A Xmas collection for the soldiers blinded in the war

With the war over, families which had fled London for fear of raids were hapy to return home.

10th December 1918

Most of the London children returned to town during the Xmas holidays…

The teachers and children again made a Xmas collection for the soldiers blinded in the war, & the sum of £5 was sent to St Dunstan’s.

Log book of King Street School, Maidenhead (C/EL77/1, p. 431)

An Essay Competition on National Kitchens

Sunninghill
11th October 1918

During the past week an Essay Competition on National Kitchens was held, the prize being a War Savings Certificate offered by Miss Gibbons, Hon. Sec. of the National Kitchen here. 68 essays were sent in & were judged by Lady Askwith, who awarded the prize to Valentine Hullway – Stand. VI. She reported that the Essays reached a very high level, & as a consequence she gave 5/- in War Savings Stamps to the 2nd competitor, as did also Miss Gibbons to the next; the same lady also gave 2/6 to another competitor + Mrs Gibbons gave a like sum to still another.

Log book of Sunninghill: St Michael’s CE Mixed School (88/SCH/32/3, p. 232)

May God grant us this perfect peace before 1919

Teenager Joan Daniels, whose family had been evacuated from London to Reading, was optimistic about the war ending, as we come to the end of her diary.

August 19th 1918

I have now written in this book for over three months and this page completes the first book. Let us hope that by the time that I finish my next book I shall be writing at home & we shall have the blessing of peace …

May God grant us this perfect peace before 1919. Reading itself is not a nice town but the surrounding country is really beautiful & we have had some glorious times.

Diary of Joan Evelyn Daniels of Reading (D/EX1341/1)

Here chiefly on account of the Air Raids

Families fleeing London for the safety of Reading were affecting school performance.

25th March 1918

The Vicar visited the school this afternoon. The end of the school year. The work of the various classes is good, though many children have been admitted (especially in Class I) who were very backward for their age. But as their parents had come here chiefly on account of the Air Raids – room was made in this school for them.


Reading: All Saints Infant School log book (89/SCH/19/2, p. 239)

No seating room

The influx of families fleeing air raids in London had reached the point at which BerKshire schools couldn’t cope any more:

18th March 1918
Four children from London sought admission this morning. As we cannot find seating room for the children in attendance, Mistress decided that these children must wait until after Easter, as there will then be a little more room when Standard I has been transferred to Gordon Rd. School.

Log book of King Street School, Maidenhead (C/EL77/1, p. 417)

“It is most difficult to obtain respectable lodgings in Reading”

Housing in Reading was in very short supply by this stage of the war. Applying for extra lodging allowance for warder Edward Hubbard, the governor wrote to the Commissioners:

It is most difficult to obtain respectable lodgings in Reading, owing to work and also the influx of people from London on account of the raids. People have their names down for many months to obtain a house.

25.12.17

Reading Prison [Place of Internment] letter book (P/RP1/8/2/1)

Evacuee families go home

The fear of air raids was beginning to subside.

16th November 1917

Several families are now leaving the town who came to Reading a short time ago to get away from the air-raid area; many children’s names are, in consequence, being removed from the registers, after being on them, for a few weeks.

Reading: Battle Infants School log book (SCH20/8/2, p. 306)

Safe in Sunninghill

More families had fled the danger of air raids.

5th October 1917

I have this week admitted 7 children who have come to live here from London on account of the Air Raids.

Sunninghill: St Michael’s CE Mixed School log book (88/SCH/32/3, p. 218)

In a nervous state due to air raids

Air raids were traumatic for children, prompting some families to move out of targetted areas.

King Street School, Maidenhead
10th September 1917

Twelve children have been admitted from raid areas in London & elsewhere & in most cases parents stated children were in a nervous state or asked for special care & treatment while at school.

Abingdon Girls CE School
1917, 10th to 14th September

Ten girls came too late to be marked on Monday afternoon. They had been to see an aeroplane which had come down in a field near Culham.

Wallingford Boys Council School
1917, 10 September

Re-assembled after 5 weeks’ holiday. Commenced collection of Horse-Chestnuts for Ministry of Munitions of War.

Log books of King Street School, Maidenhead (C/EL77/1, pp. 399-400); Abingdon Girls CE School (C/EL 2/2, p. 147); Wallingford Boys Council School log book (SCH22/8/3, p. 63)

Temporary residents

A head teacher in Cookham was disinclined to take in evacuee children staying in Maidenhead.

Cookham Alwyn Road School
September 7th 1917

I am constantly receiving applications for admission of [Maidenhead] borough children, mostly temporary residents, but as I am very closely approaching maximum on roll, I am refusing to admit these borough children, and am sending them on to the borough school.

Cookham Alwyn Road School log book (88/SCH/18/1, p. 302)

People coming away from air raid districts

A Reading woman who was hoping to find a tenant for a house she had inherited saw a silver lining in the war.

83 Hamilton Road
Reading
July 19/17
Dear Mr Sargeant

They tell me houses are letting in Reading, people coming away from Raid districts…

Yours sincerely

Agnes Allen

Letter from Miss Agnes Allen to her lawyer (D/EX208/B2/17/70)

More children sent to Clewer

More children were evacuated to Clewer from a home run by the Community of St John Baptist in air-raid threatened east London.

11 September 1915
Twelve more children were sent from Leytonstone to St John’s Home.

CSJB Annals (D/EX1675/1/14/5)