We do not forget

The Bishop congratulated the Revd T Guy Rogers, the Reading vicar turned army chaplain, on being awarded a medal for bravery.

THE BISHOP’S MESSAGE

The following extracts are from the Bishop’s message in the November Diocesan Magazine:

Your prayers are asked especially
For the good hand of God upon us in the war.
For our allies and especially for Roumania [sic].
For the National Mission…

Your thanksgivings are asked…
For the liberation of the Missionaries in German East Africa.

THE DIFFICULTY ABOUT EVENING SERVICES

I most heartily trust that neither in town parishes nor in country parishes will the evening service on Sundays be abandoned without a very strong effort to carry it on under conditions of lighting which the police can sanction…

THE DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE FOR PURPOSES OF BANNS

I wish to call attention again to the ruling under which I act, given by my Chancellor… to the effect that a person’s normal home where he or she is known may be reckoned as place of residence, though the person in question is at the moment absent whether on military service or for some other purpose.

We are all delighted to know that Mr Guy Rogers has been given the Military Cross. We do not forget him.

COMFORTS FOR THE TROOPS

I have received a letter from the Director General of Voluntary Organisations expressing great anxiety as to the sufficient supply of comforts for the troops, such as mittens, mufflers, helmets and socks, especially the three first. I am asked to ‘secure the co-operation of the clergy’ in my dioceses to make the anxiety known. The following are depots of the V.O.A. in this diocese…

Berkshire: W. C. Blandy, esq, 1 Friar Street, Reading…
Reading: D. Haslam, jun., esq, 16 Duke Street, Reading…

C. OXON

LIST OF MEN SERVING IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES

The following additional names have been added to our prayer list:

William Monger, George Slaughter, William Hewett, Harold Hales, Cecil Hales, William Brown, Albert Bishop, George O’Dell, Frederick Eady, Herbert Ballard, Alfred Clibbon, George Breakspear, Albert Gray, Harry Rixon, Walter Rosser, Rupert Wigmore, William Butler, Walter Drown, Percy Prater.

In addition to those already mentioned we especially commend the following to your prayers:

Killed: Percy Wyer, Walter May, Ernest Bishop.
Sick: Edward Iles, Charles Webb, William Wright.
Wounded: William Holmes, Frank, Fowler, Harry Merry, Arthur Morrice, Leonard Strong.
Wounded and Missing: Frank Snellgrove.
Missing: Edward Taylor.

CONCERT IN ST PETER’S HALL

On Wednesday, November 29th, there will be a concert in St Peter’s Hall to help provide funds for giving a Christmas Dinner and Entertainment to a party of Wounded Soldiers. Mr E. Love and party are working up an excellent programme, and we hope our readers will help to make the concert a great success by supporting it as much as they can.

Earley parish magazine, November 1916 (D/P191/28A/23/11)

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Very fortunate to be able to go to the front

The vicar of Reading St Giles said he envied his fellow Reading clergyman T Guy Rogers, who had signed up as an Army chaplain. Incidentally, you may recognise one of the names on the wounded list – the heroic Fred Potts.

Notes from the Vicar

The following names should be added to those on our Intercession list:

Henry Charles Pyke, A.P.C.; F. Mathews, 5th Worcestershire Regt; France Scott Stokes, “H.M.S. Alastia”; Francis Lancelot Temple Friend, Canadian Contingent; Waller William Horlock, “H.M.S. Chatham”; J.C. Englefield, 21st R. Fusiliers; J. Gooding, 14th Glousters; S.J. Curtis, Inns of Court O.T.C.; F. Turner 6th North Staffords; Private Dwyer, 10th Warwicks

Wounded G. Brown, Sherwood Foresters; Trooper F. Potts and Trooper R. West

Missing – R. Ayers, Berks Yeomanry

TO THE LIST OF THE FALLEN
Percy Hamilton, Rifle Brigade; Norman Eady and Charles Butler, Berks Yeomanry ; Alan McKinley, Australian Field Artillery ; Horace Percival Cadman, R.W. Fusiliers. The Yeomanry and our 1/4th Batt. Royal Berkshire Reg. and the 7th and 8th Batt. are very much in are thoughts and prayers.

I am sure we shall not fail to remember in our prayers the Rev.T. Rogers who is resigning the living of S. John’s and going out within the next 2 weeks as Chaplain to the troops in France. He has realized the call and made the sacrifice. S. John’s will greatly miss him and so will the town of Reading where he has done great and useful work. Personally I will miss him, we have worked together in many ways (e.g. the Convention) and although we differed strongly on some point, yet we remained great friends, and I shall not easily forget very and happy (and very solemn) hours spent together.
He is very fortunate to be able to go to the front. God bless him in his work.

Reading St Giles parish magazine, October 1915 (D/P96/28A/32)

“Mother, mother, save me”

William Hallam relates a spooky story about a fallen soldier from Wantage, while Florence Vansittart Neale has more spy rumours.

William Hallam, 14th September 1915
Mrs Hallam came down from Wantage. She told us a strange thing. Young Bobby Lovegrove was killed in the Dardanelles the other Sunday. His mother was in Wantage Church and was seen to look ill and get up and leave the church, and when her friends asked her what was the matter she said she had heard her boy’s voice say quite distinctly – “Mother, Mother, save me”. This happened the same Sunday he was killed before she knew even he was in Gallipoli. Young Eady too was killed the same time.

Florence Vansittart Neale, 14 September 1915
Heard 2 submarines (Germans) sunk in Bristol Channel & one beached. Shaw also saw one being chased near Lundy, & was caught.

Hear submarine catch nets made at Appledore.

Hear now they have guns at Woolwich which can go 10 miles. Also that the man [who was?] head of our aeroplanes is a spy! All changed now!!!

Diaries of William Hallam (D/EX1415/24) and Florence Vansittart Neale (D/EX73/3/17/8)

Billetted in a lousy rat-infested hole

William Hallam was shocked to hear from family members how Lockinge and Wantage were billetting soldiers. It might perhaps have been fair preparation for the trenches, but it shows that not everyone was responding to the war with a generous spirit.

A bitterly cold east wind enough to shave any one as the saying is. I got up at ¼ past 8 and by time we had got breakfast and I had done my work it was too late for church. So we lit a fire, and George and I sat talking, in the front room till 1 then we went up to Old Town station and met my bro & wife and we did not have dinner till nearly 2. None of us went out, it was so cold. So we made up a good fire in the sitting room and sat there talking – hearing all the gossip of Lockinge & Wantage and all about the soldiers who had been billeted in Lockinge mostly the H.A.Co. [Honorable Artillery Company] from London, and the Dorset Yeomanry. These soldiers were put in the old tithe barn at Betterton, up at the Bothy, in Kitford Hotel, the golf pavilion, as well as the people’s cottages. The headquarters were in the Rectory. Old Eady as usual acted like a pig, and instead of letting the soldiers be quartered in the clean and warm farm buildings at his house – the Manor Farm, he made the officers take them up to that lousey [sic], rat infested hole at Chalkhill by the Hine Kiln, and down at Goddard barn and in that old Malthouse at East Lockinge.

Diary of William Hallam (D/EX1415/22)