Wounded soldiers will be fit subjects for these dreadful germ-carrying flies

The arrival of wounded soldiers to Reading gave a new impetus to the battle to fight contagious disease in the town.

SAVE THE WOUNDED

The Municipal Authorities have joined forces with the War Office in a great crusade, the object of which is the extermination of flies.
It is a matter of common knowledge that the house fly is a carrier of diseases, including the germs of consumption, typhoid fever, diphtheria and other infectious diseases.

A committee was recently formed to deal with this question which is a most serious one in view of the fact that there will be in Reading hundreds of wounded soldiers, who will be fit subjects for these dreadful germ-carrying flies.

It was decided that every house within a quarter-of-a-mile radius of each war hospital shall be regularly and systematically visited, and that fly traps shall be provided to each of these houses.

Many V.A.D. Nurses, District Visitors, and other ladies have already offered their services for this work, valuable not only on behalf of the soldiers but for the benefit of the health of the entire community.

This is a tremendous undertaking, as many thousands of houses will require to be visited, and the offers of help at present received are not nearly adequate to deal with the work.

There must be, many ladies, who would be glad to do any useful work on behalf of our soldiers, more especially for the wounded who have already risked life and limb for us as a nation.

As we in Caversham now have a Red Cross Hospital the work has to be taken up here.

The Hon. Secretary (Miss Innes, Health Department, Municipal Buildings, Reading), or Mrs. Cleaver, who has undertaken the work of Supervisor for Caversham, will be glad to receive offers of help, and to give particulars with regard to the duties of the voluntary inspectors.

A lecture will given on “Flies” at Balmore Hall, at 2.30, on Thursday, June 3rd, by Dr Stenhouse Williams, and it hoped that all who are able will be present.

Caversham parish magazine, June 1916 (D/P162/28A/7)

A geographical error

Lady Mary Glyn wrote to her son Ralph with her comments on the news. The Appam was a British civilian ship transporting some wounded soldiers and German prisoners of war, as well as civilians, from West Africa. Sir Edward Merewether (1858-1938) was the British Governor of Sierra Leone, and was also onboard. The ship was captured by a German vessel, and taken to neutral America.

My own darling Scrappits…

It is Monday Jan 31 [1916] …

I have been seeing people all day – no time to write or read – even the account of the Paris Zeppelin raid. Poor Sir Edward & Lady Merewether of Malta [dogs?] lost in this Appam tragedy. It is too sad. And Lady Wake’s brother Beau St Aubyn in the Persia – doing a good turn to Johnny Ward whose place it was to go. There seems to be little hope of his having been saved, though the man standing next to him at the time of the explosion was picked up. So the whole round world is full of tragedy – but the assurance is that the Germans cannot hold out much longer. Lettice has heard that there is most certain information as to the economic conditions being desperate & quotes Bishop Bury of N Europe….

Poor Mackenzie, stationmaster – has his son home desperately ill – consumption of the throat. He has not been to the front but serving with Kitchener’s Army & it has been too rough a life….

We began the evening with a Zeppelin excitement, One reported at Bourne – & then at Ryde near Thorney, & Peterborough was warned. Now, 11 pm , I hear the Zeppelin dropped a bomb at Stamford and one other place, & we shall hear more tomorrow, & I only hope it will not come back upon its track to right this way. I am conscious of most inadequate precautions! & worry myself to think how we could protect the children [Meg’s little Anne and Richard, who were visiting]. “The safest place is just where they are”, says T’Arch [possibly the Archbishop] & counsels no move to any quarters other than where they are, as we have no cellars.
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