The children’s gift to the Serbian Relief Fund

Children who attended the Anglican Sunday School in Bracknell did get a Christmas party this year – but no entertainment other than a storyteller.

SUNDAY SCHOOL TEA.

This took place on January 4th, at the Victoria Hall. The tea seemed to be much enjoyed by the party of 220, who found the tables well supplied with cakes and bread and butter, arranged by the kind ladies who had undertaken to help. After tea crackers were handed round and caused much enjoyment. Then, while those helping were having their tea, Mr. Grant stood forth and told the children a capital fairy story which was listened to in quiet. A distribution of presents followed. In the classes of elder children, three or four in each class who had gained the highest number of marks received a small gift, while in the Infant classes each child was presented with a present.

The Vicar explained to the children that there was to be no entertainment, and the money that would otherwise have been spent on this was to be sent as the children’s gift to the Serbian Relief Fund. This announcement was received with applause. When “God Save the King” had been sung the children were dismissed, and as they left the Hall each child received an orange and some sweets, the kind gift of Mr. Western.

Bracknell section of the Winkfield District Magazine, February 1916 D/P151/28A/8/2

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A sumptuous tea

Wounded soldiers invited to tea at Trinity Church in Queen’s Road contributed to their own entertainment.

Wounded Soldiers Tea

On December 15th we had the pleasure of entertaining about 45 patients from Redlands War Hospital. By the kindness of the Tramways Manager, a special car was provided, which brought our guests to Trinity soon after two o’clock.

Various games – cards, bagatelle, dominoes, draughts, were indulged in with evident enjoyment until 4.15, when we all sat down to a sumptuous tea. Soon, a very festive appearance was presented, as crackers were pulled, and soldiers and lady-helpers alike donned the fanciful headgear.

After tea, songs were contributed by various friends, and two most interesting turns were provided by Private Fielding, A.S.C, who, accompanied on the piano by Private Barraclough, A.S.C., played first with bones, and then upon the rather unusual instruments – four wine glasses.

Flowers, magazines, and fruit were given to the men as they left, to give to those in hospital who were unable to be present.

Trinity Congregational Church, Reading: church magazine, February 1916 (D/EX1237/1/11)