules are as follows.

1. You can pay 6d or more each week.

2. When you have paid 15/6 you will receive a £1 certificate.

3. If you withdraw your money in one year you get 15/9 in two years 16/9 in three years 17/9 in four years 18/9 in five years 20/-

4. You can withdraw your money at any time. If unable to pay your 6d any week you can make it up another time.

5. The scholars will gladly bring your contributions and your card to me and I will act as secretary.

Lessons have been carefully given to all the scholars and we look forward to a successful association.

The vicar (the Rev. Thackeray) will be chairman. Miss Leach treasurer. Lady Finlay and Mr and Mrs Crailsham and Mrs Thackeray will be the committee.

Walter Brockbank – secretary.

Warfield CE School log book (C/EL26/3, p. 361)

St Mark’s in Venice targetted by bombs

Cambridge don John Maxwell Image wrote to a friend abroad with thoughts on national politics. The new Lord Chancellor he disliked was Stanley Buckmaster. His Conservative rival Lord Finlay was eventually to succeed him in the post. Image also admired Lord Stanhope, another Conservative peer.

TCC [Trinity College, Cambridge]
Thursday 10 June ‘15

My Very Dear Old Man

Yours of June 4 reached me at breakfast this morning – not a very sumptuous breakfast – a plate of Quaker Oats (loathsome, because sugar verboten) and a cup of tea…

All your letters come “Opened by Censor”. One don’t know what to write. I hope he’ll pass this remark: that of all the recent Cabinet Shuffles the nastiest is perhaps the Lord Chancellorship to that short-tempered overbearing late tenant of the Censor’s chair. Even “good” Radicals (are there any such?) had expected Finlay: but it is the swagger post for screw, and the stainless patriots refused to let it go out of the party…

A message dropped from an aeroplane promises an air-raid of Zeppelins on C[ambridge] tonight. So universally is it credited that there will be disappointment if it does not come off! In all corners of Trinity College and other Colleges and the Union stand zinc pails filled with sand: and hydrants are ready for the protection of public buildings. You saw of course that in the attack on Venice last Tuesday a bomb was deliberately aimed at St Mark’s. They say the horses have been removed.

Earl Stanhope in the Lords yesterday was the finest and straightest speech yet on the Shell question, and on the Gas. He came from the Front on Saturday and goes back today.

God bless you both.

Yours affect.
Bild

Letter from John Maxwell Image, Cambridge don, to W F Smith (D/EX801/1)

This war and its terrible stress forces men to face reality

The vicar of Winkfield noted that some churches were full under the stresses of war – which he expected to last at least another year.

VICAR’S LETTER.

MY DEAR FRIENDS,

Soon after you get the February Magazine Lent, which falls very early this year, will have begun with its call to thoughtfulness and self-examination. And surely this War Year, the solemn Lenten Season will more than ever have its special message for all, and will be a “Call to Worship” to many who have neglected its opportunities in the past.

Our Nonconformist brethren have for some time been organising a “come to Church” campaign, and in most places attendance at public worship has largely increased, because this war with all its terrible stress and anxiety and forces men to face realities and is teaching us to look at the higher issues of life. May we then try to learn the lessons God would teach us by this trial and resolve to make a better use than ever before of this coming Lent; use to the full all the opportunities of public worship and make it a time of specially earnest private prayer for our brave Sailors and Soldiers, our Parish and our Country.

The calls on us during this time war are great, but I hope we shall not allow our usual Lenten self-denial savings purses for the Waifs and Strays to suffer; and that many will apply to the parish clerk or to myself for these purses.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,

H. M. MAYNARD.

OUR ROLL OF HONOUR.- A new list, kindly written out by Mr. Empson, has been made up to date and placed in the Church porch; the list now contains 60 names the following having been recently added:-

Bert King, Reginald Knight, Godfrey Loyd, Vivian Loyd, J. Franklin, Frank Payne, Leonard Tipper, Edward Still, Claud Williams, John Williams.

RED CROSS SOCIETY. – Since the war began the following articles have been forwarded from the Winkfield Branch to the Berkshire Branch at Reading.
140 day shirts, 72 night shirts, 29 bed jackets, 77 pairs of socks, 14 helmets, 16 pairs of operation stockings, 44 belts, 136 bandages, 29 pairs of gloves, 20 pairs of mittens, 5 pairs of bed socks, 9 comforters, 37 cushions.

Up to January 1st the Berkshire Branch sent out 2630 shirts; socks, 2790 pairs; vests, 1688; comforters, 540; night shirts, 700; mittens, 530; bed socks, 650. Of these a large number has been received by the Berkshire Regiment.

A satisfactory feature has been the large number of articles made by the mothers at Mrs. Ferard’s working parties. The value of the articles amounts to £55. To this, kind contributions have been given by Mrs. Asher, Mr. H. P Elliott, Lady Finlay, Mrs. Wilder, Mrs. Hayes Sadler, Mrs. Blakiston, Mrs. Louise Holt, Mrs. Ferard, Miss Thackrah.

It is hoped that further contributions may be received, for the work must not stop. So far as can be seen the stress of war will last another year at least and will seriously affect all of us remaining in England. But we should make every effort not to neglect those who are fighting for the defence of our lives and homes.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, February 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/2)

Entertainments in Winkfield for war funds

Ladies in Winkfield raised money to help the war effort by putting on a series of concerts for their neighbours.

ENTERTAINMENTS FOR WAR FUNDS.

Miss Graham Loyd repeated her excellent entertainment on Tuesday, December 29th, and a large audience enjoyed the programme provided.

Miss Loyd contributed two capital songs. Comic songs by Major Egerton and Messrs Green, Company and Woollatt were much appreciated, as was the song contributed by Mr. Worsfold, and those by Colour-Sergeant Brett, who received vociferous encores. The dialogue in costume, “Geese,” by Mrs And Miss Loyd, was excellently rendered and evoked well merited applause.

Miss Montgomerie is much to be congratulated on the success of the entertainment organised by her in the Parish Room on January 19th and repeated on the 22nd, on both occasions to a crowded house.

The first part was the play, “Hansel and Gretal,” which was prettily staged and excellently acted by Master L Guinness, the Misses M and T Guinness, Miss Viva Montgomerie, Miss Violet Sandford, Miss Camilla Finlay, Miss Frances Osman, the Misses F and A Wilder, and Miss Jean Baikie.

The children threw themselves thoroughly into their parts, and the acting of Master L Guinness as Hansel, Miss M Guinness as Gretal, and Miss T Guinness as the Witch, was especially praiseworthy. Mrs Guinness went to great trouble and expense in arranging the stage and scenery, and her efforts contributed largely to the success of the play.

The second part of the entertainment consisted of a Lantern Lecture by Miss Hunter who gave a most interesting account of her travels in far off lands, illustrated by a large number of splendid slides from photographs that had been taken on the spot. The net proceeds amounted to £7 18s. 3d.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, February 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/2)