“Our children will inherit a war eviller still”

John Maxwell Image’s latest letter to his old friend W F Smith saw hypocrisy among those advocating the growing of vegetables, while he and Florence heard that both Percy and Sydney had been wounded.

29 Barton Road
1 Sept. ‘18
My very dear ancient

We went to the Botanical Garden the other day, and found the great lawn stripped of grass, and from end to end now green with potatoes – that of course, one expected – but I boiled with wrath when great beds, which had been carefully set out with scientifically labelled specimens are now filled with kitchen vegetables – e.g. faded yellow beans rattling in their pods – for not a single one of them, either here or in other beds, had been picked. Woe unto you, S. and P., hypocrites – it is all shabby humbug. At least these might have been brought to utility. But for the publicity to myself, I would fain bring this scandal under the eye of the Local Food Controller, and give a dressing down to the paid Curator…

You object to RC “mummeries” and genuflexions which teach the men at the front to forget the inside of a church. What do you think of this, which I heard the other day from the Medical Officer of an Army Hospital at Cherryhinton? It had happened to the RC Padre only the day previously. A poor Anzac soldier was dying of his wounds, and in very low heart. The RC, who liked the man, was endeavouring to comfort him with the assurance that God is a Merciful God and will pardon the sinner who repents. “Ah, Sir”, said the dying man, “that is not my trouble. I know Him to be merciful: it’s the other chap I’m afraid of.” (The word used wasn’t “chap” but “b—“.)

To me it seems that our best, and only, chance, is for America to crush the High Command and Junkers while she is still hot on the business. If we cool down, the Hun, with our own Pacifists and Defeatists, will be too clever for us – and our children will inherit a war eviller still. It is horrible the slaughter and loss among the families known to us here. Not one seems to have escaped, wounds at least.

Florence has two brothers, Lieutenants in the Norfolks and the Civil Service Rifles respectively. When the push began, we had such a joyous letter from Percy at breakfast, and that same afternoon, as I was sitting in my study, a rap came at the door, and Ann’s voice: “Mistress has had a telegram. Mr Percy is wounded.” Very smart the WO was – “regret to inform you that … admitted 8 General Hospital Rouen August 9th. Gunshot wound left wrist and scalp severe.” Admitted Aug. 9: and news to us at Cambridge the very same day.
Then Sydney, the Norfolks, after fighting Thursday, Friday and Saturday – a shell landed exactly where he stood – with 6 of his men – only 1 of the 7 not killed or wounded.

You would imagine Florrie to be miserable. On the contrary, she is in brighter spirits than she had ever shewn during the English Advance. She feels that they are safe, for a short time – no anxiety: and I heard her giving joy, two days ago, to her Cook Ruth, who has just heard news of her brother being wounded and in hospital and therefore safe (poor Ann’s brother was killed).

We have had such charming letters from Colonels and Generals etc, re both boys, each of whom is a favourite in his Regiment. Sydney (whom his Colonel describes as always working “at Concert pitch”) will, I trust, soon be well enough to return. Poor Percy – they fear he will lose the use of his left hand.

Re the Greben. Admiral Troubridge (so I heard) had her nicely encircled, when suddenly came an Admiralty wire, ordering him to let her alone. He was recalled to England to explain his action – and produced this very telegram. They identified the room in the Admiralty from whence it came: but professed inability to identify the sender. Credit Judaeus Apella – Traitors in high places – who will never be dislodged. It is our own people we have to fear.

Kind love from us both to you both.

Ever yours
Bild

Letter from John Maxwell Image, Cambridge don, to W F Smith (D/EX801/2)

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News of Newbury men

More Newbury men joined the forces.

O.N’s in His Majesty’s Forces.
List No. 12.
Additional Names.

ALDERSON, Cadet C. B., R.A.F.
CHURCH, Pte. A. E., Artists’ Rifles.
GAUNTLETT, H., R.N.
GIBSON, Gunner J. M., R.G.A.
HURRELL, Cadet J.J. O.C.B
KENDRICK, 2nd A. M., P.A., R.N.A.S.
MICHELL, Lance-Corpl. C., Royal Warwick Regiment.
NEW, Cadet G. H., R.A.F.
NEWMAN, Gunner, 1/1st Wessex Heavy Battery.
PLUMB, T.
STRADLING, Cadet A. W. G., R.A.F.
SUMMERS, Cadet S., R.A.F.
WALTER, J.

Promotions.

BLAND, Cadet, W. H., to be 2nd Lieut., R.A.F.
CHURCH, 2nd Lieut. E. H., R.A.F., to be Lieutenant.
DAVIDSON, Corpl. I. C., Worcester Regiment, to be Sergeant.
HUDSON, 2nd Lieut. N. A., Leicester Regiment, to Lt. Adjt.
PARKER, Cadet G. L., to be Probationary 2nd Lieut., R.A.F.
PLENTY, Capt. E. P., R.A.F., to be Major.
ROBERTS, Pte. E. E., Civil Service Rifles, to be Lce.-Corpl.
ROSLING, Capt. D. W., The King’s Liverpool Regiment, to be Major.
TANNER, Cadet, W. J. V., to be 2nd Lieut., Royal Berkshire Regiment, attached Royal Warwick Regiment.
WEBB, Lieut. O. S., M.C., R.E., to be Captain.
YALDEN, Sergt. E. C., 7th Middlesex Regiment, to be 2nd Lieut., 7th Middlesex Regiment.

Honours.- Croix de Guerre.

BURGESS, Lieut. N .G., R.N.R.

Mentioned in Despatches.

ALLEE, Capt. J., A.S.C.
HALL, Lieut. G. W., R.G.A.

Reported Killed, Now Wounded and Prisoner of War.

MICHELL, Lnce.-Corpl. C., Royal Warwick Regiment

Wounded.

BROWN, Lieut. A. B. V., 3/17th London Regiment.
DAVIDSON, Sergt. I. C., Worcester Regiment.
FUNNELL, Pte. F., 10th Royal Fusiliers.
SANDBACH, Sergt. A. L., 2nd South African Horse.

Lost at Sea.

BURGESS, Lieut. N. G., Croix de Guerre, R.N.R.

Accidentally Killed.

COWELL-TOWNSHEND, Lieut. R., R.A.F.

Killed in Action.

HALLEN, Corpl. J V. 1st Surrey Rifles.
MORTIMER, Pte F. C., 4th North Staffordshire Regiment.

The Newburian (magazine of St Bartholomew’s School, Newbury), July 1918 (N/D161/1/8)

“There must be a certain satisfaction to know he died bravely for his King and Country”

There was sad news of several men from Sunninghill.

The Vicar’s Letter

Again I am sorry to have to record the death of two more Sunninghill men. Pte. H. F. Simmonds, who was missing for some weeks, must now be regarded as having been killed. His Commanding Officer writes to say that there can be but little doubt about it, as a shell fell between three men, one of whom was Pte. Simmonds. Our sincerest sympathy is given to Mr. and Mrs. Simmonds in their great bereavement. Pte. Simmonds was in the Civil Service Rifles.

Pte. Gilbert Norris, of the Australian Imperial Forces has also been killed. Though he has not been seen here for some time, he was a native of Sunninghill, and we ask his widow, relations, and friends to accept our condolences.

Corporal Dalton, I am glad to say, is progressing satisfactorily after having been wounded in the leg.

Cheapside News

The fortunes of our soldiers serving at the various Fronts are the chief subjects of interest in Cheapside, as elsewhere, at present.

Mrs. Beale received a letter from the Major of the Battalion in which her son William was serving at the time of his death. He wrote:

“He was a splendid man, and highly thought of by all who came in contact with him. Allow me to express to you my heartfelt sympathy, but at the same time there must be a certain satisfaction to know he died bravely for his King and Country.”

Cecil Godwin has been wounded and is in hospital, but reports himself able to walk about, so it is hoped that it is not serious.

Sunninghill parish magazine, September 1917 (D/P126/28A/1)