The life of a father or husband, or brother or son – perhaps yours – may depend on what you collect

Wokingham people were urged to save fruit stones.

Fruit Stones & Nut Shells are urgently needed. Converted into charcoal, they apparently possess special properties which are necessary in the manufacture of gas helmets. Ample stocks will be available in the future, but at the moment the need is most urgent. Will all therefore who read this set aside fruit stones and nut shells (don’t let them get mouldy) and the ‘Wolf Cubs’ will collect them. Don’t be afraid that you haven’t got enough to be any good – every little helps, and the life of a father or husband, or brother or son – perhaps yours – may depend on what you collect.

Wokingham St Sebastian parish magazine, August 1918 (D/P154C/28A/1)

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Both scout and cadet training should form part of the ordinary curriculum

Berkshire teenagers, whether they were still at school or had left to start work at 14, were encouraged to undertake semi-military training in cadet corps.

The following letters have been referred to us for consideration, viz:

9/3/18, from the Secretary of the County Territorial Association to the Secretary of the Berks Education Committee.
23/3/18, from General Sir R Scallon (Director General’s Department, War Office) to the said Association.
2/4/18, from General Sir H Sclater (GOC in C Southern Command) to the same.

The general effect of these letters is as follows, viz: The
Education Committee are specifically asked:

To give official recognition to the Cadet Companies already raised in the County Boys’ Schools of Windsor and Maidenhead, both of which units are recognised by the War Office and are affiliated to the 4th Royal Berks Regiment.

(Note – It is to be noted that the only other cadet units so recognised by the War Office as operating in the county are The Douai Cadet Company, affiliated to the 4th Royal Berks, and the 2nd and 4th Oxford Cadet CLB Battalions, both affiliated to the KRR. The Reading Cadet Company, affiliated to the 4th Royal Berks, is also mentioned as recognised, but this unit draws its recruits from the Borough rather than the County area.)

To urge upon other school masters the importance of raising cadet companies “in the schools throughout the County”.

It is, further, strongly recommended that a Committee should be formed in the County (Sir Robert Scallon suggesting that the Education Committee should undertake the formation of it) with a view to the development of the cadet movement. This Committee would be composed of the Director of Education (i.e. the Education Secretary), of leading gentlemen in the County who are interested in the movement, of employers of boy labour, of the secretary and representative of the Territorial Association, and of representatives of the volunteers and of labour interests. The functions of the Committee would be the encouragement and co-ordination of cadet corps, boy scouts, wolf cubs, and similar organisations, and would also have regard to boys outside any existing organisation. The Committee would not interfere with existing units. Sir H Sclater remarks that a Committee of this kind has been formed for Worcestershire and that it is doing excellent work.

It is pointed out that “the cadet movement is not a military one”, the aim being “the improvement both in character and physique of the boys”. Organised games should form a large part of the training.
Boys, it is considered by the War Office, should be encouraged to be scouts until aged 14 or 15; they should be cadets until 17, when “they might join Section C or the Volunteers if they are so willing”. Scouts wishing to be cadets need not cease to be scouts.
With regard to secondary schools, the writers suggest that both scout and cadet training should form part of the ordinary curriculum; also that school units should as a rule be grouped together, and not form part of either an adult unit nor of a cadet corps composed of boys who have ceased to attend school.
Corps composed of several school units should come together for the yearly Battalion camp, and be under the command of a suitably qualified man, whether a military officer or not.

We are not clear what “official recognition” of existing cadet companies would imply, or what expenditure by the Local Authority would be involved, or how far this could be legally incurred. Moreover, we are disposed to think that any recognition afforded to cadets should be available for scouts…

The Local Education Authority have no authority over secondary schools not maintained by them. Of boys’ schools so maintained, Wallingford School is the only one without a cadet unit. We recommend that the question of the formation of a cadet company at that school be brought to the notice of the governors with a view to their favourable consideration.

We think that such a Committee as is suggested might do good spade-work locally… Whether the Education Committee should take the lead in this matter, or whether it should be left to the Territorial Association is a matter for consideration. On the whole, having regard to the facts that the cadet movement is definitely non-military and that the Local Education Authority is likely to have increasing opportunities of keeping in touch with the lads, the advantages of the former course seems to us to be greater. On the other hand, the work, if taken over by the Education Committee, must eventually throw greater burdens on a depleted and overworked staff, and the suggested constitution of the proposed committee hardly seems to secure to the Local Education Authority such a voice in the proceedings as would be necessary if public money, assigned for educational purposes, is to be expended.

Report of Cadet Training Sub-committee to Berkshire Education Committee, 27 April 1918 (C/CL/C1/1/21)

Trying to ‘do their bit’

Food shortages were encouraging people to take up growing heir own fruit and veg.

Food Production.

The Committee of the Crowthorne, S. Sebastian, Finchampstead and Sandhurst Horticultural Society has decided to hold a Fruit and Vegetable Show during the month of October, the idea being to encourage the cultivation of food to the greatest extent possible. For this same purpose the Wokingham Horticultural Society has just been formed and proposes to hold a Show on Sept. 25th.

In this connection the ‘Wolf Cubs’ are trying to ‘do their bit’ on a piece of ground kindly lent to them.

Will anyone send them along a few seeds, but more especially seed potatoes.

Wokingham St Sebastian parish magazine, March 1918 (D/P154C/28A/1)

The Christmas Dinner Table Collection for Belgian children

The Wokingham St Sebastian parish magazine issued an appeal to families to make a Christmas dinner collection for the benefit of children in wartorn Belgium.

December 1916
An Appeal is being made for Belgian children. An envelope will be left at every house. Will you pass it round at your Xmas dinner.

January 1917, p.49 “Belgian Children Relief Fund.- The Christmas Dinner Table Collection amounted to £12 5s. The distribution and collection of the envelopes in the Parish was undertaken and carried out by the ‘Wolf Cubs,’ and we are glad that their efforts were so successful.

Wokingham St Sebastian parish magazine, December 1916 and January 1917 (D/P154C/28A/1)