In a prisoners’ hospital in Germany

Some PoWs were in a bad state.

We are glad to welcome home John Tidy, Richard Taylor and Percy Huxford, who have been prisoners of war, and to hear that Arthur Francis and Ben Ferns have arrived in England, though they are at present in hospital. Mrs. Ednie has heard that her son Victor is in a prisoners’ hospital in Germany, but he is expected to be moved home soon.

Winkfield District Magazine, January 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11)

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At home awaiting discharge after severe wounds

There was news of Ascot men.

Since our last issue news has been received that both Victor Ednie and Arthur Francis are prisoners and unwounded, while Percy Mortimer has been reported missing, and Ernest Collet severely wounded. Fred Talbot is at home awaiting discharge after his severe wounds.

Congratulations to J. Ferns on his promotion to a Commission in the Royal Navy.

Ascot section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, September 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/8)

“These Indians are splendid fellows, and such fighters”

A wounded soldier from Ascot had words of praise for the Gurkhas and Indian soldiers he was serving with, while two Bracknell men had been killed.

Ascot

THE WAR.

Two of our Ascot lads, Eric Ferns and Sidney Sumner, are amongst the wounded, of Sidney Sumner we shall have more to say in our April Number. The following extracts from a letter of Eric Ferns will be read with interest:-

“I have been very queer for a month now after my smash up. It was on December 9th. I was taking a car full of Gurkhas on to the field, and there came a German aeroplane, and dropped a bomb, and it missed my car, and a crowd of people gathered round to see if we were hit: and the same aeroplane dropped another bomb and took the back of my car off, and pitched me yards into a ditch. I don’t remember any more until I woke up, and found myself in Hospital. That was on the following Tuesday. I got 3 in me, one in the foot, one in the leg, and the other in the wrist: but the shock was dreadful. My foot and leg are much better: but my wrist is still bad, but I have much to be thankful for, as they told me 24 were killed and 4 injured by the same bomb…

These Indians are splendid fellows, and such fighters, they think of nothing else but this war. It is all rain, and up to your knees in mud…”

Bracknell

THE ROLL OF HONOUR

At the end of January news came that two more of those who are on our list on the Church door and fallen in the war.

WILLIAM KING GEORGE was the eldest son of Mr. S. King George of the Brackens. He was serving as Captain in the 3rd Gloucesters, and was killed at La Bassée on 25th January. His Colonel wrote of him, “We feel that we have lost a most gallant comrade and a true friend.” Captain George was married and leaves two sons.

GEORGE BRANT, who fell about the same time, was called up as a Reservist at the beginning of the war. He was a Private in the Queen’s West Surrey Regiment. His parents now live in Martin’s Lane, and were formerly living at Chavey Down. Brant was a widower and leaves two children.

Winkfield District Magazine, March 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/3)

A fine response from Ascot

The Ascot parish magazine shows how that village was adapting to war conditions. Some of the entries are typical of other parishes; more unusual is the use of Ascot Racecourse for a hospital, and the encouragement of the working classes to take responsibility for care of refugees.

THE WAR.
No less than 95 names of parishioners, or men connected with the parish, are mentioned in All Saints Church at the Special Service of Intercession on Wednesdays at 8 p.m. All these have, in some capacity or other, joined the Navy, or Army. It is a fine response, on the part of Ascot, to the call of the Country upon her sons to take up arms in her defence, and in the great struggle for justice and righteousness. May GOD watch over all our lads, and keep them from harm, both moral and bodily.

THOSE AT THE FRONT.- The names of those at the front are mentioned at the Holy Eucharist on Sundays and Thursdays ay 8 a.m. : also at Matins and Evensong on Sundays. We ask the help of our people to ensure an accurate list, for it would grieve us to leave nay names out. A box, with pencil and paper, is placed on the table at the west end of the Church for the reception of the full names (of those at the Front).These names shall be inserted in the Parish Magazine month by month. We append the first list, which we trust is complete as far as it goes –

NAVY. – Eric Welman, Herbert Edward Cook, Archibald James Ewart, John Nobbs, William Luke Havell, Frederick George Barton, Oliver Frank Tindall, William Percy Siggins, Joseph Wilfred Ferns, Thomas William Hawthorn, Herbert William Wilderspin, George Parker, Albert Arthur Barton.

ARMY.- Eric Harold Tottie, Herbert Lane Poole, Reginald Poole, Vernon Charles, Tapscott Cole, Maurice Wingfield.

RED CROSS HOSPITAL, &c.

We extract the following from the Windsor Express –

Mention has already been made in these columns of the valuable uses to which the racecourse buildings and enclosures at Ascot are now being put. The five-shilling stand, as previously announced, has been arranged in wards for the accommodation of wounded soldiers, and to make things as comfortable as possible, a heating apparatus costing between £400 and £500 is being installed.
But this is not all. Series after series of ambulance lectures have been given here by Dr. Gordon Paterson to prepare men and women for the duty of attending to the sick and wounded, while the grounds adjoining have been occupied considerably by special constables and others at drill – this being another kind of preparation of which the importance cannot be overlooked.

The latest development is that every suitable building is to become a dwelling for wives and children of soldiers at the front. It means that these families will leave barracks, thus making room for recruits, and will come to comfortable quarters at Ascot, where everything will be provided – furniture, firing, light, etc. – but food, and the latter they will provide for themselves from their separate allowances. The number of those who will swell Ascot’s normal population is at present unknown, but it is expected that full advantage will be taken of the preparations now in progress.

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