Binding up the wounded in No-man’s-land

A Reading soldier reports on the act of heroism which won his former vicar a medal.

EXTRACTS FROM LETTER TO THE VICAR THANKING FOR THE PARISH MAGAZINE, FROM MEN ON SERVICE.

By the way I saw the Rev. T. Guy Rogers winning his honour, in fact I saw him in the trenches and No-mans-land binding up the wounded, with our Chaplain, who also won a Military Cross. The Rev. T. Guy Rogers preached the Sermon at the Church Service held on the evening before we went into action at the time when our Brigade captured the village of Lesboeufs on the 25th. I was talking to him and our Chaplain in the third German line and they asked me where most of the wounded lay in support with a gun team and they went forward. Soon afterwards we had orders to move forward and hold ground won and I saw them busy binding the wounded. It was one of the days I shall never forget.

W. HOLLOWAY.

I was at the Dardanelles through the main operation and our ship did some very good work in landing troops &c. I had the misfortune to see the Italian ship ‘Leonardo da Vinci’ blown up. It was a terrible sight and it made us quite nervy for a week or so . But I am proud to say that our ships did all that was possible in the work of rescue.

L.O. STAGG, A.B.

CARE AND COMFORTS

The following have been sent from the Working Party: 5 pillow slips, 6 shirts, 30 locker cloths, 35 limb bandages, 18 bags; total, with those already acknowledged, 1,940.

Donations have been received as follows:

Senior members of St John’s and St Stephen’s Choir, balance of Outing Fund £3.17.11

Miss K C Lovejoy £1

Anon 10s

Mrs Dimbleby 5s

Reading St. John parish magazine, February 1917 (D/P172/28A/24)

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Splendid work for wounded soldiers

The women and girls of Reading St John continued to be active in supporting soldiers and sailors.

GIRLS’ CLUB COMPETITIONS…

The result of the Competitions is all the more gratifying as S. John’s Girls have been doing work in other directions all the winter; at Christmas time they sent out 20 hampers to some of our poorest neighbours, and 70 toys either made or mended. They have also made and sent to members of our Army and Navy, 3 nightshirts, 7 waist-coats, 12 pairs of long sailors’ stockings, 36 helmets, 17 pairs of socks, 16 scarves, 57 pairs of mittens. Mrs. Stuart Rickman or Arborfield Grange kindly provided all the wool for articles sent to the Navy, and another friend the wool for those sent to the Army. As many of the girls are continuing this work during the summer, there will soon be a further list of articles to the credit of the club.

CARE AND COMFORTS COMMITTEE.

Our Working Party for providing comforts for the wounded soldiers is doing splendid work. We are now in direct touch with the Military Hospital, and can be assured that we are working on the articles most needed at the moment., as Miss Homan has been appointed a member of the Sub-Committee which deals with this branch of the work. The following is the list of further subscriptions towards our fund for the purchase of materials.

Amount already acknowledged, £6. 0s. 6d; Anonymous, £1; St John’s Day Schools, 10/-; Miss Bell, 10/-; Mrs Dimbleby, 5/-; Mr John Eighteen, £2 2s 0d; Miss Hewitt, 2/6; Miss Green, 10/-; Mrs and Miss Cray, 3/-; Mrs Dauncey, 10/-; Mrs Arnold, 10/-; Miss B. Venner, 2/6; Nurse Bath, 2/6; The Misses Turquand, 10/-; Mrs Meaden, 10/-; Mrs Harrison Jones, 10/-; Miss Harrison Jones, 10/-; Mrs Beare, 5/-; Anonymous, 10/-; Mr Herbert Kingham, £1 1s 0d. Total £16 4s 0d. The £3 acknowledged last month as from Messrs Sutton should have read the Misses Sutton.

The following is the list of articles sent to the Red Cross Depot from our Working Party up to date:

hot water bottle bags, 38; locker cloths, 78; brush bags, 78; many-tailed bandages, 26; oddment bags, 21; anaesthetic pads, 34; pairs slippers, 45; pairs socks, 10; coloured pillow covers, 29; feather pillows, 3; nightshirts, 3; operating coat, 1; face cloths, 25; old linen. Total, 391.

EASTER CARDS

Replies have … been received from the following at the front: S. Pottinger, Albert Stevens, H. W. Fisher, G. King.

Reading St John parish magazine, June 1915 (D/P172/28A/23)

Don’t desert church workers in Canada and Australia during the war

We see here the concern of Reading churchgoers that Australian and Canadian citizens should not feel abandoned by British concentration on the war effort. The Colonial and Continental Church Society provided ministers for Anglican congregations in the remoter reaches of the British Empire – often teenagers and young men in their 20s from working class backgrounds who had enthusiasm and commitment but often lacked the formal education to seek ordination as clergymen. The Society’s secretary in the early years of the war, who was responsible for selecting these men, was, incidentally, the Revd Frank Dickinson, nephew of Henry Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey.

Colonial and Continental Church Society Drawing Room Sale

Mrs. Dimbleby, the new Hon. Secretary of our Ladies’ Auxiliary, has very kindly offered to continue the Drawing Room Sale, held originally by Miss Green, and subsequently by Mrs. Wilson. The Sale will be held at Craven Road on Wednesday and Thursday afternoons, October 14th and 15th. It will be readily understood that the spiritual needs of far-off Prairie settlers do not cease during the war. The brave clergy working in the Australian bush and in the remote regions of Yukon and Athabasca must not be allowed to feel that the Empire has deserted them.

Reading St John parish magazine, October 1914 (D/P172/28A/23, p. 2)