“We hope none have been forgotten”

Christmas presents were sent out again this year, with even wounded soldeiers helping to wrap them.

Warfield

CHRISTMAS PRESENT FUND FOR WARFIELD MEN ON SERVICE.

A meeting was called early in October and a Committee appointed as follows: the Vicar and Mrs. Thackery, Mr. H. Lawrence, Mr. and Mrs. Crocker, Mrs. Crailsbam, Miss Leach, and Miss Hardcastle (Hon. Treasurer.)

The appeal for funds again met with a warm response as will be seen by the figures given below. Special thanks are due to Mr. Pearce and Mr. W. Lovejoy, who took much pains in collecting from a large part of the parish.

The contents of the parcels were chosen by Mrs. Thackery and Mrs. Crocker, and wee as follows, the total number of parcels being 101. For men at the Front, 77 – sock,s writing case, soap, trench powder, potted meat. For men in England, 24 — socks, handkerchief and writing case, potted meat or soap, chocolate. The parcels were packed at the Brownlow Hall by the ladies of the Committee assited by a few others, and each one contained a card with the words: “With all good Christmas wishes from your friends at Warfield.” A great many acknowlededgments have already been received by Mr. Lawrence, all expressing much satisfaction with the parcels and appreciation of the remembrance.

The balance, after paying all expenses of the parcels, was expended on presents for the widows of the six men who have laid down their lives during this year.

Account of the Fund.
Received. Balance from 1916 £1 9 7
Proceeds of Whist Drive 6 10 2
Subscriptions, 1917 13 0 6
£21 0 3
Spent. Contents of Parcels 15 12 1
Paper and String 0 9 1
Postage 4 4 0
Presents to 6 Widows 0 15 0
£21 0 3 ‘

The Warfield Schools War Savings Association have now £207 12s. 0d. to their credit. This is mainly due to the thrift of the majority of the 113 members who have paid their contributions each Tuesday without a break.

Bracknell

CHRISTMAS PRESENTS to the Men Serving.

Parcels have been despatched to all out Bracknell and Chavey Down men serving abroad; we hope none have been forgotten. The money to pay for these presents had been collected by many kind workers, and a great number of people made some contribution. The parcels were packed and sent from the Vicarage, a number of people, including some of the wounded soldiers, helping to do them up.

Cranbourne

SOLDIERS’s PRESENTS

A Christmas present has been sent from Cranbourne to each of our men serving in His Majesty’s forces. A Christmas card has also been posted with a note saying that a present has been sent in a separate parcel. To defray the cost, £7 was contributed from the takings at the recent concert, donations amounting to £5 10s. 0d. have been received, and a house to house collection realised £6 8s. 0 1/2d. We are grateful to Miss Dodge, Miss Jennings and Miss Smith for their kindness in making this collection.

Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, January 1918 (D/P 151/281/10)

Advertisements

The great cause for which we are fighting – the cause of liberty, justice, peace and the fellowship of nations

Churches in the Bracknell area joined in the National Day of Intercession.

Ascot

Sunday, January 6th (The Epiphany) has been appointed as a day of Special Prayer for the War and the alms at all services will be for the Red Cross Fund.


Bracknell

‘THE WAR.—In accordance with the King’s Proclamation the first Sunday in the New Year, January 6th,the Feast of the Epiphany, will be observed as a special day of Prayer and Thanksgiving in Bracknell. The services in the Church will be held at the usual hours, but special forms of prayer will be used, and every one who desires to seek the help of God in these anxious times should make a point of being present. The collections will be given to the Red Cross Society.

Cranbourne

THE DAY OF NATIONAL PRAYER.
As we all know, the 1st Sunday in the New Year has been appointed as a “Day for Intercession on behalf of the Nation and Empire in this Time of War.” There will be celebrations of the Holy Communion as 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. Special forms of Prayer and Thanksgiving have been issued under the authority of the Archbishops of Canterbury and York and will be used at our services. January 6th is the Feast of the Epiphany. The idea of the Epiphany is the manifestation of God among all nations nations, and our Bishop has pointed out “how deeply we stand in need of such a manifestation to day, and how “the great cause for which we are fighting – the cause of liberty, justice, peace and the fellowship of nations – would truly, if it were realised, be a manifestation of God, and a preperation for the Kingdom of Christ, for which our most earnest and constant prayers are needed.

It is to be hoped that, whatever the weather is, none of us will be absent from the services on January 6th, but that we shall, as a Parish kneel before the Throne of Grace and offer up our petitions to Him who judges the peoples of the world, and is our only refuge and strength, and a very present help in time of trouble.

Winkfield

VICAR’s LETTER.

My Dear Friends,

Once again the New Year will find us in the midst of the horrors of war, and in our King’s words, “this world wide struggle for the triumph of right and liberty is entering on its last and most difficult phase when we shall need our courage fortified to face the sacrifices we may yet hace to make before our work is done.”

Very justly does the King call upon all his people to make the first Sunday of the New Year a Day of special Prayer and Thanksgiving, a day of National Intercession to Gon on Behalf of our Country, for the great casuse of rightousness entrusted to us, and for the men (so many of them near and dear to us in Winkfield) who are fighting for it on sea and land.

We all long for a victorious Peace, but can we expect that almighty God will, as a matter of course, give it us, if we do not think it worth while to ask Him for it by humble and united Public Prayer; for until we, as a whole Nation, realise our need od something more that material force, we do not deserve to win.

It is then a real patriotic duty for every man and woman to attend their Parish Church on January 6th and take their part in this National wave of Intercession. Our Sailors and Soldiers have a right to expect our prayers; and the help and co-operation of those who seldom or never go to Church or Chapel is specially asked on this great and solemn occasion.

I can only solemnly repeat what I wrote last year that I should not like to have on my own conscience the responsibility which that man or woman takes who could help their Country by joining in this movement, and yet is too careless and indifferent to do so.

If you belevie in God, and have any love for your Country, come and help.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,

H.M. Maynard

The Services on January 6th will be:

8 a.m., Holy Communion.
11 a.m. Service and Holy Communion.
6.30 p.m. Special Intercession Service (copies of which will be provided.)

Bracknell, February

The Day of Prayer and Thanksgiving in connection with the War on January 6th was fairly well kept in Bracknell. The congregations were larger than usual in the morning and evening, and in the afternoon a considerably number of people attended the special service. The weather was bad and hindered some who would have wished to be present, but it was a little disappointing not to have had quite crowded congregations on such a day.

Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, January 1918 (D/P 151/281/10)

Several names to add to the Roll of Honour

More Berkshire men had been killed.

Amongst our Bracknell and Chavey Down Soldiers we have several names to add to the Roll of Honour:-

Edwin Holloway, William Honeysett, Ernest Victor Thurmer, Alfred Sargeant. To the relations of all these we offer our deep sympathy.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Magazine, October 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/10)

A picture postcard of Warfield for Christmas

Soldiers from Bracknell, Chavey Down and Warfield were among those to get Christmas gifts from home.

Bracknell

A scheme has been arranged under which a Christmas present will be sent to all our men from Bracknell parish who are on active service, either in Navy or Army.

A Committee has been formed to collect the necessary funds, and very many people have gladly contributed. There are now about 200 men on active service, so that it is no light task to do up and despatch the parcels. The Chavey Down parcels are packed by Miss Lang with others to help, and the Bracknell parcels are done up by a number of kind people who meet at the Vicarage Parish Room. A letter is sent in each parcel to explain that it is a small gift sent from friends at home, as a token that our husbands, sons and brothers, who are fighting for us, are never forgotten.

Warfield

Warfield Sailors and Soldiers Christmas Presents Fund seems a long title. Last year we had two funds running, one in connection with the Brownlow Hall Club, the other for non-members of the same. This year there has been an amalgamation, and through liberal donations from one and all, the sum has nearly reached £20. May I state here, in the event of this coming for the first time to the notice of any of our friends, that the Secretary and Treasurer to the Fund is Miss Hardcastle, Rectory House, Warfield, by whom further donations will be thankfully received. We are chiefly sending socks, mittens, cocoa, chocolate and cake, and a picture postcard of Warfield containing 8 views.

Winkfield District Magazine, December 1916 (D/P151/28A/12)

We must cheerfully submit to any inconvenience and privation that comes to us through war

The organist at Holy Trinity, Bracknell, joined up, while other Bracknell men ould not be coming home.

Mr F. C. Faulkener, our Organist, has been called up to join H.M. Forces. This will be a great loss to us in the Church, and we shall greatly miss Mr. Faulkener’s beautiful playing and the efficient training that he has given to the choir. However the country has the first call on his services, and we have in this, as in many other ways, to cheerfully submit to any inconvenience and privation that comes to us through war.

Mr. F.W. Hunton, who was organist for many years, has most kindly given us his help, and Miss Emery, a lady on the Heathfield staff has also signified her readiness (with Miss Wyatt’s concurrence) to do what is possible to supply Mr. Faulkener’s place during his absence. If the result is that the congregation join in more heartily with the singing, perhaps we shall get some useful results even from our difficulties, and we must all do the best we can to make our services worthy of Him to whom they are offered.

THE WAR.-

Amongst those who have fallen we deeply regret to have to number Albert Searle, aged 22, Corporal in the Royal Berks. He was wounded when going into action at the head of his section, but kept up with wounderful courage and cheeriness. He died at the hospital at Rouen. Few young men could have won more affection and esteem than he. His work as Scoutmaster was typically thorough, energetic and unselfish.

Kenneth Grant, 2nd. Lieut. Seaforth Highlanders, was for some time a member of the Chavey Down Choir.

In our last number we mentioned that Sergt. G.W. Morton, of the Black Watch, had been killed in action. He fell on August 18th, and the following is an extract from a letter written by one of his officers.

“I personally led the attack and especially noted the late Sergt. Morton, for his bravery and the gallant way in which he handled his men both in and out of action; he was an excellent soldier and was very much liked by officers, N.C.O.’s and men of his battalion.”

Sergt. Morton was only 22 years of age, and had been on active service for 2 years.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Magazine, October 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/10)

Providing hostels for Girl Munition Workers

Women and girls in Bracknell were supporting the war effort in various ways.

G.F.S.

A sum of £26 6s. 5d. has been collected by the Association and Members of the Sunninghill and Warfield Branch of the Girls’ Friendly Society and sent to Headquarters for the provision of hostels for Girl Munition Workers. Of this sum £6 13s. 11d. was collected in Bracknell.

WAR WORK DEPOT.

The work at the depot continues with unabated energy. On March 22nd 300 badges, with accompanying certificates, from Queen Mary’s Needlework Guild, of which Bracknell is a Branch, were distributed to all those who, having worked regularly for the Guild for three months, had thus become eligible. A few days later the Secretary received the following letter from the Central Depot, Cavendish Square:-

The Council have much pleasure in informing you that Her Majesty the Queen has been graciously pleased to sanction the issue of a Royal Certificate to your Depot, as a Branch of the Central Depot, Surgical Branch of Queen Mary’s Needlework Guild. Very few of these Royal Certificates are to be granted, and the list of depots was submitted to Her Majesty, who graciously approved of the recommendation of your Depot. The Council are confident that your Depot will appreciate the honour bestowed by Her Majesty.

The granting of this Royal Certificate has given the greatest pleasure to the Committee, as it came as a complete surprise; and they share with our Workers the satisfaction which we all feel at the recognition by Her Majesty of our united efforts.

There are still a number of Workers qualifying for their Badges and Certificates, and the Committee wish to take this opportunity of saying, that as soon as they have worked regularly for three months for the Guild, they are entitled to apply to the Secretary for them.

Chavey Down section of Winkfield District magazine, May 1916 (D/P151/28A/5)

In support of Recreation Huts

Men and boys from Bracknell supported the Recreation Huts run by the Church of England for soldiers off duty.

C.E.M.S.
On Wednesday, January 19th, a whist Drive was held at the Boys’ Club in aid of Wokingham Federation Fund for supplying Recreation Huts for our troops at the front. About 80 were present, and a very enjoyable evening was spent. The proceeds amounted to £2 9s. 0d. The total amount collected by the Federation is £530 13s. 0d., of which our Branch has collected £45 4s. 1d. The Chavey Down Choir Boys contributed £1 14s. 3d., collected by themselves.

Bracknell section of the Winkfield District Magazine, February 1916 D/P151/28A/8/2

Christmas parcels

There was an interdenominational effort in Bracknell to co-ordinate sending Christmas gifts to the men at the front.

Christmas parcels have been sent to all the men who are on active service both in the Navy and the Army. The Chavey Down men received their parcels through the working party on the Down. The members of the Congregational Church and P.S.A. sent to those connected with their organizations, and the remainder, about 70 in number, were provided for by subscriptions contributed by many in Bracknell.

Grateful letters of acknowledgement have come from a large number of the men, who desire the Vicar to thank all the Bracknell friends who contributed; the contents of the parcels seem to have been much appreciated.

The parcels were packed by Mrs. Barnett at the Vicarage, with the kind assistance of Mr. Payne and Miss Hunton. The contents of the parcels were such things as biscuits in tins, cake, Oxo, potted meat, milk and cocoa, chocolate, apples, soap, candles and cigarettes.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Monthly Magazine, January 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/1)

A small pig

Bracknell people contributed eggs, chickens and a pig to the war effort.

EGGS FOR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.

Ever since April last eggs have been sent from Bracknell to the Care and Comforts Committee at Reading for use in the Soldiers’ Hospitals, but of late the only regular supply has come from Mr. Headington of Braywood, and we are most grateful to him for continuing his supply during this scarce time. Soon we hope the hens will be laying again and that our supply will be increased. The eggs should reach the Vicarage by Thursday evening, as they are sent off every Friday morning.

Mr. Herbert Green, the Assistant Scoutmaster of the Chavey Down Troop has joined the Army Flying Corps. Mr. Albert Futcher has kindly undertaken the duties which Mr. Green performed in true Scout fashion for two years.

An appeal was recently made to the Vicar for help from Bracknell to enable the Reading ladies to continue their useful work of providing refreshments to Soldiers travelling through Reading. Mr. Yorke very kindly undertook to try and collect some money, and arranged that a small pig should be sold at the market and the money given to the fund. The pig was presented by Mr. Shefford, and successive sellings resulted in a sum of £3 being made. Two bantams, given by Miss Annie Shefford, were also sold and produced £1 7s. 3d. The total, £4 7s. 3.d., was sent to Mrs. Henderson at Reading, and gratefully acknowledged. We desire to thank Messrs. Hunton who conducted the sale and all who took part in it.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Magazine, December 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/12)

All trying to “do our bit” to help our King and Country in one way or another

Spurred on by the loss of local men, women in Bracknell and district were working hard making medical supplies and warm clothing for the troops and Navy.

THE WAR

We have, we are grieved to say, two more names to add to the Roll of Honour of this Parish.

Percy Treble of the Royal Berks Regt. has been killed in the fighting in France and Harry Rixon of the Canadian Contingent succumbed to wounds received from bombs dropped by a Zeppelin in the last great raid. The families of both these young men are well known in Bracknell, and great sympathy is felt for them in their sorrow.

* * *

THE WAR WORK DEPOT.

The work at the Depot proceeds very satisfactorily and since it was opened on July 28th, many sandbags have been sent to Miss Tyler’s office in Highgate for distribution to the Front. The Needlework department has sent 19 flannel shirts, 10 cotton ditto, 41 pyjama suits, 22 bed jackets to the Central Depot, St. Marylebone, and to the mine sweepers 23 flannel shirts. The Surgical Dressing Department has made and handed over to the same Central Depot of which Miss Ethel McCaul is the organiser, 13 leg rests, 55 splints, 15 hip, 30 T., 20 stump and 80 abdominal bandages, 468 Turkey towelling, 408 gauze and 620 puff (gauze and wool) swabs, 20 caps for head wound dressings, 54 jug and basin covers. The Knitting department too has been doing good work and several dozen pairs of socks, sea boot stockings, steering gloves, mittens and cuffs have been made, also scarves and helmets, for the men of the mine sweeping fleet, patrol boats and trawlers.

The number of workers attending the depot continues to be satisfactory, though there is still room for more, who would be welcome. The average attendance is about 100 each day. The hours the rooms are now open are from 9.45 to 4.45 on Wednesdays and Fridays, the failing daylight making it expedient to close earlier. Tea is served at 4.15 at a charge of 2d. per head; the money thus taken goes towards the running expenses of cleaning and firing. For the convenience of those workers wishing to bring their lunch, arrangements are made for them to eat it in comfort, and upon notice being given to the Secretary on their arrival, tea can be made, or soup, milk or other hot drinks warmed for them.

Warfield Parish has its subsidiary working party and is making hospital clothing, housewives, and sandbags, and sending in through this depot, providing their own material but using the patterns supplied by Bracknell. Chavey Down is doing the same and has sent in a capital consignment of pyjama suits and helpless-case night shirts to the needlework department. Thus are we all trying to “do our bit” to help our King and Country in one way or another.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/11)

A united shout for St George and Merry England

The Warden of the Community of St John Baptist, a clergyman who advised the Sisterhood at Clewer, suggested that 23 April, the feast day of St George, the patron saint of England, should form a new focus for patriotic prayers in support of the war effort.

23 April 1915
By the Warden’s desire, and in accordance with the wish of the Visitor [the Bishop of Oxford], St George’s Day would be specially observed as a Day of Prayer for our country…

There was a choral celebration of the Holy Eucharist, with special Collect, Epistle & Gospel appointed by the Visitor, at 8.30. A chain of Intercessory Prayer was kept up from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., and the “Special Litany” for the war was said at midday.

St George’s Day was celebrated by churchgoers in Warfield with the local Boy Scouts.

ST. GEORGE FOR MERRY ENGLAND.

At the request of the Bishop of the Diocese the Feast of St. George was kept with special honour. A special Collect, Epistle and Gospel were provided, and at Warfield there were two early celebrations at 7 and 8, and in the afternoon there was a meeting of the Mothers’ Union at 3, when the Vicar gave an address on the hero saint. In the evening there was a massed gathering of the Scouts from Bracknell, Chavey Down, Easthampstead, together with our own, who assembled in Bracknell and marched with two bands, one bugle and drum, the other fife and drum, to the Brownlow Hall, where they were met by the Vicar who gave them an address on St. George and the dragon. The meeting ended with a united shout for St George and Merry England.

Annals of the Community of St John Baptist (D/EX1675/1/14/5); Warfield section of Winkfield District Magzine, May 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/5)

“These Indians are splendid fellows, and such fighters”

A wounded soldier from Ascot had words of praise for the Gurkhas and Indian soldiers he was serving with, while two Bracknell men had been killed.

Ascot

THE WAR.

Two of our Ascot lads, Eric Ferns and Sidney Sumner, are amongst the wounded, of Sidney Sumner we shall have more to say in our April Number. The following extracts from a letter of Eric Ferns will be read with interest:-

“I have been very queer for a month now after my smash up. It was on December 9th. I was taking a car full of Gurkhas on to the field, and there came a German aeroplane, and dropped a bomb, and it missed my car, and a crowd of people gathered round to see if we were hit: and the same aeroplane dropped another bomb and took the back of my car off, and pitched me yards into a ditch. I don’t remember any more until I woke up, and found myself in Hospital. That was on the following Tuesday. I got 3 in me, one in the foot, one in the leg, and the other in the wrist: but the shock was dreadful. My foot and leg are much better: but my wrist is still bad, but I have much to be thankful for, as they told me 24 were killed and 4 injured by the same bomb…

These Indians are splendid fellows, and such fighters, they think of nothing else but this war. It is all rain, and up to your knees in mud…”

Bracknell

THE ROLL OF HONOUR

At the end of January news came that two more of those who are on our list on the Church door and fallen in the war.

WILLIAM KING GEORGE was the eldest son of Mr. S. King George of the Brackens. He was serving as Captain in the 3rd Gloucesters, and was killed at La Bassée on 25th January. His Colonel wrote of him, “We feel that we have lost a most gallant comrade and a true friend.” Captain George was married and leaves two sons.

GEORGE BRANT, who fell about the same time, was called up as a Reservist at the beginning of the war. He was a Private in the Queen’s West Surrey Regiment. His parents now live in Martin’s Lane, and were formerly living at Chavey Down. Brant was a widower and leaves two children.

Winkfield District Magazine, March 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/3)

Much needed gifts for the Belgians via Harrods

People from Cranbourne and Chavey Down were generous in their gifts for our Belgian allies.

Chavey Down

The working party at Chavey Down have forwarded a nice parcel of very well made children’s clothes to the Belgian Refugees at Folkestone, where they are very much needed.

Cranbourne

The HARVEST THANKSGIVING SERVICES were held on October 5th. Only the East end and the Font were decorated with flowers. The real decorations of the Church were gifts from the congregation for the distressed in Belgium. A really remarkable response was made to the appeal for these gifts. Nine cases (kindly given by Mr. Laird) were delivered to Messrs. Harrods for shipment to Belgium. The driver of the van said “I am going back to London with almost as much as I started with.”

* * *

The following are the names of those from this Parish who are serving in His Majesty’s Forces:

Creasy G., Midshipman H. M. S. Conqueror.
Creasy, R., 2nd Lieut. R. F. A.
Haig, J., Major, Westminster Dragoons.
Needham, E. J., Lieut, Northamptonshire Regiment.
Needham, R. P., 2nd Lieut, Northamptonshire Regiment.
Phillips, E. H., D. S. O, Major R. F. A.
Phillips, R. N., Captain, Royal Welsh Fusiliers.
Phillips, G. F., Captain, Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry.
Andrews, James, Hampshire Regiment.
Barratt, Archibald Richard, National Reserve.
Beasley, T.
Brant, Ernest Harold.
Bish, Walter George, Army Service Corps.
Boyde, Albert Ernest, Army Service Corps.
Boyde, Edward Joseph, Royal Navy.
Clarke, Wilfred Lawson, Royal Berks Regiment.
Cox, Amariah, Royal Berks Regiment.
Curtis, Eric, Seaforth Highlanders.
George, William, Royal Artillery.
Goodchild, Charles.
Greenough, Edward, Royal Engineers.
Herridge, John, Royal Engineers.
Herridge, William, Royal Engineers.
Harwood, Frederick, 12th Lancers.
Higgs, Herbert, Army Service Corps.
Holliday, Walter George, Royal Warwickshire Regiment.
Harriss, Theodore William, Royal Berks Regiment.
Harriss, Frederick, Royal Engineers.
Hawthorn, George Albert, Royal Naval Flying Corps.
Hillyer, Tom, Canadian Contingent.
Mapp, Ernest, Royal Berks Regiment.
Pither, J. A., Royal Berks Regiment.
Pither, J., Enniskillen Dragoons.
Sarney, Albert Edward, Royal Navy.
Sarney, Francis, Grenadier Guards.
Searle, George, 2nd Life Guards.
Walls, Charles John, Royal Berks Regiment.
Walls, Leslie, Royal Berks Regiment.
Williams, R. F. Maxwell, Royal Naval Brigade.
Ward, Theodore Alfred, Royal Berks Regiment.
Weston, George.

* * *

C. E. M. S.
The annual business meeting was held on October 14th. After the Election of Officers and other business them embers and a few friends were shown some lantern slides illustrating the war in Belgium.

Chavey Down and Cranbourne sections of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1914 (D/P151/28A/6/11)

Help our neighbours and lighten the burdens of war

The Warfield parish magazine reveals that Bracknell people were keenly supporting those affected by the war – the unemployed and Belgian refugees alike.

Bracknell

The Harvest Thanksgiving Service will be held on Wednesday, October 7th, at 8 p.m. The preacher will be the Rev. W. Thackerey, Vicar of Warfield. On Sunday, October 11th, the Church Dedication Festival will be kept. On Sunday, October 18th, there will be Thanksgiving Services for the harvest at St. Martin’s Church, Chavey Down.

At the time, when our thoughts are so constantly engaged in matters connected with the War, it may seem to some that it is difficult and even impossible to enter into these Thanksgiving Services and Festivals with the same heartiness that we have done in former years. But there is a special reason for thankfulness this year for a Harvest that has been on the whole so bounteous. Had it been otherwise our difficulties would have been increased, and our anxieties deepened, so that we shall assemble with very thankful hearts to thank God for His Gifts both for bodies and souls. The Alms on October 11th to the Royal Berks Hospital at Reading.

THE WAR.

A local Committee has been formed to deal with any cases of distress which may arise in the War. It is hoped that the usual employment in this district will continue as usual, and that there will not be many thrown out of work, but the Committee will be in existence to deal with any emergency if it is required. The dependents of Sailors and Soldiers have already and organization which will deal with the distress which may arise in the families of those who have gone to service, and the Government separation allowance is to be increased from 1st of October, which will, it is hoped, be enough to meet the need of the wives and families of married men; but the Committee will endeavour to see that none of those who are dependent on the help of the Sailors and Soldiers are suffering. The war must affect us all, and each one will have some additional burdens of anxiety or suffering, but if we are all ready to help our neighbours these burdens will be lightened.

In combination with our neighbours in Easthampstead we are doing something to help poor Belgian people upon whom much suffering has fallen. By the generosity of Mr. E. Lawrence, the Brewery House near the station has been lent for six months, and this has been fitted up as a home for Belgian Refugees.

Several families have already arrived and been settled in this house. Furniture has been provided, partly by purchase, partly by loan, and a sum of money has been promptly and generously contributed, sufficient to maintain them for the period for which the house has been lent.

Lady Haversham is the Chairman of the Committee that has organized the Home, the Rev. H. Salwey is the Secretary, and the Vicar is acting as Treasurer; gifts of vegetables and fruit will be very acceptable, and should be sent to the Matron.

Our daily Services of Intercession for the King and all in authority, for the Sailors and Soldiers who are serving their Country, and for the Wounded and Sick, and for those that have fallen, is held at 12 o’clock. When we think that nearly one hundred names of those who have gone to service from our own Parish are on the Church door, many will surely be glad to come together for a few minutes to join in prayer for them, and others, who are not able to come to Church will also offer up a prayer when they hear the Church bell.

Winkfield and Warfield parish magazine, October 1914 (D/P151/28A/6)

Bracknell supports the war

Bracknell was another parish which responded to the war with a combination of prayer, financial support, and needlework, with some preparing to take on nursing work:

NATIONAL RELIEF FUND.
The collections in Church both at Holy Trinity and at St. Martin’s on Sunday, August 16th , and on Friday, 21st, were given to the Prince of Wales Relief Fund, and together with what was sent afterwards amounted to £12 9s. 9d.

WAR INTERCESSIONS.
After Morning and Evening Service on alternate Sundays, and after Evensong on Wednesdays, Special Services of Intercession are being held, and at all Services special prayers for our sailors and soldiers are being used.

The Church bell is being rung every day at 12, and it is hoped that this will remind all who hear it to offer up a short prayer wherever they may be, and so to join with those who can come to Church then for a short Intercessory Service.

DAY OF INTERCESSION
Friday, August 21st, was appointed to be observed as a day of Solemn Prayer, and Intercession in the present crisis. Holy Communion was celebrated at 8 a.m., and besides Morning and Evening Prayer, two Special Services were held at noon and 8 p.m.

CHAVEY DOWN NOTES.
The call to prayer received a response in some ways satisfactory, but which can still be increased.

Intercession Services have been held twice a week, at 4 p.m. and at 7.30p.m. There was a fair attendance at the Holy Communion on Friday, August 21st.

By the time this appears it is hoped that a sewing party will have been organised and will have sent up garments for our wounded troops. The meetings will be held on Tuesdays in the Parish Room at 2.30p.m.

BRITISH RED CROSS SOCIETY.
The work is progressing steadily. Mrs. Sheppee, Mrs. Sargeant and Mrs. Fielden have held working parties, the latter being the head of the needlework. Many are working at home as well. The Women’s V.A.D. are attending practices and lectures, kindly given by Mrs Leggatt, of Binfield, and the men are training new assistants in stretcher work.

Ascot, Bracknell, Cranbourne and Winkfield District magazine, Seeptember 1914 (D/P151/28A/6)